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stroke

Time is one of the biggest factors in treating strokes — and a group of South Florida researchers say they’ve found a way to buy stroke patients more time.

If a person has a stroke, the sooner they get treatment, the better their odds are of surviving and of healing without permanent disability. Generally, the thinking has been that patients have a window of no more than six hours for a clot-removal surgery to be effective.

But people don’t always know when they’ve had a stroke — like if it happens while they’re sleeping. And that complicates treatment options. 

Clyde Butcher, Florida's well-known landscape and environmental photographer who suffered a stroke in early May, recently returned to the swamp for a photo excursion.

Internationally renowned photographer and environmental advocate Clyde Butcher suffered a stroke in early May on the left side of his brain, which has affected his right hand and arm as well as his right leg.  For more than 30 years, Butcher has hiked deep into Big Cypress National Preserve, the western Everglades and other natural Florida locations to capture his iconic black and white photographs of our region’s pristine wild spaces. 

At a meeting for young stroke survivors at the University of Central Florida’s Aphasia House, it’s craft time.

Here, a few of the young people who have had strokes are chatting. They melt peppermints into cookie cutter shapes. But the crafts are really just pretext for hanging out and chatting with people who know what it’s like to survive a stroke at a young age.