Science

Science
9:10 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Einstein's Lost Theory Discovered ... And It's Wrong

It's OK, kids. Even Albert Einstein sometimes made math mistakes.
Harris & Ewing Library of Congress

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 11:19 am

Earlier this week, physicists announced they'd seen evidence of ripples in the fabric of space and time from just moments after the Big Bang. Such ripples were predicted almost a century ago by Albert Einstein.

Einstein's theory of relativity is arguably the 20th century's greatest idea. But not everything he did was right: Some newly uncovered work from the brilliant physicist was wrong. Really, really wrong.

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Krulwich Wonders
8:13 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Is That Someone's House? What Astronauts Can See Looking Down

NASA

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 12:41 pm

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Science
9:01 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Asteroid Belt May Be Just One Big Melting Pot Of Space Rocks

An artist's concept of a narrow asteroid belt orbiting a star similar to our own sun.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 8:32 am

The asteroid belt, a ring of rubble between Mars and Jupiter, has sometimes been written off as discarded leftovers from the solar system's start. But new research published in the journal Nature shows that the belt actually formed during an unruly later era, when planets themselves were on the move.

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Science
2:06 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

The Battle Against Citrus Greening

A greenhouse at the Citrus Research and Education Center
Credit Robin Sussingham / WUSF

Listen to the story here.

Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam calls citrus greening "as bad a situation as it could possible be for Florida signature crop." That's why the state's citrus farmers have spent more than $60 million of their own money over the last seven years to save their crops. Lake Alfred, in Polk County, is headquarters for intense research efforts to cure citrus greening.

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Science
3:05 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Shuttle Atlantis Lands For Good At Kennedy Space Center

The space shuttle Atlantis, with its cargo arm extended, goes on display today the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Cape Canaveral, Fla.
John Raoux AP

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 6:06 pm

Visitors to the new Atlantis exhibit at the Kennedy Space Center walk into the building under a big orange external fuel tank like the one the shuttle rode into space.

The tank's a replica — but the shuttle inside is the real deal.

People who worked on the shuttle program, like retired technician Tom Boarman, are looking forward to reuniting with Atlantis.

"Well, it will be a very familiar sight to me," Boarman said. "I've seen it on the pad many times — all the shuttles."

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Science
10:17 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Now He Tells Us: 'Tang Sucks,' Says Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin

Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, during the Apollo 11 mission to the moon.
Neil Armstrong/NASA Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:02 am

Hey, we were told in the '60s that we'd grow up to be astronauts if we drank Tang and that our heroes loved it!

But the second man on the moon — Apollo 11's Buzz Aldrin — says "Tang sucks."

TMZ.com broke the news that Aldrin let loose with his real opinion during taping of Spike TV's Guys Choice awards, which airs Thursday at 9 p.m. ET.

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1:17 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Lightning Strike Kills Woman on Belleair Beach

Lead in text: 
Pinellas Sheriff's officials say a Brandon mother was killed by an apparent lightning strike on Belleair Beach Tuesday. Phyllis Kalinowski is the fifth person killed by a lightning strike across the country this year, and the first in Florida.
BELLEAIR BEACH - Pinellas sheriff's deputies were investigating the death of a 51-year-old Brandon woman who apparently died from a lightning strike while at the beach Tuesday evening. Pinellas sheriff's officials said Phyllis Kalinowski had been at the beach all day with a friend.
Science
11:09 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Bill Nelson: NASA to Get $100 Million for Asteroid Project

An astroid colony would bring a new perspective to the issue of suburban flight.
NASA.gov

Senator Bill Nelson explains the asteroid project.

When the White House unveils its fiscal year 2014 budget next week, prepare to have your mind blown. The financial estimate includes about $100 million for something most of us have only imagined.

Are we talking about a lifetime supply of hoagies from Wawa, the trendy convenience store chain that was met with great fanfare when it recently opened its first Tampa Bay locations? Nope. Think bigger... and farther. The money will help human beings get closer to establishing a permanent settlement in space. That's according to U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, who apparently got the inside scoop during a briefing with scientists.

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Science
1:27 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Fossils Found in Polk County Lead to Discovery of Extinct Cat Species

You're looking at the lower jaws of the newly christened Rhizosmilodon fiteae. The 5-million-year-old species was named for Lutz resident Barbara Fite, who donated one of the critical specimens researchers studied.
University of Florida

If Florida is God’s waiting room, then Polk County must be the alcove reserved for his longtime patients.

Researchers have used 5-million-year-old fossils found in Polk County phosphate mines to identify a new genus and species of extinct saber-toothed cat.

Scientists had previously thought the animal's ancestors originated in the Old World and migrated to this side of the pond. But the latest findings, based on fossil acquisitions from the past three decades, make one thing clear: Just like Super Bowl champ Ray Lewis and former Mouseketeer Lindsey Alley, the new species  hails from closer to Polk County.

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Science
4:51 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Grapefruit Hybrid Might Be Safer to Consume

Credit dreamstime.com

Grapefruit lovers who had to do away with the citrus fruit because of effects it had on certain medications have a new found hope. A hybrid grapefruit is in the works.

Grapefruit has a certain way of interacting with some drugs like those used for cancer, the heart, and lowering high cholesterol. The natural chemicals in grapefruits called furanocoumarins, or FCs, don't allow these drugs to break down and may result in an overdose.

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Science
4:40 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Peel Back The Mystery Of "Sea Monsters" At MOSI

Giant Sunfish
Credit Susan Giles Wantuck

This weekend, Tampa's Museum of Science and Industry opens the doors on the world premiere of "Sea Monsters Revealed." 

And if a fisherman told the tale of how big some of these fish are, you would never believe him. 

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Science
4:14 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Does Danica Patrick Have An Edge In The Daytona 500?

Danica Patrick became the first woman to win the No. 1 starting slot at NASCAR's elite level. But will that spot — and her weight advantage — give her an edge in Sunday's Daytona 500?
Jonathan Ferrey Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 12:14 pm

It took Danica Patrick 45.817 seconds to circle the track and win the pole position for the Daytona 500. It'll take about four hours to determine who wins the famed race that starts the Sprint Cup season at 1 p.m. ET Sunday.

By taking the No. 1 slot, Patrick made history as the first woman to win a pole in NASCAR's elite division. And she made some people wonder whether the pole position — and her light weight — might give her an advantage.

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Science
1:27 am
Mon February 11, 2013

To Infinity And Beyond: Would-Be Astronauts Keep Faith In Uncertain Era

A child poses for a picture in front of an astronaut space suit at the Kennedy Space Center on the eve of the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour July 14, 2009 in Cape Canaveral, Fla.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 4:58 pm

Space exploration has stirred imaginations and piloted hopes and dreams, but the future of space travel looks very different from the age in which Neil Armstrong made it to the moon.

Since NASA is no longer doing manned missions, astronaut hopefuls have turned their sites on the private sector.

Private Adventurism

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Science
11:12 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Kennedy Space Center Marks 10th Anniversary of Columbia Disaster

Credit NASA

It's a somber day on Florida's east coast, as Kennedy Space Center holds a Day of Remembrance on the 10-year anniversary of the space shuttle Columbia disaster.

The morning of Feb. 1, 2003, the shuttle Columbia was just 16 minutes from landing when it broke apart in mid-air, killing all seven crew members.

Today at 10 a.m., the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex held a ceremony honoring those lost on the Columbia, as well as on the ill-fated Apollo 1 in 1967 and Challenger in 1986. In a statement on NASA's website, Pres. Barack Obama said of the fallen astronauts, "Right now we are working to fulfill their highest aspirations by pursuing a path in space never seen before, one that will eventually put Americans on Mars."

Last month, NASA released this video tribute to the Columbia crew:

Science
10:36 am
Thu January 3, 2013

'Stand Your Ground' Linked To Increase In Homicides

George Zimmerman (left) and his attorney appear in court for a bond hearing in June. Zimmerman's case sparked a nationwide debate about so-called "stand your ground" laws.
Joe Burbank AP

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 10:54 am

If a stranger attacks you inside your own home, the law has always permitted you to defend yourself. On the other hand, if an altercation breaks out in public, the law requires you to try to retreat. At least, that's what it used to do.

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