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Quincy J Walters

Quincy Walters is a reporter and backup host for WGCU.

He started in public radio as an intern at WUSF, the NPR member station for the Tampa Bay area. A year later, he was a production intern for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered in Washington, D.C. After Quincy’s internship, he returned to WUSF as a reporter.

His stories have aired on Weekend All Things Considered.

Quincy earned a degree in English with a concentration in creative writing from the University of South Florida.

It’s been over two months since Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, but Floridians are still dealing with mold and many are just now discovering they have it.

This week, Governor Rick Scott announced tax cuts he'd like to have in place for next year. But he also recently said he wants to spend almost $2 billion dollars on environmental projects. 


It’s now more than two weeks since Lee County’s Board of Commissioners sent a letter to the White House and U.S. Senators regarding the slow help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency after Hurricane Irma.  There’s been no response from FEMA or the White House.

The last shelter for Hurricane Irma in Florida closed over the weekend, and the people who left the shelter are now looking for transitional housing.

With the impending arrival of Hurricane Irma, thousands of Floridians left the state because of potential high storm surge, which is the rise of sea level that results from wind forces.

Doug Constantine from Cape Coral asked: "With FEMA recently scaring several million people into an evacuation, where they predicted storm surge of almost 20 feet and they were wrong and they’ve been wrong before. How many times can they yell the sky is falling?

Family members who fled Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria devastated their town of Coamo gathered for dinner in a Lehigh Acres home this week.


Puerto Ricans in Southwest Florida are having difficulty getting in contact with loved ones on the island since Hurricane Maria damaged power grids. 


The Federal Emergency Management Agency's Administrator was at the Lee County Emergency Operations Center Wednesday. 


Gov. Rick Scott visited the Florida Power & Light staging area at Southwest Florida International Airport on Tuesday. He also visited flooded areas of Southwest Florida.

Utility trucks, prepping to restore power to the region were lined up far into the horizon. Scott briefly spoke to reporters about the power situation in the area. 

"I've been to shelters. I know everyone wants their power back," said Scott. "It's the biggest thing we can do right now, but we gotta be safe about it." 

As Hurricane Irma closes in on Florida, and despite a slight shift, counties in the southwestern part of the state are bracing for impact. 


President Donald Trump’s proposed cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget have some people on edge, especially in Florida. People associated with the Environmental Defense Fund or EDF aired grievances Tuesday morning. The proposed budget goes into effect Oct. 1, but  people from the EDF say now is the time to act.

You may have heard of feral cats, but have you heard of feral chickens? Feral chickens are now the subject of evolutionary research. And the ones in Tampa's Ybor City and Key West are perfect fodder to study. 


As Tropical Storm Emily made landfall Monday, two Florida Congressmen got a lesson in how water is managed in Collier County. Their visit came after they helped secure millions of dollars for Everglades restoration. 

Toxic algal blooms have been happening more often in the rivers off Lake Okeechobee. One of the main causes is phosphorous runoff from wastewater and farmland. But a new filter may make algal blooms caused by wastewater a thing of the past. 

At Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Naples, the landscape is quintessential Florida. There's the marsh area with towering cypress trees and there's the wet prairie. 

It's what Florida looked like hundreds of years ago. And it's one of the places where people were tallying butterflies for the North American Butterfly Association's (NABA) summer count. 

The infrastructure that prevents Lake Okeechobee from spilling over is old. And that's why Congress allocated $49.6 million to help repair it this fiscal year. 

U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL), who's the founder and Co-Chairman of the Everglades Caucus, toured the Herbert Hoover Dike on Lake Okeechobee Monday. He got an update on the dike's rehabilitation projects from the Commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville district. 

Gregory Adkins, superintendent of The School District of Lee County, held a press conference backed by about 50 district employees.

"We demand Governor Rick Scott veto House Bill 7069," he said, standing at a lectern. 

Adkins was referring to contentious legislation that concerns K-12 education in the state. Last month, the district sent a letter to the governor, asking that HB 7069 be vetoed. 

Hurricane season is looming and so is the deadline for the National Flood Insurance Program to be reauthorized. 

When a child dies, it affects a whole community. That's why every other month, people from hospitals, law enforcement and health departments review cases of criminal or accidental deaths of kids. It's called the Child Death Review. Monday, the group focused on accidental deaths in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry and Lee counties, because it says those deaths go up as school gets out for summer. 

  Saturday is "Lionfish Awareness and Removal Day" in Florida. Lionfish are an invasive species off Florida's coasts. People in southwest Florida are studying the fish's impact and others are helping to keep the invasive species' population under control. 

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