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Making Sense of the Media

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The #MeToo movement has just been named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” and it’s led to a lot of powerful, important journalism.

But it’s also forced media organizations to look within themselves, because a lot of the accusations are coming from their own newsrooms.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

NPR's senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, has resigned following allegations of sexual harassment from several women.

The accounts of two women, first published by The Washington Post, describe Oreskes unexpectedly kissing them during meetings in the late 1990s, while he was Washington bureau chief for The New York Times. An NPR employee has also come forward publicly about harassment that allegedly occurred during a business meeting-turned-dinner in 2015.

NPR has placed its senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, on leave after fielding accusations that he sexually harassed two women seeking career opportunities nearly two decades ago, when he worked at The New York Times.

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The internet is an enormous blessing and curse for the media. It’s provided an immediate, worldwide outlet for news organizations to share their stories.

But, it’s also an unstable business environment where companies are struggling to make money from an audience that wants and expects to get the news for free.

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The New York Times recently exposed movie mogul Harvey Weinstein for his sexual harassment of women for decades. This week, the country’s paper of record announced a new editor, dedicated to leading coverage of gender issues. More specifically: women.

It comes at a time when there’s been a flurry of news stories about powerful men and powerful companies harassing women, discriminating against them and otherwise making work life miserable.

Twitter founder and CEO Jack Dorsey blew up his social media platform this week by introducing the possibility that the company may double how much users can say in one tweet.

And if an ongoing beta test of the new 280-character limit works as the social media company hopes, all of the estimated 328 million people with Twitter accounts could be waxing poetic a lot more.

YouTube

It’s been nearly a week since Hurricane Harvey reached the Texas coast and news from the devastation continues to consume the news cycle and our social media feeds.

But one thing that’s clear is that the dramatic way the flooding is unfolding -- and how people around Houston are communicating with one another - is completely changing the way we’re seeing and hearing the stories of natural disasters.

A Twitter profile called “Yes, You’re Racist” is asking the Internet to help identify people who participated in the marches in Charlottesville, Virginia and are believed to be white nationalists.

The result of this citizen brigade: some of the marchers are being named, threatened, and some are losing their jobs.

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Last week, a colorful rant by the short-lived White House Communications Director left media across the country and world scrambling to figure out what to do with some pretty vulgar words.

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Over the past two years, there’s been a small wave of press freedom laws passing across the country. And they’re all focused on student press freedom.

City of Orlando

It’s been a year since 49 people died in a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando.

It happened in a city best known as a wholesome family vacation destination, but one that has also unofficially been host for the past 25 years to Disney’s Gay Days. That event attracts about 150,000 people a year to local attractions, hotels, restaurants and clubs.

These days, the barrage of news coming from Washington DC includes a lot that's being leaked to the media via anonymous sources. President Donald Trump and a number of lawmakers are saying the leaks are not just dangerous - they're illegal.

And now, there's been an arrest.

CNN.com

News of a suicide bomber outside a pop concert in Manchester, England earlier this week horrified us.

As expected, cable news shows and online publications responded right away – piecing some of the breaking news story together using a slew of social media.

One result was an endless loop of cell phone videos on our computers and TVs from victims at the event.

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It’s been a crazy week for journalists.

The FBI director was fired and he learned about it from the media.

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Two of the world’s best-known technology companies are asking their online audience to boost the credibility of information on the internet.

Pulitzers.org

This week, the annual Pulitzer Prizes were announced.

And while critics like President Trump may call it a celebration of the “failing” media, the announcement really was what it’s always been: a recognition of remarkable journalism.

CaitlynJenner.com

The Associated Press made news right here in Tampa Bay recently, when leaders announced at the American Society of Copy Editors convention a change to a longtime piece of language.

CNN

There seems to be no shortage of opinionated voices in today’s media.

On cable TV, where pundits and politicians seem to spar around the clock, you could say it's overwhelming. But that’s not the case for American newspapers, where opinion pages are becoming endangered.

Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

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No one wants to be arrested. But fact is it happens every day - to people who deserve it - and some who are just good folk caught up in a bad situation.

While people in that latter category may see the charges against them dropped, they’ll still have a memento of their night in jail: a mugshot automatically published on the internet for the entire world to see.

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