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fake news

Snopes.com

We've all gotten an email or seen something online that seems a bit fishy.

Some people take the bait, but some check it out and often rely on a well-known online mythbuster called Snopes.com.

President Trump on Sunday intensified his assaults on media organizations that cover him and his administration, dismissing them as unpatriotic and irresponsible.

The attacks followed a tweet from the president in which he revealed that he had met the publisher of The New York Times, A.G. Sulzberger, and outlined some details of their conversation.

Trump tweeted that the two discussed "the vast amounts of Fake News being put out by the media & how that Fake News has morphed into phrase, "Enemy of the People." Sad!"

Russia's information attack against the United States during the 2016 election cycle sought to take advantage of the greater trust that Americans tend to place in local news.

The information operatives who worked out of the Internet Research Agency in St. Petersburg did not stop at posing as American social media users or spreading false information from purported news sources, according to new details.

They also created a number of Twitter accounts that posed as sources for Americans' hometown headlines.

Buzzfeed

Videos are an effective media known for its power to illicit emotion. And media consumers are learning the hard way that the images don’t have to be real to be convincing.

GOP.com

President Donald Trump finally announced his Fake News Awards this week, months after suggesting that he wanted to give a trophy to the journalist he felt was the most dishonest in coverage of his administration.

Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

By now, you've probably heard about one very real consequence of fake news — the infamous "pizzagate" conspiracy theory that ended with Edgar Welch, 28, firing a real gun inside a real Washington, D.C., pizzeria filled with real people.

It's not over yet, but 2016 has already been one of the "newsiest" years in recent memory. But a lot of the news turned out to be fake. WUSF's Steve Newborn talks with Katie Sanders of PolitiFact Florida to talk about their Lie of the Year.

This year has been a banner one for the news business. The presidential election, the surprise result, the ongoing wrangling over which way the country could be turning - and a lot this news, well, it wasn't true. So that takes us to the 2016 PolitiFact Lie of the Year.

It's... drum roll please... fake news.

Daylina Miller / WUSF

On Florida Matters, we explore how the 2016 presidential election was affected by social media, fake news and fact checking.

In this preview of  the show, WUSF's Carson Cooper talks to Peter Schorsch, the publisher of SaintPetersblog.com and Sunburn; Josh Gillin of Politifact Florida; and USF Communications Professor Kelli Burns.