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hazing

Hafsa Quraishi / WUSF Public Media

Students at the University of South Florida held a moment of silence and were asked to sign a pledge to take measures to prevent hazing, just days after another state university temporarily banned Greek life due to the death of a fraternity pledge.

Group Of Lawyers Backing Challenge To Anti-Hazing Law

Jun 26, 2017

A statewide organization of criminal defense attorneys wants to support a former Florida A&M University band member in his challenge to the constitutionality of a state anti-hazing law.

Coach: Private School Baseball Players Suspended For Hazing

Mar 6, 2017
Inspiration Academy

The baseball coach at a private school in Bradenton says he suspended at least 15 players after an incident of locker-room hazing.

Champion family photo

Florida A&M University reached a $1.1 million settlement Friday with the family of a drum major who died after being hazed by fellow band members.

The university agreed to name the marching band's anti-hazing program after Robert Champion as well as place a memorial plaque dedicated to Champion on campus under the terms of the agreement reached with Champion's parents, according to settlement documents. Of the $1.1 million, $800,000 will be paid by an insurance company and $300,000 will be paid by the state Department of Financial Services.

A former Florida A&M University band member was sentenced Friday to four years in prison for his role in a drum major's hazing death.

Judge Marc Lubet announced the sentence for 26-year-old Caleb Jackson, who pleaded no contest to manslaughter and hazing in April 2013 for his part in the death of Robert Champion, of Decatur, Georgia.

Trustees at Florida A&M University turned to an outsider - and the school's first female president - to lead them out of the turmoil that followed the hazing death of a Marching 100 drum major. But 18 months later the historic school is facing a new crisis marked by allegations of harassment and insubordination - and complaints from politicians.

Jury Convicts Final Three Defendants In FAMU Hazing Case

Apr 26, 2015

An Orlando jury has handed down hazing and manslaughter convictions to the final three defendants in the death of a Florida A&M University marching band drum major. The verdict brings a three and a half year old legal saga to a close.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon, which had its chapter at the University of Oklahoma shut down after video surfaced showing fraternity brothers singing a song containing racial slurs, has had problems at chapters throughout Florida in the past.

Dante Martin has been sentenced to six years in prison for his role in the 2011 hazing death of a Florida A&M University band drum major. Martin is the second person to get jail time in the hazing death of Robert Champion.

Robert Champion died in November 2011 after he was beaten in a hazing ritual following a football game in Orlando. A judge ruled Dante Martin was the ringleader of the hazing ritual. 9-1-1 calls sent immediately after Champion collapsed reveal the severity of the situation:

Florida A & M University's Marching 100 had played at a Super Bowl and before U.S. presidents. But one of the nation's most-celebrated marching bands had a dark secret: members were occasionally beaten with mallets, fists and drumsticks in a hazing initiation known as "crossing" Bus C.

The four remaining defendants in the hazing death of a Florida A&M University marching band drum major are about to go on trial, and their attorneys argue what happened to Robert Champion was part of a contest.

Defense attorneys are making a case that Florida's anti-hazing law is so vague that what happened to Champion wasn't hazing but part of a contest.

 

The defense is asking a judge for a hearing challenging the anti-hazing law. Circuit Judge Rene Roche set a hearing a week before the defendants' Oct. 27 trial.

A former Florida A&M band member could become the first to be sentenced to jail time for his role in the hazing death of a drum major.

Jessie Baskin faces nine years when sentenced Friday for participating in the beating death of Robert Champion in November 2011 during a hazing ritual aboard a bus parked outside an Orlando hotel.

In his first interview since the Miami Dolphins suspended him, Richie Incognito says his words to Jonathan Martin sound harsh, but that's not the way he meant them.

"My actions were coming from a place of love," he told Fox NFL Sunday. "No matter how bad and how vulgar it sounds, that's how we communicate, that's how our friendship was, and those are the facts and that's what I'm accountable for."

Here are three new stories to read if you're following what happened between Miami Dolphins linemen Richie Incognito and Jonathan Martin — and the uproar because of allegations that Martin was bullied or that Incognito is being unfairly accused:

-- "Incognito and Martin: An Insider's Story"

Over the last few days, the sports media has been transfixed by the story of Jonathan Martin and Richie Incognito, two burly offensive lineman who play for the Miami Dolphins. Martin, a 24-year-old, second-year pro, abruptly walked away from the team last week after an incident with Incognito, 30, his frequent tormentor and the offensive line's unofficial leader.

The Miami Dolphins have suspended a veteran player indefinitely, after he allegedly sent threatening messages that included racial slurs to a younger teammate. The NFL is investigating what is being called a case of hazing and harassment.

Veteran guard Richie Incognito is alleged to have left intimidating messages and texts on the phone of second-year offensive tackle Jonathan Martin, who left the team last week. The Dolphins had not previously provided details to explain Martin's absence.

The interim president of Florida A&M University has lifted the suspension of the renowned Marching 100 band a year and a half after a drum major was beaten to death with fists and band instruments in a hazing incident.

The Associated Press reports FAMU's Interim President Larry Robinson announced the band's reinstatement Thursday. The scandal that followed the November 2011 hazing death of drum major Robert Champion led to the retirement of famed band director Julian White and also played a role in the resignation of former university president James Ammons.

Prosecutors are charging 12 former Florida A&M University band members with manslaughter in the 2011 hazing death of a drum major.

The president of Florida A&M University submitted his resignation today - the same day the university was sued by parents of a drum major who died during a hazing.

James Ammons announced the resignation, which takes effect Oct. 11, in a letter to the chairman of the university's governing board. He said his decision came after "considerable thought, introspection and conversations with my family."