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algae bloom

Scientists are seeing concerning levels of algae this year in Florida's Indian River Lagoon just two years after massive blooms led to the worst fish kills on record.

Satellite images this month show a harmful red tide algal bloom festering in the Gulf of Mexico-- mere miles away from the shorelines of Southwest Florida. But birds have been telling us this for over a month.

 

 


Legislation making its way on Capitol Hill could help Florida communities hit by toxic algae blooms.

Environmental groups are raising concerns about the Senate’s dramatically expanded plan to fight massive toxic algae blooms carpeting South Florida waterways.

Coffee-colored water gurgles near the W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam. It flows down the Caloosahatchee River, roughly 30 miles from Fort Myers.

WQCS

Officials are responding to fears in southwest Florida about a massive algae bloom fouling waters on the state's Atlantic coast.

The News-Press reports that the Lee County Visitor and Convention Bureau updated its website with water-monitoring information and live video of beaches overlooking the Gulf of Mexico.

The newspaper says tourism officials also frequently post videos from Fort Myers and Sanibel beaches on social media.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott says he'll push state legislators to spend millions to battle the massive algae bloom fouling some of the state's southern rivers and beaches.

Scott Declares Emergency Over Treasure Coast Algae Blooms

Jun 30, 2016

With widespread algae blooms causing beaches to be closed in Martin County, Gov. Rick Scott issued a state of emergency for Martin and St. Lucie counties on Wednesday.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection says an algal bloom in the St. Lucie River near the southern part of the Indian River Lagoon is not toxic.

Amy Green / WMFE

  The Indian River Lagoon stretches about 156 miles along the Florida's east coast. And it's where Laurilee Thompson has her earliest memories.

“I had a little tiny rowboat when I was 6-years-old . . . There were barnacles and oysters and sea squirts,” the Titusville resident recalled. “You know even just the pilings in  the sea walls were alive. . . the cone Jellies used to come in the spring . . . and you get this big green explosion. There were entire ecosystems just along the sea wall.”