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Robin Sussingham

Reporter/Host

Robin Sussingham is a reporter,pr oducer and host at WUSF Public Media.  A native of Lakeland, she hosts Florida Matters, the WUSF public affairs show, and frequently reports on events and issues in Polk County.

She came to WUSF from public radio stations KUER and KCPW in Utah, has contributed stories to NPR and Marketplace, and has an extensive background in newspapers, magazines and online reporting. 

Robin majored in chemistry at Duke University, and went to New York University for a Master's Degree in Science, Health, and Environmental Reporting. She's reported on everything from the Olympics to the oil spill, but will jump at a chance to talk about food or books.

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This week's Florida Matters features highlights from a recent town hall meeting in Tampa about school safety. The discussion took place in the wake of the school shootings at a high school in Parkland, and focused mainly on violence and gun control. 

This week on Florida Matters we debate the pros and cons of online learning in high school with a panel of experts and with comments our listeners submitted about their experience with virtual education.


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This week on Florida Matters, we're talking about the fact that every public high school student in Florida must take an online class in order to graduate, but some students and parents say it's not a good fit for everyone. Should an online class really be mandatory? 

We continue the conversation on the podcast, with Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham talking to the President and CEO of Florida Virtual School,  Dr. Jodi Marshall; Joanne Glenn, principal of Pasco County's eSchool; Carol Crawford, director of Club Z! In Home Tutoring Services; and Adam LeMee, Physics Teach-In-Residence for the University of Central Florida.

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On this week's podcast, we carry forward the conversation started at the St. Petersburg Conference on World Affairs about the connection between  international tourism and arts and culture in St. Petersburg. We hear about the Tampa airport's importance to the effort, and WUSF News Director Mary Shedden talks to Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham and producer Stephanie Colombini about the three new museums coming on line in St. Petersburg. Also, the meaning of "City of Green Benches" is explained.

 

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently moderated a panel discussion at the St. Petersburg Conference on World Affairs called "Arts Mecca: International Cultural Tourism in the Sunshine City." We talked with experts about how to draw culture-lovers from around the world to the Tampa Bay area.

This week on Florida Matters we'll hear highlights from that conversation.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently hosted a panel discussion in front of a live audience at the St. Petersburg Conference on World Affairs. We talked with experts about how the Tampa Bay Area is becoming a cultural mecca for international tourists.

We’ll hear highlights from that conversation on this week’s episode.


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After the horrific shooting at the Parkland high school, Florida Democrats have made gun control their political rallying cry. What will the fallout be -- in our schools and in our politics? Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham talks to WUSF's Steve Newborn, Zac Anderson of the Sarasota Herald Tribune, and Florida Matters producer Stephanie Colombini. Plus, can the upset win by a Democrat in a Sarasota House seat be seen as a bellwether?

Parkland shooting photo: Leslie Ovalle, WLRN

This week on Florida Matters we’re hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable.

We talk with a panel of journalists about some of the major news stories impacting our state, including last week’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people dead, a Democratic upset in a special election for Sarasota’s open state house seat, and the Tampa Bay Rays potential move to Ybor City.


Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

This week on Florida Matters we're hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable. We'll talk with a panel of journalists about some of the latest news stories impacting our state including last week's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people dead.

Steve Newborn / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we’re taking another listen to our conversation about the promise and prognosis of solar power in the Sunshine State.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently hosted a town hall event in St. Petersburg about providing health care to the uninsured. We'll hear highlights from the panel discussion and questions from the audience on this week's episode.


Andy Lalino / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we visit the office of St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman to talk about his second term in office, which began about a month ago.


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Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham sits down with St. Petersburg, Florida, Mayor Rick Kriseman, who's starting his second term. Mayor Kriseman worries about the "crazy stuff" going on in the Florida House, whether cities like his may lose their home-rule authority to the state, and he poses the possibility of taking a ferry to work.

The state’s lawmakers are hard at work in Tallahassee as the 2018 legislative session continues. This week on the latest edition of our monthly Florida Matters news roundtable series we’re talking about some of their priorities and how they could affect residents.


This week on Florida Matters we're hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable. We'll talk about some of the big issues to keep an eye on as the state's 2018 legislative session progresses and we’ll also discuss some of the politics behind them.


WUSF reporter Bobbie O'Brien knows her ice hockey, and she joins Robin Sussingham and Stephanie Colombini of Florida Matters for this week's podcast. Bobbie has looked into whether Tampa has truly become a hockey town, and gives us her findings. Plus, the gross things drunk people do during the Gasparilla festival will probably not surprise you.


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On this week's podcast, we've got the highly-regarded political analyst Susan MacManus in the studio to unpack Governor Rick Scott's last State of the State address. MacManus also answers the question of why Florida's national elections are so closely divided between Republicans and Democrats, while our state representatives are overwhelmingly Republican. Dr. MacManus joins WUSF's Florida Matters co-host Robin Sussingham and producer Stephanie Colombini.

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On this Florida Matters More podcast, we talk about whether ethnic newspapers' niche markets will help them survive the demise of  traditional print media. It may all depend on if they, like other print outlets, can figure out how to make money from their social media.

On this week's Florida Matters More podcast, host Robin Sussingham is joined by Zac Anderson of the Sarasota Herald Tribune; and WUSF's Steve Newborn. They discuss politicians who've shaken things up this year, like House Speaker Richard Corcoran and attorney John Morgan, plus what they consider the most under-reported stories of the year.

Be sure to subscribe to Florida Matters More, and get the view from the "other side of the mic" every week.

Massive hurricanes, corrupt politicians and the tragic death of a famous manatee – there was a lot of big news in Florida this year. This week on Florida Matters we talk with local journalists about some of 2017’s top local stories.


Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

Last week we shined a light on the historic neighborhood Progress Village and this week on Florida Matters its story continues.

In the second half of our special two-part series Telling Tampa Bay Stories: Progress Village we hear more residents of Tampa's first affordable housing suburb share their memories growing up there, and talk about how the neighborhood has changed.


On this podcast with Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham, WUSF News Director Mary Shedden and Florida Matters Producer Stephanie Colombini, hear more about the pioneering families of Tampa's Progress Village, and why the sense of community was so strong in that neighborhood. We ask whether the Progress Village elders have a lesson for us in how to build the bonds of community.

Sometimes when something is as universal, necessary and mundane as eating, it's hard to make "food" sound special. But not for the people on this Florida Matters.

WUSF has been talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways. Food...as muse.


Krayl Funch

Sometimes when something is as universal, necessary and mundane as eating, it's hard to make "food" sound special. But not for the people on this Florida Matters.

WUSF has been talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways. Food...as muse.

Our guests include:

WUSF Public Media

Throughout this past year, members of WUSF 89.7 and Classical WSMR have been highlighting live music that makes the Tampa Bay Area a little more special as part of our ongoing Art Populi series.

This week on Florida Matters we hear some of those stories.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

This is the Sunshine State, so doesn’t solar power make sense? Then why does it only make up a tiny fraction of Florida’s electricity output? This week on Florida Matters we’re talking about the promise and prognosis of solar energy in the state.


Books, music, authors, food -- it's time for the 25th annual Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading. This week on Florida Matters we're talking with three of the authors that will be featured in the event, held Saturday November 11 at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.


Robin Sussingham / WUSF

Lakeland voters rejected a change to a strong mayor form of government.

Nearly 69 percent of voters said no to the amendment to the city charter, which means that the city will continue to be governed by an elected city council and an appointed city manager.

This week on Florida matters we'll talk with three authors who will be featured during the upcoming Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading on November 11.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida’s power companies have invested billions and billions of dollars to harden the electrical grid since the hurricanes of 2004 and 2005. Could you tell?

If you lost power after Hurricane Irma – and 6.5 million homes did – it may have been hard to discern how things have improved in the last dozen years.


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