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Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

A Florida lawmaker is trying to revive a gun bill that has already failed to pass twice during the 2018 legislative session.

Two Democratic Lawmakers are hoping Florida gets involved in a movement that would change the way Floridians vote for the President.

Florida lawmakers are already moving forward a bill to reform the state’s juvenile justice system. The measure aims to address abuses within the system outlined in a Miami Herald investigative series.

Should inmates be criminally charged when cell phones are found on their person? In Florida prisons, that can occur. But, in county jails, not so much. During a recent legislative debate, lawmakers discussed a bill making it illegal for local jail inmates to have cell phones within the facilities.

Unless Florida lawmakers act, an organization created to aid in the efforts of Florida’s Guardian ad Litem program is set to expire later this year.

“Project Leo” could launch statewide, under a bill that has passed its first House committee. It would make it easier for law enforcement to track missing people with special needs.

Ever been the victim of a data breach? Maybe you were part of last year’s breach involving one of the largest credit agencies, Equifax. But, in Florida, if you wanted to place a freeze on your credit report, Equifax could still charge you a fee. Now, a bill is starting to move in the Florida House to eliminate that cost to consumers.

A bill making texting while driving a primary offense passed its first committee Tuesday. It also drew some concerns.

As part of Human Trafficking Awareness Month, law enforcement officials and other stakeholders are coming together to make sure Floridians know what to look for to help combat the modern day slavery practice.

Floridians have until Sunday to file a claim against three rental car companies for wrongfully charging them for its e-Toll services.

The Florida Senate has received a report that concludes there is probable cause for some of the sexual harassment allegations against state Senator Jack Latvala (R-Clearwater). The Special Master’s report also opens the door to other investigations, including a possible criminal one.

As law enforcement agencies across Florida consider using body cameras, the state’s wildlife officers are following suit.

The costs to settle outstanding prison lawsuits could mean less money to spend on Florida Department of Corrections’ priorities. That’s the message from the new Florida Senate Budget chair.

The repeal of “net neutrality” rules that allowed consumers to have equal access to the internet has upset Florida’s U.S. Democratic Senator.

A bill funding a unique facility to help solve cold cases is starting to move forward in the Florida House.

The official start to the 2018 legislative session is about a month away, and already, some high profile gun bills appear to be dead. Discussion surrounding the proposals not only pit Republicans against one another, it’s led to sparring between gun rights groups as well.

A bipartisan group of Florida lawmakers is looking to create an alternative to restore the rights of former inmates.

A number of gun bills appear to be dead for the 2018 legislative session, after failing to pass their first Florida Senate committee Tuesday.

A proposal changing the eligibility requirements for becoming a judge in a state or county court is starting to move in a committee of the Constitution Revision Commission. That’s the panel that meets every 20 years to revise the state constitution and put the matter before voters.

Thursday marked the end of Hurricane Season, and Governor Rick Scott is noting lessons to apply next year.

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