Susan Giles Wantuck

Host Midday/Classical Host

Susan Giles Wantuck is a news host, producer and reporter for WUSF Public Media who focuses her storytelling on arts and culture.  She also serves as a music host on Classical WSMR 89.1 and 103.9. 

She is a lifelong resident with family roots that stretch back in Florida before it garnered statehood.  Susan holds a B.A. in Mass Communication from USF.  Her work has been honored by the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Ways To Connect

Joseph Gamble

Longtime Floridian Joseph Gamble has a new exhibition at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa. It's his largest exhibition ever, which encompasses a sort of retrospective of his entire body of work, and photographs he's taken at Cape Canaveral. Gamble, who has taught photography at The University of Tampa, now teaches at Colorado Mountain College. 

Politifact Florida

    

Both of the statements made this week by two Republican presidential candidates in Florida came up half true on the Politifact Florida Truth-O-Meter. 

First up for consideration, Jeb Bush in officially announcing that he is running for president, brought up a statement made by political rival Democrat Hillary Clinton. 

In Bush's words, "Secretary Clinton insists that when the progressive agenda encounters religious beliefs to the contrary those beliefs, quote, 'have to be changed.' That’s what she said and I guess we should at least thank her for the warning."

Clinton delivered the keynote address at this year's Women in the World Summit. She said, "Yes, we’ve cut the maternal mortality rate in half but far too many women are still denied critical access to reproductive health care and safe childbirth. All the laws we’ve passed don’t count for much if they’re not enforced.  Rights have to exist in practice, not just on paper.  Laws have to be backed up with resources and political will. And deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs, and structural biases have to be changed."

Josh Gillen of Politifact Florida  said they determined Bush's statement to be half-true because he took Clinton's words out of  context. Gillen said, "She's talking about these ideas,  in order for women across the planet really, to have access to proper healthcare and maternal medicine, and the right to not be abused by their partners, these are the things that are gonna have to change. He (Bush) is making it sound like she is attacking religious beliefs in general." 

Wikipedia

Largo Police said an 81-year-old man was out for a walk, got caught in a storm and he was struck by lightning Friday. The man, Jay Freres, did not survive.

Summertime in Florida is typically wet with gully washers virtually every day. Bay News 9 Chief Meteorologist Mike Clay said daily storms are why the state is known as the "lightning capital of the world" and not because the lightning here is more intense. 

Wikipedia

The Twitterverse is blowing up with claims that Florida has a "flesh-eating" bacteria but state health officials are trying to tamp down what they say is wrong information.

    

Author Chris Farrell wants to change the conversation about aging and how we spend the last third or even half of our lives. He's a senior economics contributor at Marketplace, among other things. 

The final concert for the Gulf Coast Youth Choirs and the Tampa Bay Children's Chorus is this weekend. They perform at the Straz Center in Tampa this Sunday (May 17) at 4.

Jim Webb

The Tampa Theatre recently hosted "Enchanted Earth: An Evening with Syliva Earle and Meg Lowman." The conversation with two of America’s most beloved explorers and conservationists was moderated by  was moderated by WUSF's Susan Giles Wantuck.

Courtesy The New York Times

Sharon Preston-Folta grew up knowing that jazz great Louis Armstrong was her father.

When she was little, she and her mom rode the tour bus with him. And since she didn't see him often, it was "a celebration" when her dad was around.

Remember the story of Davion Only? He's the teenager who gained worldwide notice after pleading with the congregation of a church in St. Petersburg to adopt him.Ten-thousand people came forward to inquire about him.But in the end, the answer to his prayer was already close at hand.

Marius Jovaisa

Lithuanian photographer and entrepreneur Marius Jovaisa loves a challenge.  He participates in triathlons and marathons. So when it came to work projects, he decided he wanted to become the first person on earth to take aerial photographs of Cuba.

After five years of negotiating red tape to gain the permissions needed to fly over the places he wanted to photograph and spending $1,000,000 U.S. on this project, he said he wakes up sometimes and can't believe it's done. 

Courtesy of lookatusnowmother.com

    

From as far back as she can remember, Emmy award-winning filmmaker Gayle Kirschenbaum's relationship with her mother was, "not good."

She grew up the only daughter of a glamorous mother. Kirschenbaum lived in fear of her mother's punishment, and had perpetual headaches and dizzy spells. Her film, "Look at Us Now, Mother," cobbles together old pictures and movies to tell the story of their relationship, which Kirschenbaum said was filled with shame and humiliation early on. 

Marc Holm

Violinist Joshua Bell is going to be playing one of his favorite violin sonatas Tuesday March 24th in Clearwater with pianist Sam Haywood at the Capitol Theatre .   

The first Sonata in G, Opus 78, by Johannes Brahms really has a place in his heart. "It's the most lyrical piece I know. It doesn't have an ending that brings the house down, but every time I play it or hear it, I almost have tears just about to come out of my eyes, because it's just so beautiful and there's nothing like it," Bell said.

But don't go looking for him to cry at his own concert. He said he's more apt to become emotional when listening, rather than playing the music.

Bell's three sons are also playing music now. His five-year-old twins and seven-year-old play the cello, piano and violin. Bell said there is some talent there, and "it's fun to see." But he believes every child should study music, regardless of whether they make a career of it. "It should be in the schools," he said, not as an after-school elective.

Former U.S. Ambassador Chris Hill is talking tonight (March 17) at 6 p.m. at the Mildred Sainier Pavilion at New College in Sarasota. He has a new book out, "Outpost:Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy: A Memoir."

Hill served in South Korea, the Balkans and Iraq. And now serves as Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.

Best-selling author Kim John Payne is hoping the community will embrace his ideas about parenting.  

It's looking more and more like Florida's Junior U.S. Senator is planning to run for president next year. Recently he traveled to West Des Moines, Iowa and spoke on radio station WHO.  As part of that discussion, Sen. Marco Rubio said that ISIS is now the "predominant Islamist group in Benghazi." 

The PolitiFact Florida team investigated this statement and determined that what he said was "mostly false" on the Truth-o-Meter.  According to Josh Gillin of Politifact Florida, "no one is in charge of Libya's second-largest city."

Pages