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march for our lives

False fire alarms at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have been triggering memories of a mass shooting that killed 17 on Valentine's Day.

PolitiFact Florida

March for Our Lives Tampa is hosting a concert Saturday aimed at getting young people to vote in November. Bands And Ballots is part of the national voter-education and registration drive that began in June by student survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. 

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

More young people in Florida are registering to vote ahead of the midterm elections,  motivated by the February school shooting in Parkland.

In the battle over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, the usual suspects are lining up in support and opposition. At the grass roots, however, there is one new entry nervously eyeing the Kavanaugh nomination. It is March For Our Lives, started by high school students in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting there, and aimed ultimately at enacting more effective gun regulations.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

On the five-month anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, some of the students brought their "Road to Change" bus tour to Tampa.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Supporters gathered in downtown St. Petersburg Thursday to welcome survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. The voter registration and gun violence awareness event at Williams Park was part of the March For Our Lives "Road to Change" bus tour.   

Cathy Carter

A crowd of 200 filled Selby Library auditorium in Sarasota Wednesday night for a town hall featuring students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Hundreds more were unable to get a seat after the hall reached capacity.

This summer, students involved in the March For Our Lives movement are traveling across the country to energize young people. Local organizers say they want to educate and encourage them to vote.   

Student activists from a high school that suffered a mass shooting have kicked off a March for Our Lives Florida bus tour, where they plan to visit all 27 of the state's Congressional districts.

Students at more than 1,000 schools across the country are registering young voters in lunchrooms, hallways and even at upcoming graduation ceremonies in a week of activism aimed at electing lawmakers who support gun reforms in response to school shootings in Florida and Texas.

Survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, took to social media to express outrage and heartbreak in the aftermath of the Friday school shooting in Texas, where authorities say a gunman opened fire, killing 10 people.

Courtesy of Brooke Shapiro

On the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting, students across the Tampa Bay area participated in Friday’s National Student Walkout.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

Susana Matta Valdivieso was hiding in a dark classroom when a gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

Local governments in Florida can't regulate guns and city leaders who don’t abide by state law can face up to a $5,000 fine or removal from office.

In the aftermath of the massive outpouring of support at the "March for Our Lives" in Washington, D.C., and around the country, South Florida students, parents and legislators launched a new organization Wednesday called 17 For Change, to maintain the momentum of the gun control movement.

Steve Newborn / WUSF Public Media

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Tampa Congresswoman Kathy Castor spoke at a forum of high school students and school board members in Tampa Monday. He told the students to keep on demonstrating for gun control -- but be prepared if little happens.

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

Madison Vogel had never organized a protest before.

But following the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, the Osceola High School senior got together with 35 other Pinellas County students and created a companion event to a national march against gun violence.

Michele Shapiro

Ignited by the deadly shooting in Parkland, tens of thousands of Tampa Bay area teenagers plan to demonstrate for gun reform on Saturday. Beyond making a statement, many of the students hope to register and mobilize young people to vote.

That’s the main message behind Tampa’s demonstration, which takes place at 10 a.m. at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, said organizer Brooke Shapiro.