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Sen. Tom Lee

After drawing widespread opposition from business and agriculture groups, a proposal to redefine legal standing for Floridians on environmental issues won’t go before voters in November.

The Judicial Committee of the Florida Constitution Revision Commission on Friday unanimously rejected the proposal (P 23), filed by commission member Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch, with opponents saying it was too broad.

Lawmakers To Again Consider `Direct Primary Care'

Aug 10, 2017

After the issue stalled in the Senate at the end of this spring's legislative session, lawmakers could take up a proposal in 2018 that would clear the way for doctors and patients to enter into “direct primary care” agreements.

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Nearly a decade after the Great Recession, Florida may finally restore one of its main programs that aids students headed to college.

The state Legislature late Monday approved an overhaul of the state's higher education system that is intended to lift schools in the Sunshine State into the ranks of elite counterparts.

Raymond James Stadium Funding Request May Get Sacked

Feb 17, 2017

A request for state money to help cover ongoing improvements at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa satisfies state funding requirements. However, there is little chance the request from Buccaneers Football Stadium Limited Partnership for Raymond James Stadium will get much consideration from the Legislature.

The partnership's request for Raymond James Stadium --- $1 million a year, for at least 10 years --- would offset already-started renovations projected to cost between $120 million and $140 million. It is the only stadium-funding application now before the Legislature.

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A bill allowing patients and doctors to enter into primary care agreements has moved forward. These "direct primary care" agreements generally involve monthly payments between patients -- or patients' employers -- and their doctors. They cover routine medical care without involving insurance companies.

Key Republicans on Tuesday asserted that the administration of Florida Gov. Rick Scott was playing politics in a continuing fight over health care that has already derailed one legislative session this year.

Scott, who has changed his stance on whether to expand Medicaid coverage twice now, is opposed to a plan pushed by Senate Republicans that would use federal money to provide private insurance to low-income Floridians.