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Gulf of Mexico

ICON Aircraft

The tiny sport plane Roy Halladay was flying Tuesday when he fatally crashed into the Gulf of Mexico was made for entry-level pilots like him, though the plane's chief designer and test pilot died while flying one earlier this year, officials and experts said.

The first offshore sale in the US Oil and Gas Leasing program for the year has concluded. It offered the largest amount of acreage in the history of the federal offshore program in the Gulf of Mexico. Meanwhile the Trump Administration is working to expand offshore drilling into the eastern Gulf and other new areas. 

It has become a rite of summer. Every year, a "dead zone" appears in the Gulf of Mexico. It's an area where water doesn't have enough oxygen for fish to survive. And every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration commissions scientists to venture out into the Gulf to measure it.

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

A tropical storm warning has been issued for a section of Louisiana's coast as a weather system approaches from the Gulf of Mexico.

Forecasters Tracking Low Pressure System In Gulf

Jun 19, 2017
Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

A low-pressure system in the Gulf of Mexico could be the first storm to threaten Florida during the 2017 hurricane season.

U.S. Coast Guard

The U.S. Coast Guard says a second body has been recovered as crews continue to search the Gulf of Mexico for a family missing off the coast of southwest Florida.

A Coast Guard news release says Cape Coral Fire and Rescue found the body Thursday morning, about four miles from where the first body was found Wednesday. Authorities have not released the identity of either one.

Searchers have also found debris from the boat. On Thursday they found a sailboat mast.

Crews have been searching for 45-year-old Ace Kimberly and his three teenage children.

Ten watersheds around the rim of the Gulf of Mexico — from Florida to Texas — are being looked at as sites for $140 million in proposed conservation projects under a plan to restore the Gulf from BP's catastrophic 2010 oil spill.

On Thursday the Gulf Coast Restoration Council, a body set up by Congress to handle money derived from fines from the spill, released a list of the projects it wants to fund.

C-IMAGE Consortium

On April 20, 2010, a wellhead a mile below the surface of the Gulf of Mexico exploded, killing 11 workers aboard the Deepwater Horizon oil platform.

In the subsequent leak, more than 200 million gallons of oil spilled out. On the Gulf’s surface, the oil covered up to 68-thousand square miles – an area roughly equal to the size of Florida.

In 2010, just after the BP oil well in the Gulf of Mexico exploded, seafood restaurants were bombarded with questions from concerned diners: "How bad is the spill?" "Is this from the Gulf?" "Is it safe?" Demand for Gulf seafood tanked.

"You have to remember, that was literally weeks and months on end when you could turn on the TV at any time of day and see an oil well leaking unabatedly into the Gulf of Mexico," says Brett Anderson, feature food writer for Nola.com.

Photo Courtesy of REX

Five years after the BP oil spill, the environmental impacts are still being felt.

According to a report released Monday by the National Wildlife Federation, animals such as dolphins were found dead at four times the historic rates in 2014. The group believes the oil spill may be to blame.

"Bottle-nosed dolphins in the places most-affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill are very sick, their pregnancies are failing, and they're dying in large numbers," said Ryan Fikes, a restoration scientist with the National Wildlife Federation.

Researchers may have a better understanding of red tide blooms. These harmful algal blooms are becoming more persistent. That’s why the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission—along with a group of research partners—recently published a five year red tide study.

BP's 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico disrupted business all along the coastline. Through the end of July, the oil giant paid more than $13 billion to compensate people, businesses and communities affected. The company is disputing some of those claims in court battles that could drag on for years.

The U.S. is in the middle of an oil drilling boom that few people saw coming. After decades of decline, crude oil production is rising again. Technologies such as hydraulic fracturing in places such as North Dakota are getting a lot of attention. But the Gulf of Mexico still accounts for more than one-fifth of domestic oil production.

BP is fighting the settlement it agreed to last summer that let the oil company avoid thousands of potential lawsuits over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Just after the spill, when oil was still gushing into the Gulf, BP touted the $20 billion it set aside for claims. But now it says the claim process is corrupt and is hoping a court will overturn the settlement that established the claims fund.

Ending the claims would mean stopping a well-oiled machine.

Teams of workers are mobilizing in the Gulf of Mexico to try to stem a natural gas leak at an offshore drilling rig that exploded and caught fire Tuesday. The rig off the Louisiana coast has been partially destroyed by the out of control blaze, and firefighting boats are on the scene.

Public Hearing Today by Gulf of Mexico Alliance

Jun 24, 2013

The Gulf of Mexico Alliance -- a partnership among Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas working to enhance the economic and ecological health of the Gulf -- is holding a public hearing today in Tampa. 

The public hearing is starting at 4 p.m. at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Tampa. The group will discuss the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program (RESTORE Act Science Program).