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sea level rise

Marc Haze / WUSF News

Hurricane season is well underway. And storms that hit the coast can wreak havoc on our state's beaches. This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our discussion on beach erosion and how to repair it.


Stephanie Colombini

Many scientists say sea level rise in Florida is accelerating. How is that affecting coastal communities now, and what can residents and elected officials do to brace themselves for future change?

NOAA

Many scientists have expressed concerns that rising sea levels and growing population could be problematic for Florida’s coastal communities. Florida Matters wants to hear what you think.

According to new research, Central Florida will be one of the top destinations for residents displaced by sea level rise in the coming century.

The University of Georgia study is believed to be the first to examine how sea level rise will reshape the nation's population inland.

Leaders of local governments re-affirmed their commitment to reducing greenhouse gases, unanimously approving a historic environmental resolution Monday at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Miami Beach.

The 259 mayors in attendance voted in favor of a resolution titled "100% Renewable Energy in American Cities," agreeing to set a goal of powering their communities exclusively by wind, solar, geothermal and wave energy by the year 2035. 

President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement could accelerate damage to his family's real estate empire in the coming decades, especially his properties that lie just feet from the encroaching sea in low-lying South Florida.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, monitors weather and climate change for the federal government. It predicts about one foot of sea level rise by 2100 under the best case scenario, and more than eight feet of sea level rise in the so-called “extreme” scenario.

Florida Keys officials have approved a framework for county roads that need to be adapted to rising sea levels.

Florida’s military installations face more flooding and hurricane damage as the seas rise.

SumterCountyFL.gov

While some scientists say Florida is the state at the greatest risk of the effects of global warming, the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting says state officials feel otherwise.

How Florida Kids Learn About Sea-Level Rise

Nov 12, 2013
Daniel Rivera, Student

Standing at the water’s edge on Florida International University’s Biscayne Bay campus, Nicholas Ogle shows a crowd of teenagers what looks like a giant, rotten green bean.

“We don’t want any mushiness anywhere, especially at the top,” he says, then chucks the specimen to the side.

Florida — especially South Florida — is very flat and very low, and in places like Miami Beach and Key West, buildings are just 3 feet above sea level. Scientists now say there may be a 3-foot rise in the world's oceans by the end of the century.

Satellite imagery confirmed long-term trends of mangrove expansion and aggressive habitat loss near the shore. This trend is related to salt water intrusion caused by sea-level rise and water management practices, according to the new study. The team found large patches of vegetation loss closer to the coast, about 2.5 miles from the shoreline, in and around a vegetative band of low productivity that has been shifting inland over the past 70 years. “Less salt-tolerant plants like the sawgrass, spike rush, and tropical hardwood hammocks are retreating. At the same time, salt-loving mangroves continue to extend inland,” according to Fuller, professor of Geography and Regional studies in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Miami.