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TECO Deal Includes Rate Freeze, Solar Expansion

Sep 29, 2017

Tampa Electric Company has asked state regulators to approve a proposed agreement that would largely freeze base rates though 2021 and help lead to an expansion of solar energy.

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Electric bills for thousands of Floridians could go up.

Duke Energy Florida and Tampa Electric Company filed to increase customers' monthly electric bills. If approved, Duke customers will pay 8.5 percent more in 2018, raising rates to $128.54 per 1,000 kilowatt hours, the average energy use per home each month.

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In late June, five workers at TECO's Big Bend power station in Apollo Beach were gravely injured in an accident.

Two died that day, three others later succumbed to their injuries.  Another worker was left seriously burned. 

Over the last two decades, more workers have died at Tampa Electric’s power plants than at those run by any other Florida utility.

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Tampa Police say Florida Fish and Wildlife Officer Gregory Patterson was killed after hitting a downed live electrical wire while riding his bike on the Courtney Campbell Causeway early Wednesday morning. It happened around 6:40. 

A medical examiner will determine the exact cause of death, but police say it appears he was electrocuted.

TECO Energy, the parent company of Tampa Electric and Peoples Gas System, will be sold to Canada-based Emera Inc. in a deal estimated at $10.4 billion, the companies announced Friday.

The deal, which has been approved by the boards of both companies, is expected to close in mid-2016.

Study: Florida Third-Worst For Power Plant Pollution

Sep 11, 2013
Yoselis Ramos

Even though Florida is known for its sunshine, we have the third-worst carbon* pollution of any state, at least according to one report.

A citizen advocacy group, Environment Florida,  released a report today called "America's Dirtiest Power Plants."  Environment Florida used 2011 federal data to rank the dirtiest power plants nationwide. Florida ranks third in electric power sector emissions, particularly in carbon dioxide.

TECO Seeks to Raise Residential Rates by 10%

Feb 4, 2013

Tampa Electric Company will ask for a 10 percent increase on residential rates. It could mean an average of $11 extra a month coming out of customers' pockets.

TECO  is blaming the slow recovery of the economy and costs to maintaining their infrastructures for the rate increase request.

"We know there's never a good time to raise rates and we empathize with our customers who like us are also feeling the effects of a difficult economy," says company spokeswoman Cherie Jacobs.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF News

A new effort to promote clean energy for transportation in the Tampa Bay area was launched at USF Tuesday morning, but it's not the first time such an initiative has been attempted. In the late 1990s, the Suncoast Clean Cities Coalition brought together dozens of member groups interested in alternative energy. However, the coalition died out in part because resources weren't available.

Fast forward to today, when electric cars are more prevalent and gas is nearly four dollars a gallon, and the need for a centralized organizing group has been rekindled. That need is being met with the Tampa Bay Clean Cities Coalition.

"The timing is perfect because now I think the general public that doesn't have time to pay attention to this stuff on a daily basis can see that these technologies are not for hobbyists or transportation geeks like me," said the USF's Patel School of Global Sustainability's Stephen Reich. "They're really mainstream alternatives to filling their tanks with petroleum or diesel every day."

Horia Varlan

A nationwide energy scam has cropped up in Florida. And just to be clear, for the ones who've fallen for it, President Barack Obama will not be picking up your energy tab.

Almost 2,000 Tampa Electric customers were duped into believing the President was going to pay their power bill. Customers say they heard of the deal by text, Facebook message and notices on their front doors.

TECO spokeswoman Sylvia Vega says no one seems to have profited from the prank.

Vega explains what happened: