Environment

WQCS

Officials are responding to fears in southwest Florida about a massive algae bloom fouling waters on the state's Atlantic coast.

The News-Press reports that the Lee County Visitor and Convention Bureau updated its website with water-monitoring information and live video of beaches overlooking the Gulf of Mexico.

The newspaper says tourism officials also frequently post videos from Fort Myers and Sanibel beaches on social media.

Wikimedia Commons

Florida wildlife officials are seeking plans from county and local governments to reduce conflicts between bears and humans.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

With growing concerns about pesticides and where our food comes from, more people are growing their own produce right in their own yard.

This "edible landscaping" has become the basis for some businesses.

Southwest Florida Water Management District

Florida wildlife officials have voted against holding a black bear hunt this year at their quarterly meeting.

Tampa Police

UPDATE AT NOON with information on capture of bear

After a short early morning stroll through a quiet residential neighborhood and a trip up a tree, a black bear has been captured near Tampa's Adventure Island.

Tampa Police called in trappers, who tranquilized the bear, caught it in a net and put it in a cage. The bear will be returned to its natural habitat. 

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection hosted a brownfields symposium this week in Sarasota.

Brownfields are sites considered to be “environmentally contaminated.”

The state wants to spread awareness about its brownfield redevelopment program to local cities and businesses.

Fertilizer Bans Take Effect Around Indian River Lagoon

Jun 2, 2016

Fertilizer bans start Wednesday in the five-county region of the Indian River Lagoon.

The bans also apply in nearly all of the region’s municipalities.

Frequent rains wash fertilizers into the lagoon, feeding the blooms that this spring triggered the worst fish kill in the lagoon in modern history.

Duane De Freese of the Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program says the bans are aimed at nitrogen and phosphorus, nutrients at the heart of the lagoon’s problems.

Joseph Gamble / Joseph Gamble Photography

Terry Tomalin, the outdoors editor for the Tampa Bay Times, died suddenly Thursday.

Tomalin was also a member of the faculty at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, where he taught digital journalism and led the Outdoor Leadership Program. He was also a graduate of USF.

FWC

Volusia County is urging the state not to hold another bear hunt. The county council wants the state to focus on other techniques to keep black bears out of suburban areas.

The Volusia Council says hunters killed too many bears during the state-regulated hunt last year and that the population of bears in central Florida is lower than it should be.

The state’s bear management plan sets a goal of at least 1,030 black bears in the region. The council says the hunt left central Florida more than 920 bears.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

More Florida panthers could die this year than last year’s record number.

Wildlife authorities attribute the mortalities to the endangered animal’s growing population.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials have documented 22 dead panthers so far this year. All but four of the animals died in vehicle collisions. Last year, 41 panthers died.

Darrell Land of FWC says the state’s panther population is estimated at up to 180 animals, compared with a few dozen 30 years ago.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

While Florida has about a quarter of the almost 400 reported cases of Zika in the United States, no one has been infected in Florida. But that's not stopping local public health experts from advising people to protect themselves.

Amy Green / WMFE

  The Indian River Lagoon stretches about 156 miles along the Florida's east coast. And it's where Laurilee Thompson has her earliest memories.

“I had a little tiny rowboat when I was 6-years-old . . . There were barnacles and oysters and sea squirts,” the Titusville resident recalled. “You know even just the pilings in  the sea walls were alive. . . the cone Jellies used to come in the spring . . . and you get this big green explosion. There were entire ecosystems just along the sea wall.”

Local scientists are studying the long-term effects of the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. It’s part of an international research project. It’s been six years since more than three-million barrels of oil poured into the gulf.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission has completed a years-long count of the state’s black bear population. Director of Habitat and Species Conservation, Thomas Eason says the population has grown by about 60-percent state-wide since the agency’s last estimates.

  Thawing diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba is allowing researchers with Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota to expand their coral research and possibly improve the health of Florida’s coral reef tract. 

Steve Newborn / WUSF News

Melanie White is on a mission to help save the elusive - and endangered - North Atlantic Right Whale.

"They have been here longer than we have, and there's no reason they shouldn't be able to survive and co-exist with humans," she says.

One of the most controversial bills in the 2016 legislative session was put on life support Thursday in Senate Appropriations.  Hanging in the balance could be the future of the oil and gas industry in Florida, and, critics insist, Florida’s environment.

Wikipedia.org

The number of manatees in Florida seems to be steady, according to a study released by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Honey, Who Shrank The Alligators?

Feb 20, 2016

In the Florida Everglades, the alligators are in trouble.

The reptiles are scrawny, weighing 80 percent of what they should. The alligators grow more slowly, reproduce less and die younger. Researchers are trying to figure out why this iconic species is in decline — and what it means for the Everglades.

When people talk about Florida's Everglades, they often use superlatives: It's the largest protected wilderness east of the Mississippi River, and it's the biggest subtropical wetland in North America.

But it is also the site of a joint federal-state plan that is the largest ecosystem restoration effort ever attempted — one that is beginning to pay off after decades of work.

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