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Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

An organization that deals a lot with human trafficked kids says it’s important to go into the schools and educate potential victims early about traffickers.

State Representative Ross Spano is the latest Republican to enter the 2018 race for Florida Attorney General.

Florida’s prison population appears to be on the decline.

For the most part, Governor Rick Scott’s $87.4 billion budget proposal appears very promising. That’s according to the Florida Senate’s new budget chairman,  Sen. Rob Bradley (R-Fleming Island).

In response to a spate of child abuse deaths in Florida, state lawmakers in 2014 created teams to investigate the root causes of these deaths and report them to Florida’s child welfare agency. Now, a similar effort is underway for the state’s elderly population.

Florida lawmakers are trying to establish a pilot program to help newborns exposed to addictive drugs while in their mother’s womb.

Bills aimed at making it easier for human trafficking victims to sue their traffickers have passed a House committee.

A revived bill that wades into the abortion debate has passed its first Florida Senate Committee, but not without opposition.

A bill seeking to make it easier for firearm dealers to pay for the criminal background checks has unanimously passed its first Senate committee.

A bill giving a tax exemption on diapers and feminine hygiene products has cleared its first Florida Senate committee.

Governor Rick Scott says he wants about $200 million for Florida families who adopt foster kids.

With the 2018 legislative session around the corner, Florida lawmakers as well as child welfare stakeholders are starting to dive into how to address the huge turnover of the state’s child protective investigators. Their job is to look into cases called into the state’s child abuse hotline.

At Puerto Rico’s request, Florida Governor Rick Scott will travel to the devastated island Friday to offer advice about how to speed up efforts to restore the island’s power.

Bills aimed at fixing a glitch in a Florida law have cleared their first legislative committees in the House and Senate. The two measures could get more pro bono attorneys to help kids with special needs.

Bills paying tribute to former North Florida Republican Greg Evers are quickly moving through the legislature.

In the coming weeks, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice will be putting the finishing touches on a newly created office where juveniles and their families can raise concerns. That’s just one of the reforms the head of DJJ recently told a group of lawmakers, who had some suggestions of their own to address abuses within the system outlined in a Miami Herald investigative series.

Florida’s Guardian ad Litem program is asking the legislature for funding to reimburse its volunteers, who travel hundreds of miles for the abused and neglected kids they advocate for.

Amid an ongoing lawsuit, the Florida Department of Corrections is now asking the legislature for more than $19 million in funding to treat inmates with the Hepatitis C virus.

Despite a series of efforts, the Florida Department of Corrections is still facing a significant staffing shortage. The agency’s vacancy rates have more than doubled in the last year.

After many failed efforts, a group of Democratic Florida lawmakers are hoping this is the year the state legislature will close the pay gap between men and women.

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