Nadege Green

Nadege Green loves only-in-Miami stories. After five years as a Miami Herald reporter, she is convinced Miami is the best news town ever. Really, you can’t make up some of the stuff that happens here.

Nadege has covered local city governments and as a sub-beat, Miami’s Haitian community.

She is a graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Arnetta Gordon is a Miami-Dade public school teacher.  After leaving Miami to escape Hurricane Irma with her husband and four children, she returned to her Liberty City home which like thousands of others had no electricity.  Gordon has a 9-month old infant who she breastfeeds.

She wrote WLRN about the challenges of breastfeeding with no power:

Days after Hurricane Irma battered South Florida, Rufus James walked through his Liberty City neighborhood in Miami looking for paid work to chop down trees and clean up yards.

Like many Floridians, James, 57, was going on day four with no electricity. At home, he had three grandchildren to feed. They’re eating “cornflakes and whatever we can come up with. I’m looking for some food,” he said.

Before the storm, James said he worked odd jobs — helping elderly neighbors mow their lawns or move heavy items. Post storm, no one was paying for help yet.

Eugene Johnson purchased two loaves of bread and batteries for his flashlight. Those are his supplies in preparation for Hurricane Irma.

“I’m on fixed income,” said Johnson. “This hit me out of the blue. I had to pay my rent, my electricity bill and stuff like that.”

In his kitchen cabinet he already had a few cans of tuna and he plans to boils some eggs.

Johnson, 65, lives in an affordable housing complex in Miami and, like many of his neighbors who are also on fixed or limited income, he doesn’t own a car.

Megan Hobson was 16 years old when she was caught in the crossfire of a drive-by shooting in Miami Gardens.

Heidy Rodriguez, 17, created an LGBTQ support group at her Miami-Dade high school when she realized that like her, many of her friends needed a place to share their struggles and successes.

A new gun club in South Florida is geared towards training black gun owners and teaching people to support the Second Amendment within the black community.

A group of students at Miami Norland Senior High in Miami Gardens spent part of their freshman year writing about their lives in poems and short stories.

The loss of a parent, struggling with low self-esteem, racism and homelessness are among the central themes in the narratives they penned about themselves.

Now sophomores, some of their works are collected in a new self-published book, “iRead, iThink, iWrite.”

Florida Sen. Frank Artiles, a Republican, resigned last month after the Miami Herald revealed he had said the n-word and called a fellow senator, Audrey Gibson, a “bitch”.

Artiles also referred to Gibson, a black woman, as “girl.”

Marsha Halper

You'll often hear the news of young people tragically dying from gun violence. But what about those who live?

Jaden Piner started acting because his grandma made him do it.

She was preaching at church one Sunday and needed a visual element for her sermon. She tapped the then fifth grader to act out her words on the pulpit.

“She was talking about when you overcome certain struggles,” said Jaden, 13. “So I had a brick in a bag and I had to act like I couldn't pick it up because it was a struggle.”

Poison Ivy came out as a transgender woman to her family in January.

Her grandmother kicked her out of the house. 

“She didn’t want to see me transitioning,” said Poison Ivy, who asked that her real name not be used. “It’s just so hard for her to notice that her grandson, someone that has loved her for a long time is becoming a woman.”

So Poison Ivy moved in with friends. Some of them don’t know what the 18-year-old does for a living.

Charles Williams is sitting at a table with two of the young men he mentors. They get together at least twice a week.

On this day, they’re talking about sex. More specifically,  about protection.

“In the heat of the moment sometimes, a guy doesn't necessarily reach for a condom,” Williams tells Dwayne Jackson, 14, and Traivon Harris, 15. 

The boys get bashful and chuckle at William’s blunt delivery.

 

According to an FBI report released this week, almost all of the FBI’s experts who conducted microscopic hair analysis gave flawed testimony in criminal trials.

Gas prices in Florida are going up.

Some gas stations are already increasing prices by about 10 cents and that’s normal around this time of the year.

According to the auto club AAA,  seasonal demand and maintenance are the causes for the gas price increase.

As we approach spring, prices usually rise between 30 and 35 cents.

But it’s not all that bad. Even when station gas prices do go up this spring, the national average is not expected to surpass $3 dollars a gallon. 

Clergy members across the country have a message  for the North Miami Beach Police Department in response to using  mugshots of black men for target practice: Use me instead.

The #UseMeInstead social media movement took off after a bullet-riddled image of six black men was found by one of the men’s sisters at a Medley gun range. The image sparked national outrage.

About a week after news broke that North Miami Beach police officers were using mugshots of black men for target practice, the city’s police chief J. Scott Dennis met quietly with a group of black residents to apologize in an emergency meeting.

The North Miami Beach Police Department has been using mugshots of young black men for target practice during sniper drills.

The practice drew international headlines after Valerie Deant recognized her brother’s mugshot on a bullet-riddled target sheet at a Medley gun range after North Miami Beach police left.

Many of Florida’s immigration organizations and nonprofits are preparing to meet the demands of President Obama’s recent executive action on immigration.

The president’s plan mostly covers undocumented immigrants who have been living in the United States for more than five years and have children who were born here.

Those with no criminal records will qualify for work permits.

Before Cardinal Chibly Langlois celebrated Mass at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church in Little Haiti, he took it all in.

A banner with his likeness hung from a black fence.

Parishioners wore yellow T-shirts with a picture of his face on the front and on the back, a message in Creole thanking God for blessing them with the first-ever Haitian cardinal.

Hundreds of mourners gathered at Temple Beth Am in Pinecrest to remember Steven Sotloff, the South Florida native who was killed ​b​y militant extremists in Iraq.

​Video of Sotloff's beheading was released earlier this week.

On Friday afternoon,​ ​about 600 friends,​ ​family and complete strangers came together in memory of Sotloff.

"They want to celebrate his life, not just his death," said Robert Hersh, executive director of Temple Beth Am.

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