Sabal Trail pipeline

Appeals Court Orders Another Look At Pipeline

Aug 23, 2017

A federal appeals court Tuesday ordered regulators to take another look at the environmental impact of a major natural-gas pipeline project, saying that an earlier review did not adequately consider resulting greenhouse-gas emissions at Florida power plants.

A little over a month after the Sabal Trail Pipeline went online, Central Florida residents are reporting foul-smelling leaks. Despite the sulfur-like scent, the structure is not emitting natural gas. But neighbors and naturalists are still concerned about the impacts.

Residents near a stretch of the Sabal Trail Pipeline in Central Florida are reporting the sulfur-like smell of a gas leak. But the company behind the utility says the emissions are from an odorant leak, not from natural gas.

Major Natural Gas Pipeline Starts Operating

Jul 6, 2017

A 515-mile pipeline that will help carry natural gas to Florida Power & Light and Duke Energy Florida power plants has gone into commercial service, backers of the project said Wednesday.

The Sabal Trail Pipeline is scheduled to start up this week, carrying natural gas from Alabama to Central Florida. Federal regulators approved the activation of the project earlier this summer. But environmentalists are worried about potential impacts to the state’s waterways.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

“Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Sabal Trail has got to go…”

About 50 protesters in downtown Tampa in November chanted as they marched up and down Ashley Drive with signs that said "Protect our water" and "Solidarity with Standing Rock." This protest is one of many that have sprung up across Florida since construction began on the Sabal Trail Transmission Pipeline last summer.

Steve Newborn/WUSF News

A 515-mile pipeline is being placed through northern and central Florida. When it's completed, it will supply natural gas from the North and Midwest to power plants throughout the state. And the construction has attracted protesters and fired up neighbors affected by the project.

Some Florida environmental activists are hoping to channel public interest from one pipeline to another, by organizing a series of protests across the state. This year Native American leaders, activists and celebrities staged a months-long protest at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline, spurring the Obama Administration to ultimately halt the project. Some Florida environmentalists are taking inspiration from the Dakota Access protests in their own fight against the Sabal Trail Pipeline

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Charlie Bellofatto stood on Ashley Drive at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park in Tampa with a tambourine in one hand and a sign in the other.

The Tampa resident and Lakota Tribe member sang the Lakota “Four Directions Song” as he protested the Sabal Trail Transmission Pipeline and a crude oil pipeline being built on native land in the Midwest.

Drilling mud from the Sabal Trail pipeline is leaking into the Withlacoochee River in Georgia.  The spill in the Suwannee River tributary could impact the Floridan aquifer.