immigration

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

U.S. District Court Judge Derrick K. Watson has issued a nationwide temporary restraining order, preventing President Trump's revised travel ban from taking effect at midnight Wednesday. Trump's executive order would have temporarily halted the U.S. refugee program and travel from six Muslim-majority countries.

Legislation banning sanctuary city policies is moving through Florida House committees. The proposal requires cities fully cooperate with federal immigration officers or face penalties.

In a field near Florida City, zucchini pickers are filling bushel basket after bushel basket as irrigation trucks shoot geysers into the sky behind them. Many if not most are Mexican and Central American. Many if not most are undocumented immigrants.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

A boardroom in the University of South Florida’s Muma College of Business may be the last place you expect a leader of a European country to turn up – but that’s been the case twice in the last four months.

Urban Ahlin is the Speaker of the Swedish Parliament.

Florida Republican lawmakers are pushing punitive immigrant and refugee legislation once again this session. Similar proposals died last year. But the 2016 campaign season may be stimulating an appetite for change.

When it comes to fear of being deported, immigration attorney Mayra Joli, gives her clients a checklist: Do they have an order of removal? Have they committed any crimes? Are they working on their case?

“If your answers are two no’s and one yes, you have nothing to worry about,” Joli says. “Just go back to sleep. And let me sleep.”

115th U.S. Congress

Rep. Charlie Crist spoke out against President Donald Trump’s controversial immigration order during a conference on world affairs in St. Petersburg.


The Florida House is moving forward with a plan to pull out of the refugee resettlement program.

Do you know where your congressional delegates stand on president Donald Trump's immigration order? 

Florida Governor Rick Scott and President Donald Trump are political allies. But Scott is refusing to say what his position is on the president’s travel ban.

Julio Ochoa/WUSF

Two of the 27 plaintiffs in a lawsuit against President Trump's executive order temporarily banning some immigrants from coming to the United States are from Florida.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations is suing President Donald Trump over his travel ban. The ban restricts refugees and travelers from certain Muslim-majority countries.

A Capital City immigration law attorney is recommending refugees affected by President Donald Trump’s travel ban stay in the U.S., if they can. She also has a warning for people who came to the U.S. from other countries.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Students and faculty at the University of South Florida Tampa campus gathered Monday to protest President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration.

Immigration Order Protests Continue In Tampa, Across U.S.

Jan 29, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Protests continued on Sunday in the Tampa Bay area and across the U.S. after President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily barring citizens from seven largely Muslim countries, as well as all refugees, from entering the country. 

That order was blocked in part by a federal judge.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

The "wet foot, dry foot" policy is over. For more than 20 years, Cubans migrating to the U.S. enjoyed that special privilege, which meant if they made it to dry land here they could stay. President Barack Obama ended it on Thursday– and even most Cubans here agree with him.

President Bill Clinton created the wet foot-dry foot policy in 1995 as a way to appease both the Cuban government and Cuban exile leaders. But since then it’s become a controversial rule that many Cuban-Americans say is antiquated now that the U.S. and Cuba have normalized relations.

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is ending a longstanding immigration policy that allows any Cuban who makes it to U.S. soil to stay and become a legal resident, a senior administration official said Thursday.

Immigration—or immigration enforcement—has been a signature issue for President-elect Donald Trump. One policy he has vowed to repeal is DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives about 750,000 young immigrants the ability to work and go to college here in the U.S. 

Quincy Walters / WUSF News

In 2012, President Obama issued an executive order called the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA -- giving amnesty to children brought into the United States illegally with their families.

And during the campaign, President-Elect Donald Trump said he'll "immediately terminate" two of Obama's executive orders concerning immigration -- one of them being DACA.


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