Making Sense of the Media

Wikimedia Commons

Last week, a colorful rant by the short-lived White House Communications Director left media across the country and world scrambling to figure out what to do with some pretty vulgar words.

Wikimedia Commons

Over the past two years, there’s been a small wave of press freedom laws passing across the country. And they’re all focused on student press freedom.

City of Orlando

It’s been a year since 49 people died in a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando.

It happened in a city best known as a wholesome family vacation destination, but one that has also unofficially been host for the past 25 years to Disney’s Gay Days. That event attracts about 150,000 people a year to local attractions, hotels, restaurants and clubs.

These days, the barrage of news coming from Washington DC includes a lot that's being leaked to the media via anonymous sources. President Donald Trump and a number of lawmakers are saying the leaks are not just dangerous - they're illegal.

And now, there's been an arrest.

CNN.com

News of a suicide bomber outside a pop concert in Manchester, England earlier this week horrified us.

As expected, cable news shows and online publications responded right away – piecing some of the breaking news story together using a slew of social media.

One result was an endless loop of cell phone videos on our computers and TVs from victims at the event.

Wikipedia Commons

It’s been a crazy week for journalists.

The FBI director was fired and he learned about it from the media.

WikiTribune.com

Two of the world’s best-known technology companies are asking their online audience to boost the credibility of information on the internet.

Pulitzers.org

This week, the annual Pulitzer Prizes were announced.

And while critics like President Trump may call it a celebration of the “failing” media, the announcement really was what it’s always been: a recognition of remarkable journalism.

CaitlynJenner.com

The Associated Press made news right here in Tampa Bay recently, when leaders announced at the American Society of Copy Editors convention a change to a longtime piece of language.

CNN

There seems to be no shortage of opinionated voices in today’s media.

On cable TV, where pundits and politicians seem to spar around the clock, you could say it's overwhelming. But that’s not the case for American newspapers, where opinion pages are becoming endangered.

Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

FBI Archives

No one wants to be arrested. But fact is it happens every day - to people who deserve it - and some who are just good folk caught up in a bad situation.

While people in that latter category may see the charges against them dropped, they’ll still have a memento of their night in jail: a mugshot automatically published on the internet for the entire world to see.

ProPublica and Cotton Bureau

This is not breaking news. President Donald Trump hates the news media.

Even his top aides are keeping the heat on. Advisor Kellyanne Conway is suggesting that media organizations start firing some journalists for what she calls dishonest and embarrassing work.

Pixabay

As of today, there’s a new President of the United States. And the new Commander in Chief’s already testy relationship with the news media means it’s pretty clear that the press will never be the same.

Flickr

The hottest gadget this holiday season is getting attention it may not want.

Amazon's Echo is a voice- activated smart speaker that in a soothing – yet somewhat robotic way - plays music, shares the news and weather and answers even the most inane questions when anyone near the device says a key word - usually the name 'Alexa.'

Diane Rehm is wrapping up a public radio career spanning more than four decades and thousands of episodes. Her talk show has originated at Washington, D.C.'s WAMU and is heard by nearly 3 million people across the country weekly on NPR stations.

Yet The Diane Rehm Show almost didn't get off the ground.

In 1979, Rehm started as a host with a program aimed at homemakers. Several years later, she informed her boss that she had other plans.

Twitter

When news broke a few days ago about the assassination of the Russian Ambassador to Turkey at photo exhibit in Ankara, a handful of journalists who happened to be there captured the shooting with graphic photos and video.

And within hours, images of that shooting were leading newscasts and filling social media feeds around the world.

Pixabay

There’s an interesting term popping up in media reports lately: dog whistle.

It's a metaphor for talking in a way that a small group of people hear one that is hidden below the surface message, said Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.

New words and phrases are forever showing up in our conversations – and in our media. And when it comes to politics, the word choice journalists make can be overly generalized, polarizing or just plain wrong.

Albuminarium

If you've been paying attention lately, there's been a lot of talk about how many media organizations relied a little too much on flawed polling and survey data in predicting outcomes.

With that in mind, we're still going to throw caution to the wind and look at some new data that helps break down how Americans seem so divided.

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