Peter Haden

Peter Haden joined WJCT in 2014 as an award-winning investigative reporter and photographer. His stories are featured in media outlets around the world including NPR, CNN en Español, ECTV Ukraine, USA Today, Qatar Gulf Times, and the Malaysia Star.

He holds a Master of Mass Communication degree from Arizona State University's Cronkite School and bachelor's degrees in Geography and International Studies from the University of Iowa.

After growing up on an Iowa sheep farm, Peter has lived and worked in Ukraine, Chile, Mexico, Washington D.C., Georgia, Arizona and Florida.

His current mission is to tell the greatest stories on earth - in three minutes and thirty seconds.

Ty Hernandez was mending a broken heart when he felt a cold coming on.

His mom, Peggy, did the mom thing.

“You’ve got to rest and drink fluids.” she said. “The next morning, I left a note on the counter with some chicken noodle soup and said, ‘I hope you feel better. Call me if you need anything.’ And I went to work.”

Law enforcement officials are warning of a deadly new drug hitting South Florida streets called “grey death.”

A South Florida drug treatment provider will spend the next 27.5 years behind bars for operating a multimillion-dollar health care fraud and sex trafficking scheme.

U.S. District Judge Donald Middlebrooks handed down the sentence Wednesday at the Federal Courthouse in West Palm Beach. Kenneth “Kenny” Chatman, 47, of Boynton Beach, pleaded guilty in March to the charges.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Marie Villafaña said Chatman was a relatively small provider in the drug treatment industry, but he was, “the most dangerous.”

Kathy Kino has been helping people during some of their most vulnerable times since she began volunteering at a hospital when she was 13. She worked as a trauma nurse and a hospital chaplain for more than 15 years, and now she’s a nursing professor.

This is National Nurses Week, and Kino spoke with WLRN about how becoming a patient herself changed the way she thinks about her profession:

The man had just risen from the dead.

He’s in his mid-20’s. Sitting on a couch in a house in Delray Beach. Pale as a ghost, sweaty, wide-eyed, disoriented.  Like he just woke up from a nightmare.

The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is prepared for a major security operation, with not one  but two world leaders in town this weekend.

Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw says it’s the biggest security operation he’s ever run. And he wants to be clear. Protesting? OK. Civil disobedience? No.


“We are not going to tolerate any civil disobedience, throwing of objects or any other type of disorderly conduct whatsoever,” said Bradshaw.

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping arrive Thursday afternoon.

A group of top economists and innovators met in Palm Beach Monday to sound an alarm: radical change is coming to the American workforce.

Around 3,000 protesters took to the streets of West Palm Beach Saturday, hoping to be seen by President Donald Trump.

As the addiction recovery industry boomed in South Florida over the past decade, so did the number of recovery residences - also known as sober homes.

A task force is making recommendations to state legislators for cracking down on fraud in the addiction recovery industry.

The Palm Beach County Sober Homes Task Force is putting the finishing touches on a report headed to lawmakers in Tallahassee. It outlines strategies to better regulate drug treatment providers and sober homes.

Among the recommendations: Give the state Department of Children and Families (DCF) the ability to license and inspect commercial sober homes.

The man leading the fight against unscrupulous sober homes has a message for state legislators.

“When the appropriations process comes up, please keep us in mind,” said Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg at a meeting with the Palm Beach County Legislative Delegation in Boca Raton Tuesday.

Aronberg leads the county’s Sober Home Task Force - created in July 2016 with a $275,000 appropriation from the state legislature.

Lawyers representing 142 retired NFL players filed a federal lawsuit against the NFL Monday in Fort Lauderdale.

They want the league to recognize CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, as an occupational hazard that should be covered by workers compensation.

Tony Gaiter, 42, is the lead plaintiff in the suit.

He played for the University of Miami, before going on to play for the New England patriots and the San Diego Chargers.

A Broward county judge heard testimony from six witnesses today (Thursday) in a case involving ballots missing Amendment 2, the “medical marijuana” question. Among the witnesses was Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes. County election officials confirmed four ballots went out without the Amendment 2 question. Those voters were issues new ballots to correct the problem.

Two more Broward voters realized Tuesday that their absentee ballots lacked the medical marijuana question, according to the Miami Herald.

This came just hours after a Broward County judge said she would rule quickly on a case involving ballots missing Amendment 2.

Two Oakland Park voters received ballots last week that did not have the question pertaining to Amendment 2, which would legalize marijuana statewide for medical use. The Broward Supervisor of Elections said they were “test-ballots” sent out accidentally.

This has been one of those weeks in South Florida when there’s a lot of water in the streets, even when the sun’s out. It’s a King Tide week. Business people, scientists and local officials got together in a Fort Lauderdale conference room with the water rising outside the building to talk about the problem.

A Jacksonville woman went home from prison yesterday after originally being sentenced to 20 years for firing a warning shot at her estranged husband. Marissa Alexander will serve two years under house arrest but a judge stopped short of tacking on two additional years of probation prosecutors had sought.

Dozens of activists descended on the Duval County Courthouse lawn Tuesday afternoon. The caravans traveled from as far away as Berkeley, California, all for the expected release of Marissa Alexander.

Annie Thomas came from Miami with the Power U Center for Social Change.

The Florida Park Service invites the public to start 2015 outdoors by participating in First Day Hikes.

On New Year's Day, many Florida State Parks are offering free guided hikes for the public. This year there are more than 30 events throughout the state, including at parks in St. Augustine, Flagler Beach, and Palatka.

Most of the January 1st hikes begin at 10 a.m.

The events are part of a national initiative by America’s State Parks to get people outside and healthy.

Florida is missing out on clean energy jobs. That’s the finding of a new report released Wednesday.