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Updated at 11:15 p.m. ET

At least eight people were killed and "more than a dozen" were injured Tuesday afternoon after a motorist drove onto a busy pedestrian and bicycle path in Manhattan. Police have arrested a 29-year-old man identified by law enforcement officials as Sayfullo Saipov. Authorities have said there are "no others outstanding" in the incident, which unfolded near the World Trade Center.

Conviction Upheld In Tampa Bay Terror Plot

Aug 21, 2017
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A federal appeals court Friday upheld the conviction and 40-year prison sentence of a man convicted in a plot to carry out terror attacks in the Tampa Bay area as “payback” for the death of Osama bin Laden.

CNN.com

News of a suicide bomber outside a pop concert in Manchester, England earlier this week horrified us.

As expected, cable news shows and online publications responded right away – piecing some of the breaking news story together using a slew of social media.

One result was an endless loop of cell phone videos on our computers and TVs from victims at the event.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

One day after a bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, killed at least 22 victims and wounded dozens more, police have identified a suspect: Salman Abedi, 22, who also died in the attack. The Greater Manchester Police says it's investigating whether anyone helped to carry out the attack.

Last year’s Orlando attack—the worst mass shooting in modern American history—is prompting Governor Rick Scott to put millions of dollars in his proposed budget toward counterterrorism and intelligence efforts in Florida. Law enforcement agencies around the state are praising Scott’s decision.

President Barack Obama will travel to Tampa next week to give his final speech about U.S. counterterrorism strategy.

On Thursday night, in Nice, France, thousands of people were gathered on a seaside promenade to watch the Bastille Day fireworks.

Then a man in a truck accelerated into the crowd, and kept going. His attack killed more than 80 people, and didn't end until police shot him dead.

Imad Dafaaoui, a Moroccan university student, was horrifyingly close to the truck. He told Morning Edition he saw a crowd of people running toward him, with a white truck behind them, and he too turned to flee.

But he made a nearly fatal error: he ran in the wrong direction.

Law enforcement leaders are telling a congressional committee in Washington the Orlando area's tens of millions of tourists should be given greater weight in determining which metro areas get federal money for preventing and responding to terrorist threats, citing the recent fatal nightclub shooting.

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A complicated picture has emerged of 29-year-old Omar Mateen, who opened fire in a gay Orlando nightclub. The attack left 49 dead and dozens more wounded in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Mary Shedden/WUSF

About one hundred people gathered near the Metro Wellness Center in Ybor City Sunday night to remember the victims of the Orlando shooting.

Like another vigil held in St. Petersburg, a collection of interfaith groups and other civic activist groups organized the gathering.

Joel Bates is a Tampa resident with friends in Orlando who go to the Pulse nightclub, the LGBT nightclub where the massacre took place. He says none of them were hurt in the shooting.

On Sunday morning, a gunman at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., perpetrated the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. He killed 49 people and injured more than 50.

The city of Orlando has released the names of the identified victims, after notifying their next of kin.

At first, they say, it seemed like just part of the music.

It was a Saturday night and the dance tracks had been pounding at the Pulse Orlando nightclub, which calls itself the city's hottest gay bar. A sharp, staccato sound, arriving shortly after 2 a.m. ET, didn't seem out of place.

"I thought it was a Ying Yang Twins song or something," club-goer Christopher Hansen told reporters. "It went with the beat almost."

In what has become an all-too-familiar ritual in the United States, President Obama said the mass shooting in Orlando on Sunday morning was an "act of terror and an act of hate."

"This is a sobering reminder that attacks on any American ... is an attack on all of us," Obama said during remarks from the White House briefing room. "No act of hate or terror will ever change who we are as Americans."

Obama also said that this shooting is a reminder of "how easy it to let people get their hands on a weapon" that will let them open fire on a place like a school.

A gunman opened fire on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday morning, killing at least 50 people in the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history before being shot dead by police.

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A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun took hostages and opened fire inside a crowded Orlando nightclub, killing approximately 50 people and wounding 53 others before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said Sunday. It's the worst mass shooting in U.S. history.

Ketevan Kardava/ Georgian Public Broadcaster via AP

Bombs exploded at the Brussels airport and one of the city's metro stations Tuesday, killing at least 31 people and wounding dozens, as a European capital was again locked down amid heightened security threats. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attacks.

The two airport blasts, at least one of them blamed on a suicide bomber, left behind a chaotic scene of splattered blood in the departure lounge as windows were blown out, ceilings collapsed and travelers streamed out of the smoky building.

President Obama used a rare Oval Office address Sunday evening to speak to a worried nation about the evolving threat of terrorism and the growing influence of the Islamic State.

One of the biggest messages the president tried to communicate to the American people was that a fear of terrorist attacks must not translate into a fear of all Muslims and spark unnecessary targeting. But judging by the immediate response after the speech, Obama did little to bridge the partisan divide.

Inevitably, as news breaks of yet another international or domestic event — an explosion in Texas, a train derailment outside Philadelphia, a Molotov cocktail thrown into a nightclub in Egypt, a shooting in Colorado or California — there's one question never far from Americans' lips: "Is it terrorism?"

Even many who don't want to generalize wonder, "What do we know about the shooter — was he or she Muslim?"

At a news conference in Turkey on Monday, President Obama defended his administration's strategy against ISIS, calling Friday's deadly terrorist attacks in Paris "outrageous." He said, however, the U.S. would not send additional ground troops into Syria to combat the Islamic State.

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