Renata Sago

Renata joined the WVIK News team in March 2014, as the Amy Helpenstell Foundation Fellow. She anchors during Morning Edition and All Things Consideredproduces features, and reports on everything from same-sex marriage legislation to unemployment in the Quad Cities. 

Renata fell into public radio after spending two years in France and Guadeloupe. She got her start as an intern for Worldview, a global affairs program that airs on WBEZ, Chicago's NPR member station. There, she produced a variety of segments covering politics and culture. She later joined Vocalo as a producer for two weekly programs.

Renata is Chicago native and a graduate of Brown University and Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane. 

This week, sheriffs across Florida publicly challenged the Department of Homeland Security for singling out agencies it says won’t help enforce immigration law. Meanwhile, sheriff’s offices are accusing DHS of misleading the public in a request, citing the agency for making requests that would violate people’s civil rights.

Here’s a short explanation of what’s happening:

State lawmakers are proposing to cut the budget for Orange and Osceola State Attorney’s office by $1.3 million and twenty-one positions.

Republican Rep. Scott Plakon of Longwood is steering the effort as part of the House Judiciary Appropriations Subcommittee, which released a draft of the budget on Monday.

“We thought that if she’s not going to do part of her job, basically, that we would withhold some of that money pending on what the governor does and so forth,” Plakon said in a phone interview.

color:#333333">A school devoted to teaching toddlers who are deaf and have difficulty hearing will open its doors Wednesday in Winter Park.


GunsHolstersAndGear / Wikimedia

Fifty people, including the gunman, died in Orlando’s Pulse nightclub on June 12, 2016, and Florida gun control advocates hoped lawmakers would be compelled to propose stricter gun laws. They urged a special legislative session.

When Florida voters go to vote on March 15, the state's voting machines may once again be in the spotlight.

Back in 2000, the nation's most spectacular elections meltdown took place in Florida thanks to the infamous paper butterfly ballots, ancient voting machines and poorly trained poll workers. The ensuing chaos led to a massive recount, a Supreme Court battle and a narrow victory for George W. Bush.