University Beat

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

You would think after playing defensive end for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for nine years, and then 11 more as a Tampa firefighter, John Cannon might have back pain.

But the engineer-driver said he feels pretty good, thanks in part to a short exercise program TFR put together with researchers from USF Health - a program that, with the help of a $1.3 million federal grant, will soon be tested by firefighters in the Tampa Bay area's three largest departments.

Jesse McLane / WUSF TV

A University of South Florida student who came to the United States from Mexico when she was 6 years old is in Cleveland this week, working and studying at the Republican National Convention.

USF Communications and Marketing

A trio of rankings recently came out on a variety of subjects, and for the University of South Florida, two out of three weren't bad.

USF picked up the top spot in a national ranking of public universities when it comes to student success and once again made the top 10 among public universities for U.S. patents.

But it placed almost right in the middle of some 700-plus schools in Money magazine's "most valuable" universities.

WUSF TV

Teddy Mullet has always liked building things by hand. While his cousin bought a kit to build a laser, Mullet decided to buy the parts separately and make his own. So when he was in his junior year at Sarasota Christian School, he was thinking of applying to University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.

One problem – USFSM had no engineering program.

Visit Tampa Bay

While Britain continues dealing with the fallout of its vote to leave the European Union, tourism experts are looking at the possible effects the decision will have on tourism here in Florida.

The M3 Center for Hospitality Technology and Innovation at USF Sarasota-Manatee hosted an online panel discussion on the subject Wednesday.

Wikimedia Commons

Holocaust survivor and Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel died Saturday at the age of 87 in his New York home.

Wiesel taught at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg as a visiting professor. Every year he would speak to incoming freshman, who were required to read Night, an autobiographical account of his experience as a Jew during the Holocaust.

At the age of 15, Wiesel was taken to Auschwitz, a Nazi concentration camp in 1944. His family was separated from him, except for his father Shlomo.

Recent USF graduates Victor Sims (left) and Frank Cirillo are both running for political office this year.
campaign Facebook pages

CORRECTION posted at 7/5/16 3:30 p.m. Copy and University Beat radio report updated to indicate Frank Cirillo graduated from USF's Tampa campus and not USF Sarasota-Manatee.

This year, while a lot of college students are getting ready to vote in their first presidential election, two recent University of South Florida graduates are running for office.

Glenn Nickerson / WUSF TV

In 2009, University of South Florida School of Architecture and Community Design students Sean Verdecia and Jason Ross watched Hurricane Katrina and the aftermath.

What struck them was the lack of quick, proper shelter for the victims of an event like this.

"The Committee" website via UCF

Thanks in part to work by WUSF TV, more than 70 public TV stations around the country will air an award-winning documentary that looks back at a 1950s and 60s legislative effort that targeted a then fledgling University of South Florida.

"The Committee," which was produced by faculty and students at the University of Central Florida, examines the Florida Legislature Investigation Committee -- also known as the Johns Committee, after its chairman, state senator and former governor Charley Johns.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

UPDATED at 2:30 p.m. on 6/23 with Pres. Genshaft quote and information on how USF will use the funding.

The University of South Florida is one step closer to joining the University of Florida and Florida State University as one of the state's elite public universities - and one step closer to receiving the funding that goes with that ranking.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

  If you drive through the Unity Park area of St. Petersburg, maybe looking for parking for Tropicana Field, you’ve probably seen Faith House Florida - a collection of four brightly colored apartment houses and a garden on 15th Street North.

What makes Faith House stand out in the oak canopy lined neighborhood, surrounded by single family homes, is that it’s a structured residential program for people battling substance abuse issues, recently released prison inmates and homeless people.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

  It’s a problem that affects 700,000 people in the ten-county Tampa Bay area: food insecurity.

Thomas Mantz, the Executive Director of the group Feeding Tampa Bay says food insecurity is when people like you and me don’t have consistent access to food due to a lack of money or other resources. 

courtesy Paul Spector

(This report originally aired April 12, 2016, and is reairing June 7, 2016.)

In the 1980s, one bestselling book advised people to "do what you love, the money will follow."

Others believe in the adage "do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life."

While neither of those concepts can probably never really be proven correct or not, a pair of University of South Florida psychologists are taking on a similar idea: if a person has a a calling, a form of work someone finds fulfilling, what happens if they pursue it - and what happens if they don't?

"Deadly Secrets: The Lost Children of Dozier" debuts Friday, June 3, at 8 p.m. on LMN.
LMN / Part2Productions

The University of South Florida's lengthy investigation of the Dozier School for Boys is the subject of a national TV documentary debuting Friday night, June 3.

"Deadly Secrets: The Lost Children of Dozier" takes an in-depth look at the more than 100-year history of the Florida Reform School, decades of allegations of abuse, and the mysterious deaths of dozens of students.

While officials from USF and FIO and local politicians look on, Duckworth Steel Boats owner Junior Duckworth (center, back) performs the ceremonial keel laying of the new research vessel.
Amie Blodgett / USF News

Next summer, a group of marine researchers and local politicians who gathered at a Tarpon Springs shipyard for a ceremonial keel laying plan to return for the dedication of a new research ship.

With the touching of a blow torch to the keel Wednesday morning, construction formally began on the 78-foot vessel at Duckworth Steel Boats.

USF students in the "Introduction to Food Studies" course gather at their vegetable garden planted at the USF Botanical Gardens.
Jesse McLane / WUSF TV

Think back to the last time you had a salad.

Was it one of those bags that you buy at a store, tear open some envelopes with the various ingredients, mix and eat?

Or are you one of those folks with a green thumb who takes your vegetables all the way from seed to the salad bowl?

Well there’s a class at the University of South Florida that’s trying to turn students from the former into the latter.

Five medical groups are joining forces to form the Tampa Bay Health Alliance to increase access to high quality, efficient health care.

Daniel Yeh / USF College of Engineering

For USF graduate research assistant Robert Bair, work he normally does in the laboratory isn’t as easy when he’s out in the field. And in this case, we literally mean a field in India.

"So a lot of things happen that you wouldn’t expect in a lab - a few weeks ago we had a few coconuts from a tree fall onto our data logger, and of course, not a lot of damage was done, but it wasn’t something we expected," he said recently via Skype. "And we had to rearrange the site configuration just so that wouldn’t happen again so we could prevent further damage."

Gobulls.com

Ever since the University of South Florida started playing football 19 years ago, the question has been: Will there ever be an on-campus football stadium?

We soon might have an answer, thanks to a feasibility study the university is conducting.

Joseph Gamble / Joseph Gamble Photography

Terry Tomalin, the outdoors editor for the Tampa Bay Times, died suddenly Thursday.

Tomalin was also a member of the faculty at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, where he taught digital journalism and led the Outdoor Leadership Program. He was also a graduate of USF.

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