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Tampa Museum of Art

Tampa Museum of Art

A treasured painting has returned to the Tampa Museum of Art and is a centerpiece for its latest exhibit, "Photorealism: 50 years of Hyperrealistic Painting."

Lori Ballard / Creative Loafing

In the atrium of the Tampa Museum of Art, a dancer moved gracefully to pensive piano music. That was just one of the many acts at last year's GASP!--a one night festival for theater, dance, poetry, music and more.

This year, GASP! is back.

The festival is a collaborative effort between the Tampa Museum of Art and Creative Loafing

It’s hard to find anything more quintessentially American than the artwork of Norman Rockwell.

The Tampa Museum of Art has.

It’s offering free admission to Rockwell’s art today to military, veterans and their families. The exhibit, American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell, is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Courtesy of the Collection of Andrew Rayburn and Heather Guess and Pékin Fine Arts, Beijing

A few years ago, the directors of the St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts and the Tampa Museum of Art decided they wanted to collaborate on something.  

After Todd Smith of the Tampa Museum of Art traveled to China with art critic and foremost Chinese art expert Barbara Pollack, he and Kent Lydecker of the St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts realized they'd found their project.

Courtesy of the Mahan Collection, Special Collections, USF Tampa Library

Dr. Charles Mahan, Professor and Dean Emeritus for the USF College of Public Health, has been collecting cartoons and cartoon-related memorabilia for sixty years.

In fact, he's already donated over thirty boxes of materials, including original Disney animation, to the USF Library's Special and Digital Collections. But in addition to Mickey Mouse, Mahan also loves political cartoons, collecting over eight thousand of them. 

“A good one tells you at a glance, sort of catches your imagination," said Mahan. "Maybe you say, ‘boy, that’s right on’ or maybe it makes you mad, but it makes you react.”

Now, with the continued help of the USF Library, a small portion of his vast portfolio is on display at the Tampa Museum of Art.