Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that includes a bipartisan effort from Florida’s Senators to improve hurricane forecasts.

Florida prison officials say they’re looking to enhance the mental health treatment of inmates—particularly in the Panhandle. But, they need to hire more than 100 employees to meet that goal. Kim Banks is the Chief Financial Officer for the Florida Department of Corrections.

Like the newly elected President and the future Congress, Florida’s future leaders will look pretty much the same. Still, while the Republican-led state legislature still continues to hold a majority, there were some upsets.

Unsafe sleep is the number one cause of child deaths in Florida. That’s prompted an ongoing state campaign to prevent such deaths. And, one organization has more tips for parents and caregivers about their child’s sleeping conditions.

With increasingly dry conditions, the Florida Forest Service wants the public to aware of wildfire danger.

Florida Department of Corrections’ probation officers will be working with law enforcement across the state Monday to ensure sex offenders are not interacting with kids this Halloween.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is partnering with other health officials to remind parents to avoid “candy confusion” by keep their medications and their children’s Halloween candy separate.

A measure signed into law by President Obama includes money to help combat the Zika virus. Florida is expected to be one of the areas to get a large amount of the funds. That’s in addition to the millions of dollars in state money Governor Rick Scott has already set aside in the Zika fight. But, questions now remain about when and how the funds will be distributed to help affected Floridians.

The U.S. Senate has again blocked a bill that would have provided funds to help combat the Zika virus.

Starting next month, thousands of Florida’s correctional and probation officers will decide which union they want representing them. The choice is between the Florida Police Benevolent Association and the Teamsters Union.

It’s good news to Florida’s Congressional Delegation and Governor Rick Scott that Congress could be close to striking a deal on funding efforts to combat the Zika virus. Florida just passed the 800 mark for the amount of cases reported to health officials. But, Florida leaders are a bit split on how that funding should be accomplished.

Congress is facing a September 30th deadline to make sure a budget deal is reached to fund the federal government. Lawmakers just came back from a seven-week break, and both the U.S. House and Senate have yet to reach an agreement on a bill to fund anti-Zika efforts—widely seen as a non-partisan issue. Governor Rick Scott is going Tuesday for a two-day trip to Washington D.C. to talk to members of Congress of the importance of that funding for Florida.

After about two months in recess, Congress is back in Washington D.C., and people are hopeful there will be some agreement on what can be done to combat the Zika virus—which has already plagued more than 750 Floridians. That comes as the Senate failed to pass another Zika funding bill again this week and there may be even more issues surrounding the mosquito-borne disease on the table.

During the time of a disaster, the state usually sees a spike in charitable giving. But, Florida officials are asking people to be mindful of charity-related scams, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hermine. 

Florida wildlife officials are asking the public for their help in deciding rules for venomous reptiles.

One of the many focuses of this year’s upcoming Human Trafficking Summit may be on Florida’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT community.

Florida wildlife officials are continuing to monitor the aftermath of Tropical Storm Colin and its impact on sea turtle nests across the state. The storm destroyed several hundred nests, but officials say Floridians can help.

This week is National Safe Boating Week. It kicked off right around the start of Florida’s boating season.

Laurel wilt has destroyed thousands of avocado trees in most counties across the state. While the deadly disease has not yet made it to several Panhandle counties, experts say it’s only a matter of time.

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among Florida’s youth, and a newly signed law aims to promote youth suicide prevention training in schools.

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