Stephanie Colombini

Reporter

Stephanie Colombini joined WUSF Public Media in December 2016 as Producer of Florida Matters, WUSF’s public affairs show. She’s also a reporter for WUSF’s Health News Florida project.

Stephanie was born and raised just outside New York City. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx, where she got her start in radio at NPR member station WFUV in 2012. In addition to reporting and anchoring, Stephanie helped launch the news department’s first podcast series, Issues Tank.

Prior to joining the WUSF family, Stephanie spent a year reporting for CBS Radio’s flagship station WCBS Newsradio 880 in Manhattan. Her assignments included breaking news stories such as the 2016 bombings in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood and Seaside Park, NJ and political campaigns. As part of her job there, she was forced to – and survived – a night of reporting on New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

Her work in feature reporting and podcast production has earned her awards from the Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and the Alliance for Women in Media.

While off-the-clock, you might catch Stephanie at a rock concert, on a fishing boat or anywhere that serves delicious food.

Express Tampa Bay

Is it time for the Tampa Bay area to create express toll lanes to speed up urban traffic? Or is it a waste of taxpayer money and an affront to historic neighborhoods?

This week on Florida Matters we're talking about the transportation plan known as Tampa Bay Express, or TBX.

Wikimedia Commons

Is it time for the Tampa Bay area to create express toll lanes to speed up urban traffic? Or is it a waste of taxpayer money and an affront to historic neighborhoods?

This week on Florida Matters we're talking about the transportation plan known as Tampa Bay Express, or TBX.

John Pastor/Flickr

The latest study by non-profit organization Smart Growth America ranks Florida as the most dangerous state to walk in the country.

Scott Young

The disease called citrus greening has wreaked havoc on our state's most iconic industry. Florida is harvesting the smallest citrus crop in 52 years. 

State and federal dollars have been pouring into frantic efforts to save groves. Some of the efforts seem to be paying off. But is it too late for the small family farms?

AP

The disease called citrus greening has wreaked havoc on our state's most iconic industry. Florida is harvesting the smallest citrus crop in 52 years. 

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Thousands of college football fans gathered in Tampa and surrounding cities for a weekend packed with events meant to pump them up for the College Football National Championship game.

Julio Ochoa/WUSF

A new medical marijuana dispensary could be up and running in Tampa as soon as next week.

Gulf Coast Community Foundation

Sarasota residents who want to try out solar energy are getting a chance to save money on rooftop panels. A new solar co-op launched in the county Wednesday morning.

Michael McArthur

The statistics are familiar; most startups don't make it. But job growth and innovation are the life blood of a thriving community. On Florida Matters, we discuss how to grow -- and keep -- successful entrepreneurs in Tampa Bay.

 

The Merriam-Webster definition of an entrepreneur is "a person who starts a business and is willing to risk loss in order to make money." They also must be willing to work hard and crazy hours, and give up the security of working for someone else. But the rewards can be substantial.

Tonight’s show includes the following guests:

 

Stephanie Colombini

Fans getting ready for next week's College Football National Championship can brace themselves for heightened security around Tampa.

Todd Bates

This week on Florida Matters (Tuesday, Jan. 3 at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 8 at 7:30 a.m.), we are taking another listen to our discussion about how to grow -- and keep -- successful entrepreneurs here in the Tampa Bay area.

The show includes a conversation WUSF’s Lisa Peakes had with Tonya Donati, the creator of the Mother Kombucha Warehouse in St. Petersburg. 

Steve Linder, flickr

Fishing enthusiasts should note Florida is making some changes to mutton snapper regulations that kick in January 1.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says the species is not overfished, but says data indicates the population may be lower than previously estimated.

The recreational limit for mutton snapper is essentially being cut in half. Currently there is a 10-snapper per person bag limit, and that's most kinds of snapper. But beginning in January, only five of those snappers can be mutton snapper.

Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

Law enforcement is leaving no stone unturned when it comes to security at the 2017 College Football National Championship, according to Marc Hamlin, Assistant Chief with the Tampa Police Department.

As 2016 winds down, we’re taking another listen to some of the best news stories we discussed on Florida Matters throughout the year.

As 2016 winds down, Florida Matters is taking a look back at some of the best news stories we discussed throughout the year.

Melies the Bunny, flickr

The debate over how to regulate ridesharing companies like Uber and Lyft is returning to the Florida legislature. 


Krayl Funch

Sometimes when something is as universal, necessary and mundane as eating, it's hard to make "food" sound special. But not for the people on this Florida Matters.

WUSF has been talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways. Food...as muse.

Our guests include:

Ileana Morales Valentine

Cookbooks can be both inspirational and useful, making them exceptionally good gifts, according to Tampa Bay Times cookbook reviewer Ileana Morales Valentine.

Elisa Albo

On Florida Matters "Food as Muse," we're talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways.

In this preview of the show, WUSF's Robin Sussingham talks to Elisa Albo, a poet and English professor at Broward College in Ft. Lauderdale. 

Courtesy of Lenny Pozner

Lenny Pozner and his family moved from Connecticut to Florida after his 6 year-old son Noah was killed in the Sandy Hook School shooting.  Pozner had hoped for some peace, but that's far from what he got.

Since his son died, Pozner says he's been constantly harassed by people who believe the shooting never happened. “Hoaxers,” he calls them.

Pages