LISTEN LIVE

NPR

Thirty years ago, Morning Edition launched what has become an Independence Day tradition: familiar NPR voices reading the Declaration of Independence.

Below is the draft of the Declaration of Independence adopted by the Continental Congress 242 years ago in Philadelphia. It is read by NPR staff members in the accompanying audio.

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show.

Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84.

NPR Host Robert Siegel Signs Off

Jan 6, 2018

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the median number of years that American workers have been working for their current employer is a little over four.

I say that to acknowledge how unusual it is that I have been working at National Public Radio for a little over 40 years — 41, to be precise.

For the past 30 years, I've been doing the same job: hosting All Things Considered. And doing it very happily.

No one is more surprised by my tenure than I am.

U.S. Department of Defense

The #MeToo movement has just been named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” and it’s led to a lot of powerful, important journalism.

But it’s also forced media organizations to look within themselves, because a lot of the accusations are coming from their own newsrooms.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

NPR's senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, has resigned following allegations of sexual harassment from several women.

The accounts of two women, first published by The Washington Post, describe Oreskes unexpectedly kissing them during meetings in the late 1990s, while he was Washington bureau chief for The New York Times. An NPR employee has also come forward publicly about harassment that allegedly occurred during a business meeting-turned-dinner in 2015.

NPR has placed its senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, on leave after fielding accusations that he sexually harassed two women seeking career opportunities nearly two decades ago, when he worked at The New York Times.

NPR

What do you get when you take a renowned NPR host, pair him with an award-winning children's show personality (who happens to be a USF graduate), mix in scientific concepts and creative radio production, throw in a little bit of poop (we'll explain), and blend it well?

You end up with Wow in the World, the first program for children in NPR's 47-year history. 

Jorge Cunha / WUSF TV

NPR commentator and Hall of Fame sportswriter Frank Deford died in Key West over the weekend.

In 2008, he spoke to a group of students from the University of South Florida Saint Petersburg Department of Journalism and Media Studies. He also shared his thoughts with WUSF's University Beat on the "24/7" cycle of both news and sports reporting.

Robert Siegel, whose career with NPR has spanned more than four decades, will be stepping down as co-host of NPR's All Things Considered next year.

One of the most distinctive voices on NPR's airwaves, Siegel will be leaving the host's chair in January 2018. He has hosted the show for 30 years.

NPR’s politics team will be here all night with up-to-the-minute results, news, analysis and updates from around the country.

Mornings on NPR will sound a little different, thanks to a cascade of host changes triggered by Renee Montagne's departure as Morning Edition co-host.

Rachel Martin, currently host of Weekend Edition Sunday, will be joining David Greene and Steve Inskeep as co-host on weekday mornings.

Lulu Garcia-Navarro, NPR's South America correspondent, will be picking up the mantle at Weekend Edition Sunday.

NPR

Recently NPR decided to tweak something on its website.

It wasn’t the look. Instead, the national news organization of which WUSF is a member station, decided to eliminate listeners' comments on stories.

Though the majority of Americans have a primary care doctor, a large number also seek treatment at urgent care centers, statistics show. For many people, the centers have become a bridge between the primary care doctor's office and the hospital emergency room.

The United States has the most advanced health care in the world. There are gleaming medical centers across the country where doctors cure cancers, transplant organs and bring people back from near death.

A series of polls in key states by NPR and its partners finds that more than half of adults in the U.S. believe the Affordable Care Act has either helped the people of their state or has had no effect. Those sentiments are common despite all the political wrangling that continues over the law.

About a third (35 percent) of adults say the law has directly helped the people of their state, while a quarter (27 percent) say it has directly hurt people.

The topics range from knowing our bodies — exploring the mysteries of "lost posture" and how well your ears can pick up audio quality — to stories of our times, such as same-sex marriage and political paranoia. Along the way, we also looked at the lives of girls around the world and handicapped the odds of robots taking your job.

If you had one million dollars to fulfill a wish to change the world, what would you do? This is the question the winner of the annual TED Prize is asked to answer.

We're excited to announce the launch of NPR One for Windows phone and tablet. This launch marks the first time NPR has developed an app for listeners with Windows devices, and we're excited to bring the great new listening experience of NPR One to these listeners.

NPR Launches A New Podcast Directory

Jan 26, 2015

Today, we're rolling out a new podcast directory on NPR.org, and we're excited to have a beautiful new home to showcase all of the podcasts from the NPR family.

Welcome to the first meeting of the Morning Edition Reads book club! Here's how it's going to work: A well-known writer will pick a book he or she loved. We'll all read it. Then, you'll send us your questions about the book. And about a month later, we'll reconvene to talk about the book with the author and the writer who picked it.

Ready? Here we go:

Making Sense of Where We Get Our News

Oct 31, 2014
npr.org

Would you be surprised to learn that liberals and conservatives don't get their news from the same sources?

That's one of the findings in a big Pew Research study called Political Polarization and Media Habits.

Before you say, "Well, duh," Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute's Sense-Making Project says there are some things to be learned from this study.

Ira Glass Declares Craig Kopp 'Normal'

Sep 1, 2014

Ira Glass, the host and creator of This American Life, will be in town Sept. 13 at the Mahaffey Theater in St. Petersburg for “Reinventing Radio: An Evening with Ira Glass.”

Making Sense of NPR One

Aug 4, 2014

There's a new way to listen to national and local NPR programming.

It a mobile app that tailors what you hear to your listening interests.

It's called NPR One.

Is it a game changer for digital news delivery or more like 'some' things considered?

NPR One is our new digital listening app that blends NPR and Member Station news reporting into a rich, localized, on-demand experience. We have been working on this new audio news app for iOS and Android for some time, and now it's your turn to download it and experience public radio made personal.

Margaret Low Smith, a longtime NPR executive who has served as senior vice president for news for three years, is leaving the company to become the president of The Atlantic's live events business.

"Her departure will be felt as profoundly as any in recent memory," NPR Chief Content Officer Kinsey Wilson wrote in a memo to staff Tuesday.

He added that Smith's final day at NPR will be at the end of July. She joined the company in 1982 as an overnight production assistant on Morning Edition.

Wilson added that:

Carl Kasell — the official judge and scorekeeper of the NPR quiz show Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! — is stepping down after more than 60 years in radio. While you'll still hear him from time to time as he eases into the role as scorekeeper emeritus, his final broadcast airs on Saturday and Sunday.

Kasell recently had a cameo on The Simpsons, and since that's the pinnacle of any career, this seemed like a good moment to look back on his many decades in broadcast.

For 30 years, Carl anchored the newscast for Morning Edition, and in 1998 he became Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me's official scorekeeper. His last show will air on May 17. Following that, Carl will become Scorekeeper Emeritus and will continue to record voice mail greetings for our winners. In honor of Carl's last show, Peter Sagal reflects on their years working together.

Presumably, the day I was born was the most important day of my life, but I don't remember that. I do remember the day I met Carl Kasell, though, so that tops my personal list.

Media industry veteran Jarl Mohn will be NPR's new CEO, the organization's board of directors has announced.

Mohn, 62, currently sits on the board of directors at several media organizations, including Scripps Networks Interactive and Web analytics company ComScore. He is also on the boards of KPCC Southern California Public Radio and the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Announcing the hire, Kit Jensen, who chairs NPR's board of directors, said Mohn has "an ability to find nuanced and new ideas." He is slated to start work at NPR on July 1.

After a five-decade career in broadcasting, Carl Kasell announced his retirement on Tuesday.

Carl will record his final broadcast for Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! this spring. He will, however, remain "scorekeeper emeritus" for the show. Before becoming the official scorekeeper for the NPR news quiz show in 1998, Carl anchored the newscast for Morning Edition.

Dolby Photography/NPR

With a generation of aging Baby Boomers, there's fertile ground for news stories. That's where NPR's Ina Jaffe comes in.  She is NPR's national correspondent, covering the aging beat and its myriad subjects from housing to technology to age discrimination.  

Pages