Matthew F Smith

Matthew Smith is a reporter and producer of WGCU’s Gulf Coast Live.

Originally from Delaware, he moved to Alaska in 2010 for his first job in radio. He spent five years working as a radio and television reporter, as well as a radio producer, talk show host, and news director at stations across Alaska, where his reporting received awards from the Alaska Press Club and the Alaska Broadcasters Association. Relocating to southwest Florida, he spent several months producing television news before joining WGCU as the Gulf Coast Live producer in August 2016.

Matthew studied English and journalism at Villanova University in Villanova, PA, where he wrote for the school newspaper and other school publications. He taught English as a Second Language for several years before pursuing a career in journalism.

The American Red Cross and the Salvation Army continue their relief efforts more than one week after Hurricane Irma devastated South Florida. Tens of thousands of meals are being served and emergency shelters remain open. But full recovery is still to come: both agencies say they need more volunteers, and ongoing sewage and water quality concerns are fueling concerns of a potential health crisis.

The numbers of employed Floridians barely able to afford basic living expenses has seen some improvements in Florida, according new data from the United Way. Economic recovery has helped some households struggling to make ends meet, but new data for Florida finds wages still lag behind major increases in housing, childcare, healthcare, and more. And the United Way says the disparity between take-home pay and household costs is increasingly affecting households in minority communities.

Undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children face an uncertain future in Florida and across the country as the the federal program that's given them paperwork for school and jobs and shielded them from deportation faces a pivotal moment under the Trump Administration. Trump is expected to decide by Sept. 5 whether to end or renew the program known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Five central Florida cities are teaming up with the ridesharing company Uber to offer discounts on rides within the five-city area, as well as to various SunRail stations. The citys tout the partnership between a major technology company and government as a way to deliver "alternative transit options" that also help reduce the number of cars on the road.

At the end of September, the National Flood Insurance Program will expire unless Congress acts to re-authorize its funding. Many in the real estate and insurance industries say they're cautiously optimistic the federal flood insurance subsidy will be kept in place, but there’s no guarantee amid the chaotic climate in Washington. 

He led the Florida Seminole Tribe when it challenged the U.S. Supreme Court over gaming on tribal lands. The legal victory helped kick start a gambling industry now estimated at more than $33 billion. Now former Seminole Chief James Billie wants to do for marijuana what the tribes achieved for gaming, aiming to make tribal producers the source for marijuana in a growing number of states that have legalized recreational and medical use of the drug.

An underwater archaeology site on the bed of the Silver River, in the Silver Springs State Park near Ocala, is home to mammoth bones and other ancient remains dating back 10,000 years ago. First discovered in the 1970s, the history these discoveries revealed were dismissed at the time due to the perceived inaccuracy of underwater archaeology. This summer, a team of archeologists are diving there to "set the record straight."

In a Sarasota neighborhood with no doctor’s offices and little access to health care, a new clinic in Newtown is bringing medical care and so much more. 

While most of the complaints about Southwest Florida's recent rainy weather center on the comeback of the annoying mosquito, the rain brings out another animal that can pose a serious threat to dogs: the cane toad, whose poison glands can sicken pets. Even the tadpoles can be highly toxic if ingested. 

A bill  before lawmakers in Congress would require car makers install technology reminding drivers when a child is in the back seat. It’s a move to help prevent the occurrence of “forgotten baby syndrome,” where a child is accidentally left in a car as potentially fatal temperatures soar. The “Hot Cars” Act is getting bi-partisan support since it was unveiled earlier this month in Washington DC. 

Florida lawmakers returned to Tallahassee for a busy three-day special session last week, ending with new agreements on school spending, tourism and business incentives, and medical marijuana but leaving in place many of Gov. Rick Scott's vetoes, and questions about the session's last-minute deals unanswered.

With more than 11,000 miles of rivers, coastlines, and waterways, new U.S. Coast Guard data shows Florida leads the nation in boating accidents and boating deaths, a trend that has been growing in Florida and nationwide since 2013.

The first case of canine influenza, or "dog flu," was confirmed in Florida this week. More than a dozen cases of the highly contagious H3N2 canine flu virus has been identified in northern and central Florida since the first diagnosis, including cases in the Orlando area.

Despite a months-long season for red snapper in state waters off Florida and other Gulf states, fisherman across the Gulf of Mexico are gearing up to protest a brief three-day opening to catch the prized fish in federal Gulf waters. Fishermen argue a short opening hurts businesses and hampers anglers across the Gulf, but fishery managers say a small window is important to preserve a species still recovering from overfishing.

New research shows the Zika virus was likely in the state earlier than health officials had previously thought—and had arrived in the state on multiple occasions.

A small team of paramedics  is quietly transforming community health in Manatee County, scheduling house calls and building relationships with patients who would otherwise be frequent visitors to emergency rooms and regularly calling 911.

Just this month Brazil—the country where experts say the Zika virus first arose—ended its nationwide health emergency related to the virus. The World Health Organization took a similar step in November. But as the summer mosquito season in Florida begins, the threat from Zika remains acute for South Florida and other parts of the world where the mosquitoes carrying the virus can be found.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Hurricane Center issues its 2017 Hurricane season outlook Thursday. NOAA meteorologist Jamie Rhome explains what’s in store for Southwest Florida in the months ahead.  

A brood of salt marsh mosquitoes borne from high tides along Southwest Florida’s coastal mangroves descended on Collier County this week, unleashing a “horrendous” torrent of insects that experts say is the worst they’ve seen in a decade.

Could the next car you buy drive itself? As technology for self-driving or "autonomous" vehicles improves, Florida lawmakers, transportation officials, and businesses are positioning the state as one of the leading test beds for driverless cars.

Lee County is making its own preparations, and the Tampa-Hillsborough Expressway Authority is just one of three pilot projects in the country getting federal Department of Transportation dollars. 

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