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Two parents who lost children in February's massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School announced their candidacies for county school board seats Tuesday, saying they want to improve safety and increase accountability.

Tim Fanning / WUSF Public Media

After the deadly school shooting in Parkland, teenage voices rang through the television sets, radios and newspapers of senior citizens in Sun City Center.

On Saturday, some of those seniors are holding a rally to show their support.

WLRN

When Coral Springs police officer Gil Monzon arrived at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School minutes after a gunman unleashed a massacre that killed 17, he says he found two Broward County sheriff's deputies in the parking lot.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

Susana Matta Valdivieso was hiding in a dark classroom when a gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

Madison Vogel had never organized a protest before.

But following the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, the Osceola High School senior got together with 35 other Pinellas County students and created a companion event to a national march against gun violence.

Michele Shapiro

Ignited by the deadly shooting in Parkland, tens of thousands of Tampa Bay area teenagers plan to demonstrate for gun reform on Saturday. Beyond making a statement, many of the students hope to register and mobilize young people to vote.

That’s the main message behind Tampa’s demonstration, which takes place at 10 a.m. at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, said organizer Brooke Shapiro.

Nikolas Cruz was back in a Broward County courtroom Wednesday in front of Circuit Court Judge Elizabeth Scherer. 

With his head down, Cruz sat silent throughout his appearance.

He was indicted by a grand jury last week on 17 charges of premeditated first-degree murder and 17 charges of attempted first-degree murder. Cruz's legal team told the judge that he didn't need to hear his charges read aloud because he already understood them. 

Only 15-year-old victim Luke Hoyer's name was read out loud in the courtroom. 

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This week's Florida Matters features highlights from a recent town hall meeting in Tampa about school safety. The discussion took place in the wake of the school shootings at a high school in Parkland, and focused mainly on violence and gun control. 

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

Since the Parkland school shooting, sixteen-year-old Alex Barrow says Hillsborough High School has an environment of fear.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

The possibility of stricter gun laws loomed large over the first gun show in Tampa Bay since the Parkland school shooting,

When a gunman killed 17 people on Valentine's Day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, many of their classmates didn't grieve in silence, they spoke out.

Urgent teenage voices filled television interviews, social media, even the hallways of Florida's capitol. They have also sparked a debate over gun laws in the aftermath of another school shooting.

WLRN

Two students who survived the Florida school shooting and spoke publicly about it are not "crisis actors," despite the claims of several conspiracy-oriented sites and an aide to a Florida lawmaker.

In the seven days that have followed the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people, students from the Florida campus have moved from terror to grief to activism, inspiring a national youth-led protest against political inaction on gun reform.

On Wednesday, the Parkland students — still mourning and fueled by anger — made their way to the state capitol in Tallahassee to confront lawmakers to demand a ban on assault weapons.

A week after 17 people were killed at a Parkland, Fla., high school, President Trump hosted survivors, parents and teachers from that and other recent school shooting tragedies for an emotional, nearly 90-minute listening session at the White House Wednesday.

Hundreds of students from around the state rallied at the Florida Capitol Wednesday. They joined Parkland students to promote their gun control cause and convince lawmakers to look into what they see as better policies.

Leona Rosado / Land O' Lakes student

While thousands of students were in Tallahassee Wednesday to push for stronger gun laws after last week’s shooting in a high school in Parkland, teenagers across Florida walked out of class in a show of solidarity.

As high school students who survived the shooting in Parkland, Fla., travel to the state Capitol to demand action on guns, lawmakers offered a glimpse of the battle they face.

In Tuesday's session, which opened with prayer for the community of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students and staff were killed last week, Florida House lawmakers declined to open debate on a bill that would ban assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines.

Students who survived the Parkland school shooting prepared to flood the Capitol on Wednesday, pushing to ban the assault-style rifle used to kill 17 people and vowing to make changes in the November election if they can't persuade lawmakers to change laws before their legislative session ends.

Peter Wang, a 15-year-old member of the Junior ROTC who was killed as he tried to help fellow students escape a mass shooting in Parkland, Fla., last week, has been posthumously admitted to the U.S. Military Academy.

Peter and two other freshman cadets, Martin Duque and Alaina Petty, both 14, were also awarded the Medal of Heroism — the highest medal given to Junior Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps cadets.

Classmates and family said that Peter dreamed of attending West Point. The admission to the academy came on the same day as his funeral.

  

As South Florida reels from Wednesday’s mass shooting at a Broward County high school, State Sen. Kathleen Passidomo, R-Naples, is working to secure funding for Florida school districts to better identify and address mental health concerns in students early on. 

In the wake of the deaths of 17 people from a shooting at a Broward High School, people are once again focusing on school safety. Administrators and elected officials alike are pushing for more funding to shore up infrastructure, but some are beginning to wonder if that’s enough.

Governor Rick Scott is calling on the FBI Director to resign after the agency didn’t take action on information received about the 19-year-old who killed 17 people at a South Florida High School.

State lawmakers are facing renewed pressure to pass gun control legislation following last week’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland — and the Legislature is only scheduled to be in session for another two and a half weeks after it returns from the Presidents' Day recess.

State Sen. Gary Farmer, who represents nearby Fort Lauderdale, is pushing the Legislature’s Republican leadership to hear bills he and his Democratic colleagues have introduced in past years.

The warnings around Nikolas Cruz seemed to flash like neon signs: expelled from school, fighting with classmates, a fascination with weapons and hurting animals, disturbing images and comments posted to social media, previous mental health treatment.

Dead bodies were still inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School when survivors of this week's shooting began speaking out about gun violence. It seemed as if the teens had stepped straight from the bullet-scarred school into the nation's gun debate.

President Donald Trump is calling for a focus on mental health and school safety in response to shootings like the one that took 17 lives in Florida, but his budget would cut funding in both areas.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

A vigil and rally against gun violence was held in St. Petersburg's Williams Park Saturday night in response to the mass shooting in Broward County.

As students, staff and parents from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland gathered to grieve and comfort one another Thursday, the former student accused of killing 17 people was charged with murder and had his first appearance in court.

No bail was allowed for Nikolas Cruz, 19.

A Broward County Sheriff's Office report says Cruz confessed to being the shooter at the school.

According to the report, Cruz told interrogating officers that he "began shooting students that he saw in the hallways and on school grounds" Wednesday. 

A proposal that would allow some concealed-weapons license applications to be approved when background checks have not been completed was put on hold Thursday because of the deadly high-school shooting in Broward County.

Chelsea Beck/NPR

President Trump is speaking for the first time about the shooting at a high school in South Florida that left at least 17 people dead. Watch here for a live feed of the President's remarks.

WUSF and NPR will be having continuing coverage here and on WUSF 89.7