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El Faro

A month after the U.S. Coast Guard released its final report on the sinking of cargo freighter El Faro, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson said he plans to file legislation.

But Nelson isn’t clear on exactly when or what kinds of measures he’d like to see implemented legislatively for a safer shipping industry.


Two years to the day after the American cargo ship the SS El Faro sank in a major hurricane off the Bahamas, killing all 33 people on board, U.S. Coast Guard investigators in Jacksonville made public their assessment of the disaster and called for widespread institutional reforms. 

The brother of one of El Faro’s able bodied seamen who died when the ship went down is speaking out after the release of a 200-page report from the U.S. Coast Guard’s Marine Board of Investigation.


Following the sinking of the El Faro cargo ship in October 2015, the National Transportation Safety Board has issued 10 new safety recommendations meant to better inform sailors of impending weather conditions.

The guidelines are being released after two hearings in Jacksonville into the ship’s sinking, which killed all 33 crew members aboard. El Faro set sail from Jacksonville toward Puerto Rico and sank near the Bahamas after losing power and drifting into the path of Hurricane Joaquin.

An engineer with the American Bureau of Shipping testified Thursday the sunken El Faro ship met all guidelines before it sailed in September of 2015.

That contradicts some previous testimony from one naval architect.

On Monday, four days after the ship vanished, the Coast Guard concluded the ship El Faro sank near the Bahamas in about 15,000 feet of water. One unidentified body in a survival suit was spotted, and the search went on for any trace of the other crew members. The search was continuing today.