Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

A state lawmaker wants Florida students to be taught about boating safety in schools.

The construction of the Florida Holocaust Memorial is one step closer to becoming reality. That's among 20 bills Governor Rick Scott signed into law Wednesday.

A new Florida law allows the state to pay for the reburial of boys’ remains found on the grounds of the now-defunct Dozier School for Boys as well as helps take care of the unclaimed remains.  Some stakeholders are now looking toward next steps associated with the new law.

Florida has a new police body cameras law on the books. Governor Rick Scott signed the bill into statute Thursday.

A bill aimed at helping to address the state’s rape kits backlog is now heading to the Governor, after passing the Florida Legislature unanimously.

The Florida Senate has passed a bill allowing the state to provide financial help to the families who want to rebury the remains of their loved ones, found on the Panhandle property of the former Dozier School for Boys. Its House counterpart is also heading to the floor.

Governor Rick Scott signed a number of bills into law Wednesday. Among them are a pair of gun-related bills that have the backing of law enforcement and gun rights groups.

A body cameras-related bill is now headed to the Senate floor.

The Florida House passed a controversial bill making changes to Florida’s Retirement System.

Bills creating statewide standards to help in the processing of Florida’s thousands of untested rape kits as well as future kits are now heading to the floors of the House and Senate, after passing their last committees Thursday.

The Florida Senate passed a series of gun bills Thursday.

A measure to help Florida get rid of its backlog of thousands of untested rape kits passed its first Senate panel Monday.

A bill making changes to Florida’s 10-20-Life law is now heading to the House floor.

A convicted serial killer is scheduled to die by lethal injection Thursday afternoon.

A Florida lawmaker wants to put some regulations in place for laser hair removal technicians.

The head of Florida’s child welfare system gained unanimous approval during his initial Senate confirmation hearing Thursday.

A bill requiring law enforcement agencies that use body cameras to have guidelines and procedures in place passed its first House committee Wednesday.

A bill aimed at eliminating the unintended consequences of Florida’s 10-20-Life law in self-defense claims unanimously passed its first House panel Wednesday.

Governor Rick Scott says he wants an additional about $23 million to fund Florida’s child welfare agency—under scrutiny recently for its involvement in two high profile child abuse deaths.

The head of Florida’s child welfare agency says despite several reforms, his agency failed in preventing the latest high profile child deaths.

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