Haiti

The six-month extension of Temporary Protected Status for Haitians began over the weekend, and ends in January of 2018. 

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly visited Port-au-Prince Wednesday to meet with Haitian President Jovenel Moise. The visit came after Kelly recommended a 6-month extension for Haitian Temporary Protected Status in May. Haitian activists and advocates had been pushing for at least an 18-month extension to the policy that protects them from deportation. 

At a National Hurricane Center press conference in Miami after the visit, Kelly said he encourages Haitians to remember it was never meant to be a permanent solution.

Immigration lawyers and Haitian community activists hosted a social media live event on Monday to stress the necessity for recipients of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to gather their documents and contact a local immigration lawyer if they want to stay in the United States after the program's deadline in January.

“The first things that people really need to do is get an attorney, get a consultation – at least a consultation with an attorney,” said Vanessa Joseph, immigration attorney, on a Facebook Live event watched by 42,000 people and shared 842 times. 

Florida’s Haitian immigrants are getting a six month reprieve on deportation orders. Advocates are claiming a small victory, but the timeline falls short of what many hoped for. Some are worried the community’s special status may be coming to an end.

A Florida lawmaker is criticizing the federal government’s temporary extension of special status for Haitian immigrants. After the 2010 earthquake, the federal government allowed thousands of Haitians to take refuge in the U.S. This week President Donald Trump extended those protections again, but by six months, not the eighteen months advocates hoped for.

Thousands of Haitians that are under Temporary Protected Status (TPS)  in the United States  since the 2010 earthquake in the island received on Monday a six month reprieve, in what many advocates and activists in South Florida fear is the last extension of the immigration program. 

Marleine Bastien, director of  FANM or Haitian Women of Miami,  says it seems like this is six-month notice for Haitians to prepare to leave the country. 

COMMENTARY

Is the presidential candidate who threw promises to Little Haiti throwing a dragnet over it now that he’s President?

Candidate Donald Trump pledged to Haitian-American voters here that he’d be their “greatest champion.” But the Associated Press reports the Trump Administration is fishing for criminals among Haitian immigrants – specifically the 50,000 Haitians living in the U.S. under Temporary Protected Status, or TPS.

On Thursday, the U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to pull its peacekeeping troops out of Haiti. But it seems few Haitians will be sad to see them go.

The U.N. peacekeepers arrived in Haiti in 2004 to bring order to violent chaos after the overthrow of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. And for a while, the more than 2,000 U.N. soldiers did that.

Help Needed To Send Meals To Children In Haiti

Dec 7, 2016

Hundreds of volunteers are needed in Tampa on Friday to help package meals for people in Haiti.

Quincy Walters / WUSF News

As the death toll continues to rise in Haiti, people in Tampa's Haitian community are still on edge. 

Since last Thursday, the Haitian Association Foundation of Tampa Bay (HAFTB) has been collecting donations of canned food, flashlights, cleaning supplies and clothes at the Louverture Cultural Center on North Florida Avenue.

This afternoon Haiti once again postponed its presidential runoff election.

The vote – originally slated for last month – was going to be held on Sunday. But Haitian election officials said they canceled it because it was too hazardous. Street protests have gotten violent in recent days, with demonstrators condemning what they call a fraudulent and incompetent electoral process.

Carribean American Civic Movement photo

Europe and the U.S.-Mexico border aren't the only frontiers being crossed by migrants. Thousands of Haitians are being deported from the neighboring Dominican Republic, and one local group is trying to help some of those those left behind.

Five years ago today, a powerful earthquake struck Haiti, toppling historic landmarks, killing thousands of people, and displacing more than a million. Haitians mobilized to restore their communities, and the international community pledged billions of dollars in aid. 

But ex-pats have an important role to play in rebuilding. WMFE's Renata Sago spoke with an earthquake survivor in Central Florida who’s made it her mission to give back to the country.

Before Cardinal Chibly Langlois celebrated Mass at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church in Little Haiti, he took it all in.

A banner with his likeness hung from a black fence.

Parishioners wore yellow T-shirts with a picture of his face on the front and on the back, a message in Creole thanking God for blessing them with the first-ever Haitian cardinal.

Pediatrician Jennifer Halverson will never forget her 36th birthday.

The St. Paul native was volunteering at a maternity clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. She felt great — she went to her job that day and then out to dinner with friends.

But when she got home and went to sleep that night in May, something didn't feel right.

"Then I woke up at 3 in the morning," she says, "and what struck me the most was that my shoulders were on fire. It was like I was being stabbed in both shoulders."

Four years ago Sunday, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit Haiti, destroying its capital of Port-au-Prince and killing more than 200,000 people.

Today, much of Port-au-Prince looks like it did before the quake. Most of the tent camps in the city itself are gone, and streets are loaded with overcrowded buses and women selling vegetables.

Dozens of Haitians have died in a desperate attempt to reach the Bahamas, after their crowded 40-foot sloop capsized. Deployed from Florida, Coast Guard crews scrambled to work with Bahamian forces to rescue more than 100 survivors Tuesday. The Coast Guard says the craft ran aground in the Bahamas' Exuma Cays.

After The Haiti Earthquake, Fabienne Jean Dances Again

Jan 11, 2013
Nick Kozak

This week we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake in Haiti three years ago Saturday. A prosthetic technician from Boston helped Fabienne get a replacement leg.

He hoped to help her recover in other ways too: to start a business, buy a house and open up a dance studio. 

But none of these things came to pass. Late spring, Fabienne was struggling to find money to take care of her daughter and bedridden mother, who has since died.

In the final installment of our series, we learn where Fabienne is now. 

Nick Kozak

This week we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake in Haiti three years ago this month. 

A prosthetic technician from Boston heard Fabienne story and fitted her with a fake leg. He tried to help Fabienne recover in other ways, too.

Haiti Earthquake Three Years Later: A Tug of War

Jan 9, 2013
Nick Kozak

Yesterday we began the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake that devastated Haiti three years ago this month. A prosthetic technician from Boston promised to help Fabienne dance again. But he didn't stop there. He wanted to help her put the rest of her life back together, too. 

In the second part of our series, Jacob Kushner tells us how difficult their task would become. 

Pages