Nick Evans

Nick Evans is a masters student in communications at Florida State University.  Before moving to Tallahassee, Nick lived in and around the San Francisco Bay Area for 15 years.  He listens to far too many podcasts and is a die-hard 49ers football fan.  When Nick’s not at work he likes to cook, play music and read.

Public Service Commissioner Lisa Edgar won’t seek a fourth term.  That may give the inside track to Governor Rick Scott’s favored insurance commissioner nominee.

Florida’s Cabinet is at odds over who should become the state’s next Insurance Commissioner.  The candidate search is back on, and Cabinet officials are hoping to agree on a successor at their next meeting.

The Florida Senate is sending a medical marijuana proposal to the governor.  The reform package grants access to terminal patients and carries a number of changes for the existing regulatory system.

There’s just one hurdle left for a Miami-Dade needle exchange program.  The long-awaited pilot passed the House Wednesday.

Medical cannabis legislation is heading to the Senate floor for the second time after a clash in committee.  But time is running out for the proposal to gain passage in both chambers before session closes.

The Florida Senate will again take up a medical marijuana bill today.  It expands the scope of Florida's Right to Try Act, which allows terminally-ill patients to try drugs not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The measure emerged from the rules committee Monday.

Florida women seeking an abortion will now have to wait 24 hours and make a separate trip to their physician.  This comes after an appeals court overturned a ruling putting the law on hold.

The Florida House is moving forward with a new capital sentencing scheme after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the existing system just over a month ago.  But even with last minute changes, lawmakers are hesitant to completely embrace unanimity.

The House Health and Human services committee sent two measures to the floor that would’ve been unthinkable just a few years ago.  The full House will now consider a needle exchange pilot program and a new medical marijuana proposal.

Lawmakers are pushing a measure encouraging the use of abuse-resistant opioids. 

Monday, Senators took up two civil asset forfeiture bills that pursue slightly different policies to rein in the controversial practice.

Lawmakers reiterated an old, familiar truism Wednesday: all politics is local.  A squabble over where to base Florida’s Second District Court of Appeal brought out hometown loyalties.

There are few issues that find more support among the Republican Party than guns, and Florida’s GOP dominated statehouse is no exception.  When lawmakers return to Tallahassee for the 2016 regular session, they’ll be coming back loaded for bear.

State health officials have selected the five nurseries charged with growing medical marijuana but their job is far from done.  Wednesday they laid out a set of rules to ensure nurseries grow the plant safely and securely.

Although the Department of Health has awarded licenses to grow cannabis, patients could still be waiting more than nine months for treatment.  But one of the nurseries is hoping to push that timeline forward.

Florida’s senators want to drop the confederate flag from the chamber’s seal.  The proposed rule change passed committee Thursday unanimously.

State health officials are nearing a decision on who will get to grow medical marijuana in the Florida.  Meanwhile two lawmakers are hoping to expand the pool of eligible patients.

Florida is still grappling with the pill mill crisis of four years ago.  But with the problem of too many prescriptions receding in the rear-view mirror, the problem now is too few.

The mutual recriminations over Florida’s congressional borders are hardly finished echoing in the halls of the state Capitol.  But a group of Florida lawmakers want to put an end to the argument—permanently.

The Legislature will begin its special session next week, but drafting of the base map—the session’s starting point—has already begun.  Voting rights groups are upset it isn’t happening in public.

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