Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

A number of NRA-backed bills are now headed to the House floor. That includes a bill making changes to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and another allowing guns on private school property.

A pair of bills to increase school bus safety passed their first House committee Tuesday. 

During Tuesday’s Developmental Disabilities Awareness Day, Florida’s House Majority Leader made a personal case as to why he believes the state’s business recruitment agency should be eliminated.

No correctional officers are responsible for the scalding hot shower death of mentally ill inmate Darren Rainey. That’s according to Miami Dade’s State Attorney, who released a report concluding just that. But, some people aren’t buying it.

A bill requiring autism awareness training for law enforcement officers is now heading to the House floor.

A Stand Your Ground-related bill passed the Florida Senate Wednesday, but not without some opposition.

Did you know it’s worse to vandalize a public telephone than deface a Veterans’ monument in Florida? As one of the most populous states for veterans, Florida lawmakers are trying to correct that.

A body cameras bill is starting to move through the House and Senate. But,  some lawmakers want another measure to move forward that mandates officers use the cameras at all traffic stops, citing a high profile South Florida death.

A Stand Your Ground-related bill is now teed up for a vote in the full Florida Senate. But, a bipartisan push to water down the bill Thursday is angering some gun rights groups.

A couple of juvenile justice-related bills are now moving in the Florida House and Senate.

What’s ahead legislatively for Florida prison and juvenile justice systems?

The first black President of the United States is a good role model and a good father. That’s according to the head of Florida’s child welfare agency, who spoke during a recent Black History Month celebration.

Florida lawmakers may be looking at getting rid of the state’s so-called “Clean Hands” provision. That provision stops those with a prior felony record from automatically receiving compensation, even if they were wrongfully imprisoned for a new crime.

Governor Rick Scott is now the Vice Chairman of the Republican Governors Association.

Florida lawmakers want to allow law enforcement officers to review their body camera footage before writing a report or making a statement.

The head of the Florida Department of Corrections says her agency is doing its part to help make sure released inmates aren’t targeted by potential human traffickers.

There are more than 120 specialty license plates in Florida, and some Florida lawmakers are hoping to add several more to that list. It includes a “President Ronald Reagan” license plate that will also go toward helping fight the disease he had in the latter years of his life.

A new hunting dog rule approved by Florida wildlife officials is drawing some concerns.

A bill requiring autism awareness training for law enforcement officers is starting to move in both chambers of the Florida Legislature. It comes after a high profile incident that occurred in South Florida last year involving a black man, an autistic man, and law enforcement.

A bill making changes to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law is now headed to the Senate floor, after passing its last committee Thursday. One of its ardent supporters is Marissa Alexander—the Jacksonville woman who faced 60 years in prison for firing a warning shot in an alleged domestic dispute.

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