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Making Sense of the Media

Anthony Crider via Flickr

NPR recently received a firestorm of criticism for the way it handled an interview with the leader of a recent Unite the Right rally in Washington D.C. And it’s raising questions about how and why newsrooms make decisions about covering controversial sources.

Snopes.com

We've all gotten an email or seen something online that seems a bit fishy.

Some people take the bait, but some check it out and often rely on a well-known online mythbuster called Snopes.com.

Flickr

The most famous crossword puzzle in the world may belong to the New York Times. For more than 75 years, vocabulary junkies have been grabbing the paper and a pencil and taking a stab at the grid of empty squares.

Twitter

The internet is talking this week about the death of 80-year-old Kathleen Dehmlow and her obituary in the Redwood Falls Minnesota Gazette, which was written and paid for by the woman’s own children.

In just 100 words, this tribute turned from announcement to anger, as it revealed a 60-year-old infidelity, and adult children who believe “the world is a better place without her.”

CrowdsOnDemand.com

Protests are a staple of American democracy, but some journalism experts are worried about a recent story out of New Orleans, where a handful of paid actors attended a city council meeting about a controversial power plant.

Buzzfeed

Videos are an effective media known for its power to illicit emotion. And media consumers are learning the hard way that the images don’t have to be real to be convincing.

Nick Youngson / Creative Commons

At a time when the public’s trust of the media is on the decline, some local and national journalists with potential conflicts of interest are finding themselves in the spotlight.

CLTampa.com

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg had his marathon chat with members of Congress. And there was a firestorm over local TV stations owned by Sinclair Media all reading the same script about “fake news.”

But lost in all that media news is a significant shift in the local media landscape in Tampa Bay.

Permission of Brian Solis www.briansolis.com / via Flickr

The world’s most popular social media network is in big trouble.

In less than two weeks, Facebook has watched its stock drop $90 billion - almost 20 percent of its value. The Federal Trade Commission is investigating the company, and founder Mark Zuckerberg has been summoned by Congress and the British Parliament to answer allegations that Facebook shared user data without permission.

The Washington Post

Being a journalist isn’t glamorous. For some, it’s incredibly dangerous.

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian understands this well, and it’s why he’s the voice behind a new project at the newspaper.

WestLouis.org

Scroll through your social media feed, and you’re going to notice certain ads pop up with quirky-named stores like Timbuk 2 or West Louis pushing really cool-looking products.

These ads are a weird new part of the global internet economy where the company doesn’t own the product. You’re buying stuff from middlemen who spend their time creating ads for social media.

YouTube

Sexual assault survivors are speaking out more and more, from the #MeToo movement to the heart-wrenching testimony of 150 young women who testified at the sentencing hearing of USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar.

GOP.com

President Donald Trump finally announced his Fake News Awards this week, months after suggesting that he wanted to give a trophy to the journalist he felt was the most dishonest in coverage of his administration.

Wikimedia Commons

The Washington D.C. media is going nuts over a new book about President Donald Trump, starting when an excerpt was released just a few days ago.

Wikimedia Commons

It’s been a crazy year in the media, and one in which journalists found their credibility constantly challenged. 

U.S. Department of Defense

The #MeToo movement has just been named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” and it’s led to a lot of powerful, important journalism.

But it’s also forced media organizations to look within themselves, because a lot of the accusations are coming from their own newsrooms.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

NPR's senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, has resigned following allegations of sexual harassment from several women.

The accounts of two women, first published by The Washington Post, describe Oreskes unexpectedly kissing them during meetings in the late 1990s, while he was Washington bureau chief for The New York Times. An NPR employee has also come forward publicly about harassment that allegedly occurred during a business meeting-turned-dinner in 2015.

NPR has placed its senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, on leave after fielding accusations that he sexually harassed two women seeking career opportunities nearly two decades ago, when he worked at The New York Times.

Albumarium

The internet is an enormous blessing and curse for the media. It’s provided an immediate, worldwide outlet for news organizations to share their stories.

But, it’s also an unstable business environment where companies are struggling to make money from an audience that wants and expects to get the news for free.

Wikimedia Commons

The New York Times recently exposed movie mogul Harvey Weinstein for his sexual harassment of women for decades. This week, the country’s paper of record announced a new editor, dedicated to leading coverage of gender issues. More specifically: women.

It comes at a time when there’s been a flurry of news stories about powerful men and powerful companies harassing women, discriminating against them and otherwise making work life miserable.

Twitter founder and CEO Jack Dorsey blew up his social media platform this week by introducing the possibility that the company may double how much users can say in one tweet.

And if an ongoing beta test of the new 280-character limit works as the social media company hopes, all of the estimated 328 million people with Twitter accounts could be waxing poetic a lot more.

YouTube

It’s been nearly a week since Hurricane Harvey reached the Texas coast and news from the devastation continues to consume the news cycle and our social media feeds.

But one thing that’s clear is that the dramatic way the flooding is unfolding -- and how people around Houston are communicating with one another - is completely changing the way we’re seeing and hearing the stories of natural disasters.

A Twitter profile called “Yes, You’re Racist” is asking the Internet to help identify people who participated in the marches in Charlottesville, Virginia and are believed to be white nationalists.

The result of this citizen brigade: some of the marchers are being named, threatened, and some are losing their jobs.

Wikimedia Commons

Last week, a colorful rant by the short-lived White House Communications Director left media across the country and world scrambling to figure out what to do with some pretty vulgar words.

Wikimedia Commons

Over the past two years, there’s been a small wave of press freedom laws passing across the country. And they’re all focused on student press freedom.

City of Orlando

It’s been a year since 49 people died in a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando.

It happened in a city best known as a wholesome family vacation destination, but one that has also unofficially been host for the past 25 years to Disney’s Gay Days. That event attracts about 150,000 people a year to local attractions, hotels, restaurants and clubs.

These days, the barrage of news coming from Washington DC includes a lot that's being leaked to the media via anonymous sources. President Donald Trump and a number of lawmakers are saying the leaks are not just dangerous - they're illegal.

And now, there's been an arrest.

CNN.com

News of a suicide bomber outside a pop concert in Manchester, England earlier this week horrified us.

As expected, cable news shows and online publications responded right away – piecing some of the breaking news story together using a slew of social media.

One result was an endless loop of cell phone videos on our computers and TVs from victims at the event.

Wikipedia Commons

It’s been a crazy week for journalists.

The FBI director was fired and he learned about it from the media.

WikiTribune.com

Two of the world’s best-known technology companies are asking their online audience to boost the credibility of information on the internet.

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