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Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Jessica Meszaros / WUSF Public Media

State wildlife officials reported this past Friday that elevated levels of the organism Karenia brevis are persisting along Florida's gulf coast, which is creating toxic red tide algae blooms from Pinellas County down to Collier County.

State Funnels More Money To Addressing Water Woes

Sep 19, 2018

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is pumping another $4 million into efforts to help local communities suffering from red tide and a massive algae outbreak, raising spending to $13 million for the water problems.

The agency’s money will be used in Pinellas, Manatee, Collier, Sarasota, Lee and Martin counties.

Governor Rick Scott is directing an additional $3 million dollars to fight red tide in five of Florida’s most-affected counties. That brings grant funding to fight algae to a total of $9 million.

Florida has reopened 114 of the state parks that were closed for Hurricane Irma.

Conservation groups, Governor Rick Scott and Cabinet members are praising Florida’s newest top environmental regulator, Noah Valenstein, as a consensus builder dedicated to public service.

Environmental groups are giving Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Jon Steverson mixed reviews as he becomes one of the latest of Governor Rick Scott's top lieutenant's to step down.

Florida Department of Environmental Protection

An outgoing state utility regulator is landing a new job to head Florida's parks system after the old director was abruptly demoted.

Miami Will Appeal Controversial Water Standards Ruling

Sep 20, 2016

City of Miami officials said they would appeal a ruling after a judge tossed out challenges to controversial new state water-quality standards.

  Florida environmental regulators passed new rules Tuesday that will increase the levels of some toxic chemicals allowed in Florida's water.


The state wants to increase the amount of toxins it can put in Florida’s surface waters. State officials said they’re doing this based on federal guidelines. But some people worry it could harm residents.