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health insurance

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

While across the nation the cultural and political tug-of-war over health care rages on, locally, healers keep on healing. But providing care for people can get complicated when they don’t have health insurance.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently hosted a town hall event in St. Petersburg about providing health care to the uninsured. We're taking another listen to highlights from the panel discussion and questions from the audience on this week's episode.


State Workers Hand Over Papers For Health Coverage

Apr 27, 2018

More than 1,800 people have been removed from the state-employee health insurance program after Gov. Rick Scott’s administration started requiring workers to fork over tax documents and their children’s birth certificates to verify that family members qualify for coverage.

If you're like a lot of Floridians and get your health insurance through an employer, some of your health care decisions may be made for you before you ever set foot in a doctor's office, hospital or lab.
 

About 42 percent of Floridians have health insurance through an employer-sponsored plan. That means somebody has made big choices on your behalf. Choosing an employer-based health insurance plan decides the network -- essentially the list of doctors and facilities available to you at negotiated rates.

Members of Congress have said they want to loosen rules for health savings accounts. Did they do it in the latest spending bill? Do people who were uncovered for one month in 2017 owe a tax penalty? And how can immigrants who move to the U.S. to retire get insurance? These are the questions I'm tackling for readers this week:

I heard that health savings account rules would be loosened under the new spending bill passed by Congress last month. Did that happen?

No. In fact, the standards have become slightly tighter this year.

House Panel Sides With Doctors On Insurance Claims

Feb 15, 2018

A bill that would restrict the ability of health insurers and HMOs to retroactively deny claims passed the House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday, scoring a victory for physicians.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

While across the nation the cultural and political tug-of-war over health care rages on, locally, healers keep on healing. But providing care for people can get complicated when they don’t have health insurance.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently hosted a town hall event in St. Petersburg about providing health care to the uninsured. We'll hear highlights from the panel discussion and questions from the audience on this week's episode.


There is a card in Joost Sajet’s wallet that looks like any other health insurance card—plan name, policyholder, group number, a hotline number for providers—but what Sajet presents to his doctors is not normal insurance.

 

That’s because Sajet is fed up with normal insurance.

Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

What’s The Solution? Delivering Health Care To Uninsured Floridians

For the past six months Health News Florida has told the stories of people without insurance who use free clinics throughout the Tampa Bay area. Now we’re inviting the community to take part in that conversation during a special taping of Florida Matters. Join us for a panel discussion on providing care to the uninsured.

Florida lawmakers are looking to ensure genetic tests won’t affect eligibility for insurance coverage. The House Health and Human Services Committee unanimously passed a measure preventing insurance companies from using genetic information when making policy decisions.

AHCA Extends Deadline On Database Rule

Jan 5, 2018

The Agency for Health Care Administration agreed Thursday to extend by one week the deadline for health-insurance companies and HMOs to submit comments to the state on a proposed rule for a new all-payers claims database.

Florida is looking to make major changes to Children’s Medical Services, the state-run health care program for children with complex medical needs.

Congress again failed to approve long-term funds for a popular program that provides health insurance for nearly 9 million low-income children, leaving each party blaming the other for Christmas-season gridlock and states scrambling to decide how to parcel out dwindling money.

Daylina Miller / WUSF News

Musician Dave Eichenberger is on his computer at his New Port Richey studio uploading a headshot to Goggle4U's website so he can virtually try on a pair of fuchsia eyeglasses.

Let’s say you have health insurance through your employer and live in one of 21 states with laws protecting consumers against surprise medical bills from out-of-network providers.

Should one of those unwanted bills land in your mailbox, you can turn to your state law and regulators for help, right?

Not necessarily.

House Starts Moving Again On 'Direct Primary Care'

Nov 15, 2017

A House health care panel on Tuesday approved a bill backing “direct primary care” contracts that would allow physicians to bill patients and collect payments in advance of providing care without having to obtain an insurance license.

Senate Moves Again On Health Insurance Changes

Nov 8, 2017

Physicians would have greater leeway in prescribing medications to patients, and insurance companies would have less time to approve prior-authorization requests under a bill unanimously approved by a Senate panel Tuesday.

House Tax Bill Would Scrap Deduction For Medical Expenses

Nov 3, 2017

The tax bill unveiled by Republicans in the House on Thursday would not, as had been rumored, eliminate the tax penalty for failure to have health insurance. But it would eliminate a decades-old deduction for people with very high medical costs.

The 2018 annual open-enrollment period for coverage on the health insurance marketplaces starts Wednesday. But if you don’t take care of lingering issues from your past coverage, they may come back to haunt you when you try to sign up this fall.

Unpaid Premiums

New rules will allow some insurers to require you to pay any back premiums you owe for the 12 months prior to the effective date of your new coverage.

Latinos, who just a year ago were highly sought customers for the Affordable Care Act’s marketplace plans may not get the same hard sell this year.

Bipartisan Plan To Curb Health Premiums Gets Strong Support

Oct 20, 2017

A bipartisan proposal to calm churning health insurance markets gained momentum Thursday when enough lawmakers rallied behind it to give it potentially unstoppable Senate support. But its fate remained unclear as some Republicans sought changes that could threaten Democratic backing.

As many as 2,000 obese state employees who suffer from conditions such as diabetes or hypertension can enroll online for a program that provides coverage for treatment and management of obesity and related conditions.

Recent efforts in Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare are overshadowing an important deadline to fund children's health insurance.

A mild stroke sent St. Petersburg resident Lori Ngo to the hospital in May.

She was feeling a pain in her leg, but didn't think much of it.

Top Senate Republicans say their last-ditch push to uproot former President Barack Obama's health care law is gaining momentum. But they have less than two weeks to succeed and face a tough fight to win enough GOP support to reverse the summer's self-inflicted defeat on the party's high-priority issue.

A popular federal-state program that provides health coverage to millions of children in lower- and middle-class families is up for renewal Sept. 30.


Affirming its disdain for "Obamacare," the Trump administration on Thursday announced sharp cuts in programs promoting health care enrollment under the Affordable Care Act for next year.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Tampa Congresswoman Kathy Castor are asking the federal government to step in after thousands of kids were kicked off a state Medicaid program. The two Democrats sent a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price earlier this week.


The government will make this month's payments to insurers under the Obama-era health care law that President Donald Trump still wants to repeal and replace, a White House official said Wednesday.

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