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Science

Wednesday was the day astronomers said goodbye to the old Milky Way they had known and loved and hello to a new view of our home galaxy.

A European Space Agency mission called Gaia just released a long-awaited treasure trove of data: precise measurements of 1.7 billion stars.

Tim Fanning / WUSF Public Media

The University of South Florida Engineering Expo, a free two-day event that gives children a chance to see what it's like to be a scientist, is taking place this weekend. 

Full of hands-on exhibits and shows, the expo allows children to explore research labs, conduct hundreds of experiments, and even meet a robot named Baxter.

Science center leaders are heading to Tallahassee this week to ask for more STEM education funding. Leaders from the Orlando Science Center are joining the group.

The nearly 500 science centers across the state received about $11 million dollars last year in state dollars though an arts and culture fund. That works out to only a few tens of thousands of dollars for each organization.

UCF Team Wants To Mine The Moon

Feb 2, 2018

Private companies want to mine the moon for water and a team at the University of Central Florida is helping them figure out just how to do that.

Planetary scientists are pretty confident there’s water on the moon and private companies like United Launch Alliance want to jump-start the mining process. Water is an important resource in space because its chemical composition can be split into hydrogen and oxygen, which could then be turned into rocket fuel.

Pint of Science

Pour me another one, bartender...or is it pour me another one, doctor?

For the next three nights, scientists will take over bars in nine countries and 50 cities, including a trio of sold-out Tampa area locations, to discuss their work with the public over drinks.

"Pint of Science" was created four years ago in the United Kingdom, and brought over to the U.S. last year by USF Health Molecular Pharmacology & Physiology Research Associate Parmvir Bahia and her husband, Moffitt Cancer Center researcher David Basanta.

It Takes A 'Forest' To Feed An Elementary School

May 4, 2015
John O'Connor / WLRN

Rain is terrible when you’re trying to give tours of your new garden.

But it’s great for the spinach, sweet potato and purple passion fruit rapidly taking root.

On a very rainy day, Kelsey Pharr Elementary third graders Ronnield Luna and Jeffrey Arroyo are showing grownups around what used to be a grass field.

Now the school in Miami’s Brownsville neighborhood has several thousand square feet of all kinds of fruit and vegetables.

Some you can find at your supermarket.

M. S. Butler

Plenty of kids play in dirt and collect bugs. Maybe you used to bring home bugs in a jar. Maybe you still do.  Deby Cassill does. But, she’s the Associate Professor of biology at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.

So, she spends her days getting a microscopic look at something many of us consider a pest and even something to step on.

She says there was a time when it was considered strange for her to play with bugs.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

This story is part of a series from The Hechinger Report and StateImpact Florida looking at how Florida schools are getting ready for Common Core standards. Read — and listen to — the first two stories here and here.

Pint of Science

Scientists will be putting down the PowerPoint presentation and picking up a cold one at bars around the world next week, including at a quartet of Bay area pubs. 

It's part of the Pint of Science Festival, which launched in the United Kingdom in 2012, and has grown to 21 cities in 6 countries this year.

The Festival encourages scientists to talk about their work in "plain English."