Stephanie Colombini

Reporter

Stephanie Colombini joined WUSF Public Media in December 2016 as Producer of Florida Matters, WUSF’s public affairs show. She’s also a reporter for WUSF’s Health News Florida project.

Stephanie was born and raised just outside New York City. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx, where she got her start in radio at NPR member station WFUV in 2012. In addition to reporting and anchoring, Stephanie helped launch the news department’s first podcast series, Issues Tank.

Prior to joining the WUSF family, Stephanie spent a year reporting for CBS Radio’s flagship station WCBS Newsradio 880 in Manhattan. Her assignments included breaking news stories such as the 2016 bombings in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood and Seaside Park, NJ and political campaigns. As part of her job there, she was forced to – and survived – a night of reporting on New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

Her work in feature reporting and podcast production has earned her awards from the Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and the Alliance for Women in Media.

While off-the-clock, you might catch Stephanie at a rock concert, on a fishing boat or anywhere that serves delicious food.

Contact Stephanie by emailing her at scolombini@wusf.org or follow her on Twitter @steph_colombini.

Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

Hurricane Irma was the strongest storm to hit Florida in 12 years, and it impacted nearly the entire state -- from wind damage and storm surge, to evacuations, gas shortages and of course the loss of power for millions.


Ebyabe (Wikimedia Commons)

Like most of the Tampa Bay Area, Sarasota County is focused on restoring power to the thousands of residents who lost it during Hurricane Irma. But something else has emergency officials' attention -- flooding of the Myakka River.

disasterassistance.gov

Hurricane Irma victims in the Tampa Bay area may be able to get some extra help from the federal government.

Sarasota County Government Facebook

All of Sarasota's emergency shelters have been closed down after Hurricane Irma except one.

The county's Chief of Emergency Management Ed McCrane says as of Monday afternoon, there were about 30 residents with special needs still staying in one shelter.

WUSF Public Media

We’ve been asking you to share your experience with Hurricane Irma, and many Tampa Bay area residents answered our call.

This week on Florida Matters we hear from listeners who told us what it was like for them to make it through the storm, and how they’ve been holding up since Irma left the state.


WUSF Public Media

WUSF and WSMR provided you with continuing coverage on Hurricane Irma. Now we want to invite you to join the conversation.

We're hosting a special live call-in program Tuesday September 12 at 9 AM on WUSF 89.7. 

Flickr

Communities across Florida are preparing for the potential impact of Hurricane Irma, and one natural line of defense we have is the state’s beaches.

But not all beaches are equally suited to protect us, thanks to past storm damage, coastal development and Florida’s ever-changing landscape.


Marc Haze / WUSF News

Hurricane season is well underway. And storms that hit the coast can wreak havoc on our state's beaches. This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our discussion on beach erosion and how to repair it.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Tampa Congresswoman Kathy Castor are asking the federal government to step in after thousands of kids were kicked off a state Medicaid program. The two Democrats sent a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price earlier this week.


WRCH 2017

For the first time in over 20 years, the World Rowing Championships will return to the U.S. next month in Sarasota-Bradenton.

This week on Florida Matters we’re talking about the sport of rowing and what it means to host the championships in the Tampa Bay Area.


In a rare move, former President Barack Obama made an endorsement in the St. Petersburg mayoral race. He threw his support behind current Mayor Rick Kriseman ahead of the August 29 primary election.


Two more school districts have joined a lawsuit that challenges parts of a controversial state education law.


USF LIBRARIES DIGITAL HERITAGE AND HUMANITIES COLLECTIONS

Imagine leaving for work in the morning and finding out a few hours later that your home and every possession within it has been swallowed by the earth. Sinkholes in Florida make that a real possibility.


South Florida Information Access / U.S. Geological Survey

Sinkholes are making headlines again in Florida, and that has many homeowners concerned about how such a disaster could impact their neighborhoods.


Latvala Rolls Out Campaign For Governor

Aug 17, 2017
Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

State Senator Jack Latvala kicked off his campaign for governor Wednesday with a multi-city tour around the state. He received a warm welcome from his home base in Pinellas County when he gave a speech at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium.


Summer is in full swing and for those who can't get out of town, a staycation can make all the difference. This week on Florida Matters we're taking a look at some ways to escape the everyday hustle and bustle and have some fun in the Tampa Bay Area. 


Robin Sussingham

This week on Florida Matters we're exploring some of the many staycations the Tampa Bay area has to offer. One way to beat the summer heat is to spend an afternoon in the cool confines of a café treating your sweet tooth.

Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham took that to the next level. 


Joselyn DeFreest / Empower Adventures Tampa Bay

This week on Florida Matters we’re exploring some ways to beat the summer doldrums and enjoy a “staycation” in the Tampa Bay Area.

USF Libraries Digital Heritage and Humanities Collections

Sinkholes are making headlines again in Florida. And that has many homeowners concerned about how such a disaster could impact their neighborhoods.

Mary Shedden / WUSF Public Media

Tourism brought in an estimated $109 billion a year to Florida at last count. This week on Florida Matters we’re taking a look at the current state of Florida’s number one industry.


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