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Stephanie Colombini

Reporter

Stephanie Colombini joined WUSF Public Media in December 2016 as Producer of Florida Matters, WUSF’s public affairs show. She’s also a reporter for WUSF’s Health News Florida project.

Stephanie was born and raised just outside New York City. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx, where she got her start in radio at NPR member station WFUV in 2012. In addition to reporting and anchoring, Stephanie helped launch the news department’s first podcast series, Issues Tank.

Prior to joining the WUSF family, Stephanie spent a year reporting for CBS Radio’s flagship station WCBS Newsradio 880 in Manhattan. Her assignments included breaking news stories such as the 2016 bombings in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood and Seaside Park, NJ and political campaigns. As part of her job there, she was forced to – and survived – a night of reporting on New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

Her work in feature reporting and podcast production has earned her awards from the Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and the Alliance for Women in Media.

While off-the-clock, you might catch Stephanie at a rock concert, on a fishing boat or anywhere that serves delicious food.

Contact Stephanie by emailing her at scolombini@wusf.org or follow her on Twitter @steph_colombini.

Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we'll hear the first episode in a special two-part series called Telling Tampa Bay Stories: Progress Village.

We'll hear residents of Tampa's first affordable housing suburb share their memories growing up there. And they'll talk about their hopes for the neighborhood's future.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

There's plenty of opportunities to see popular live music acts in the Tampa Bay area, but some major artists rarely pay us a visit. One local tribute band is putting their own unique flair on songs you may never get to hear live.


Sometimes when something is as universal, necessary and mundane as eating, it's hard to make "food" sound special. But not for the people on this Florida Matters.

WUSF has been talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways. Food...as muse.


Krayl Funch

Sometimes when something is as universal, necessary and mundane as eating, it's hard to make "food" sound special. But not for the people on this Florida Matters.

WUSF has been talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways. Food...as muse.

Our guests include:

Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our show about people who communicate their passion for food in particularly interesting ways.

In this preview, Florida Matters reporter Bobbie O'Brien visits the kitchen of Tampa Bay Times cookbook reviewer Ileana Morales Valentine as she tests a new recipe.


WUSF Public Media

Throughout this past year, members of WUSF 89.7 and Classical WSMR have been highlighting live music that makes the Tampa Bay Area a little more special as part of our ongoing Art Populi series.

This week on Florida Matters we hear some of those stories.


Yuisa Rios / FEMA

More than two months after Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, thousands are still fleeing the island and many are coming to Florida.

This week on Florida Matters we'll discuss the impact of the Puerto Rican migration to Florida during the latest edition of our monthly news roundtable.


Steven Shepard / FEMA

This week on Florida Matters we're hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable. We'll discuss how the Puerto Rican migration to Florida after Hurricane Maria could impact our state.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

This is the Sunshine State, so doesn’t solar power make sense? Then why does it only make up a tiny fraction of Florida’s electricity output? This week on Florida Matters we’re talking about the promise and prognosis of solar energy in the state.


Books, music, authors, food -- it's time for the 25th annual Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading. This week on Florida Matters we're talking with three of the authors that will be featured in the event, held Saturday November 11 at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.


This week on Florida matters we'll talk with three authors who will be featured during the upcoming Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading on November 11.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida’s power companies have invested billions and billions of dollars to harden the electrical grid since the hurricanes of 2004 and 2005. Could you tell?

If you lost power after Hurricane Irma – and 6.5 million homes did – it may have been hard to discern how things have improved in the last dozen years.


www.blendspace.com

Electricity is such a mundane part of life we may not think about it that often -- until you lose power during a hurricane and are left sitting for days in the Florida heat! We're talking about electrical power this week on Florida Matters.


Richard Spencer shakes things up in Gainesville, Florida’s traditional public schools push back against a charter school law and Obamacare insurance subsidies may live to see another day. This week on Florida Matters we’re hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable.


V@s (Wikimedia Commons)

This week on Florida Matters we're hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable. One topic that was all over the news this past week was white nationalist Richard Spencer's visit to the University of Florida.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Bipartisanship in Washington -- or lack thereof -- and what Florida voters can do about it. That's what two former Congressman are talking about in a series of town halls around the state.


Former Congressmen David Jolly, a Republican, and Patrick Murphy, a Democrat, are currently on a speaking tour to address the lack of bi-partisanship in Washington D.C. 

USF St. Petersburg/Stephanie Colombini

One of the area's leading African American family-owned newspapers, The Weekly Challenger in St. Petersburg, just celebrated its 50th anniversary. Tampa's preeminent Hispanic newspaper, La Gaceta, is approaching 100 years. This week on Florida Matters we're talking about the history and cultural impact of ethnic publications in the Tampa Bay area.


Stephanie Colombini/USF St. Petersburg

One of the area's leading newspapers, The Weekly Challenger in St. Petersburg, just celebrated its 50th anniversary. This week on Florida Matters we're talking about the history and cultural impact of Tampa Bay's ethnic publications.

Anxiety is high among leaders at community health centers after Congress failed to meet a deadline to reauthorize their funding over the weekend.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our discussion about foster care in the region.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Manatee and Sarasota Counties have seen overdose deaths from drugs like heroin, fentanyl and carfentanil spike in the past few years. At the same time, the number of children being removed from their homes and placed into the area’s foster care system has skyrocketed. There’s a connection between the increases.

We're starting something new on Florida Matters. Once a month we're going to gather together some experienced reporters from around the state for perspective on the important news happening in Florida.

This week we're talking about the consequences of Hurricane Irma, and lessons learned from the storm.

JULIO OCHOA / WUSF PUBLIC MEDIA

The 2017 World Rowing Championships kick off at Nathan Benderson Park in Sarasota Saturday.


Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

Hurricane Irma was the strongest storm to hit Florida in 12 years, and it impacted nearly the entire state -- from wind damage and storm surge, to evacuations, gas shortages and of course the loss of power for millions.


Ebyabe (Wikimedia Commons)

Like most of the Tampa Bay Area, Sarasota County is focused on restoring power to the thousands of residents who lost it during Hurricane Irma. But something else has emergency officials' attention -- flooding of the Myakka River.

disasterassistance.gov

Hurricane Irma victims in the Tampa Bay area may be able to get some extra help from the federal government.

Sarasota County Government Facebook

All of Sarasota's emergency shelters have been closed down after Hurricane Irma except one.

The county's Chief of Emergency Management Ed McCrane says as of Monday afternoon, there were about 30 residents with special needs still staying in one shelter.

WUSF Public Media

We’ve been asking you to share your experience with Hurricane Irma, and many Tampa Bay area residents answered our call.

This week on Florida Matters we hear from listeners who told us what it was like for them to make it through the storm, and how they’ve been holding up since Irma left the state.


WUSF Public Media

WUSF and WSMR provided you with continuing coverage on Hurricane Irma. Now we want to invite you to join the conversation.

We're hosting a special live call-in program Tuesday September 12 at 9 AM on WUSF 89.7. 

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