Mary Shedden

News Director

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF.

Since arriving at WUSF in 2013, she has worked as a reporter and as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Shedden has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Shedden at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email.

Ways to Connect

Share Your Obamacare Questions

Feb 26, 2014

As the deadline for getting health insurance nears, you might have some questions about how the Affordable Care Act affects you.

Well, here's your chance to ask.

We want to help sort out all of these changes resulting triggered by Obamacare, especially the looming March 31 deadline that nearly all Americans get coverage.

On an upcoming episode of Florida Matters on WUSF, we will ask a panel of experts to give practical answers to the questions important to you and your family.

Ernestine Marshall's every move is being watched: morning, noon and night. 

Motion-activated sensors are everywhere in her Tampa apartment: on the toilet, the front door, even the kitchen cabinet where she stores medications help manage her multiple sclerosis.

Republicans have had control of the Florida Legislature and governor's office since 1999 and have used their power to restrict abortions, loosen gun laws, strip state workers of benefits, allow private school vouchers and enact a slew of other policy changes that Democrats opposed but could do nothing to stop.

Cancer hospitals vying to earn National Cancer Institute designation would get $60 million next year under a budget proposal being released by Florida Gov. Rick Scott today.

Scott, who is running for a second term as governor, made Tampa’s Moffitt Cancer Center the final stop of his “It’s Your Money Tax Cut Budget” tour on Tuesday. Flanked by dozens of researchers, university leaders and politicians, he said the $60 million proposal can help cancer centers invest in the research needed to earn the prestigious title.

When teachers ask this fall, “What did you do on your summer vacation?”  nearly four dozen Tampa teenagers will answer, “I spent it at the James A. Haley VA Hospital.”

For more than a decade, Haley has been operating a summer Youth Volunteer program that gives teenagers insight into health care careers while at the same time helping veterans.

Shrinking public health budgets in Florida and other states are making it harder to protect and control potential infectious outbreaks, according to a new report.

Florida scored five of 10 possible points on the Trust for America’s Health report released this morning. Georgia, Nebraska and New Jersey received the lowest score: two out of 10. New Hampshire was the top scoring state, earning points for eight of the 10 criteria.

Shrinking public health budgets in Florida and other states are making it harder to protect and control potential infectious outbreaks, according to a new report.

Florida scored five of 10 possible points on the Trust for America’s Health report released this morning. Georgia, Nebraska and New Jersey received the lowest score: two out of 10. New Hampshire was the top scoring state, earning points for eight of the 10 criteria.

Many of us have great memories of our college dorm experiences, and according to two roommates, you couldn’t have found a better place and time then the third floor of Jennings Hall at the University of Florida in 1982.

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