Nick Evans

Nick Evans is a masters student in communications at Florida State University.  Before moving to Tallahassee, Nick lived in and around the San Francisco Bay Area for 15 years.  He listens to far too many podcasts and is a die-hard 49ers football fan.  When Nick’s not at work he likes to cook, play music and read.

There are few issues that find more support among the Republican Party than guns, and Florida’s GOP dominated statehouse is no exception.  When lawmakers return to Tallahassee for the 2016 regular session, they’ll be coming back loaded for bear.

State health officials have selected the five nurseries charged with growing medical marijuana but their job is far from done.  Wednesday they laid out a set of rules to ensure nurseries grow the plant safely and securely.

Although the Department of Health has awarded licenses to grow cannabis, patients could still be waiting more than nine months for treatment.  But one of the nurseries is hoping to push that timeline forward.

Florida’s senators want to drop the confederate flag from the chamber’s seal.  The proposed rule change passed committee Thursday unanimously.

State health officials are nearing a decision on who will get to grow medical marijuana in the Florida.  Meanwhile two lawmakers are hoping to expand the pool of eligible patients.

Florida is still grappling with the pill mill crisis of four years ago.  But with the problem of too many prescriptions receding in the rear-view mirror, the problem now is too few.

The mutual recriminations over Florida’s congressional borders are hardly finished echoing in the halls of the state Capitol.  But a group of Florida lawmakers want to put an end to the argument—permanently.

The Legislature will begin its special session next week, but drafting of the base map—the session’s starting point—has already begun.  Voting rights groups are upset it isn’t happening in public.

More than 600 Florida guardsmen are on their way to the horn of Africa.  They’ll participate in Operation Enduring Freedom.

Southern governments at the state and local level have been reassessing the confederate battle flag.  Tuesday Walton County took a middle path, replacing the current flag with an earlier version.

In about two weeks state lawmakers will gather in Tallahassee to redraw Florida’s congressional borders.  And the scope of those changes is turning races across the state into a game of musical chairs.

Democrats are up in arms over Republican presidential hopeful Jeb Bush’s recent comments about Medicare.  The former Florida Governor suggests Medicare be phased out.

Tasting rooms at Florida’s craft distilleries could be getting a bit busier soon.  Florida law may soon allow distillers to sell more bottles in face to face transactions.

The Florida Cabinet discussed performance metrics Tuesday for reviewing the work of agency heads.  The protracted venture stretches back to the bungled ouster of former state law enforcement chief Gerald Bailey.

Florida sheriffs gathered in Tallahassee Monday to honor those who lost their lives last year in the line of duty.  The Florida Sheriff’s association memorialized three deputies including Leon County’s Chris Smith.

When the House called an end to the 2015 session, a lot of major legislation died—but not everything.  The Senate was able to pass along a final few bills to the Governor in the waning hours.

A proposal mandating an abortion waiting period took center stage Tuesday on the House floor.  But lawmakers discussed a handful of other measures that could affect health administration in the state, too.

Florida appears primed to extend the statute of limitations for rape charges.  The proposal is headed for the Senate floor, less than a week after passing the House unanimously.

Two very different alcohol measures came before their final committee Wednesday.  But even though they began to converge, only one passed its final stop.

Senators could soon be voting on a measure prohibiting certain organizations from using public funds for litigation against the state.  The proposal’s critics worry about unintended consequences.

Pages