Mary Shedden

News Director

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF.

Since arriving at WUSF in 2013, she has worked as a reporter and as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Shedden has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Shedden at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email.

Ways to Connect

Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

  With the third year of open enrollment under way on Healthcare.gov, President Barack Obama is focusing his efforts on people eligible to buy policies on the insurance marketplace.

Political battles over expanding Medicaid in states including Florida are important, but not as easy to win, he told WUSF in an Oval Office interview Thursday.

WUSF

President Barack Obama’s administration is battling its own success with health insurance enrollment.

It’s been nearly three years since Americans started signing up on insurance exchanges like HealthCare.gov; 17.6 million more people across the nation are covered.

The latest SurveyUSA poll, conducted for Bay News 9/News 13, shows former Gov. Jeb Bush receiving a lowest-ever 7 percent of the Republican presidential vote, trailing fourth-place Texas Sen. Ted Cruz (10 percent), Florida Sen. Marco Rubio (16 percent) and Dr. Ben Carson (17 percent). Businessman Donald Trump surged to 37 percent. This is Bush’s worst showing yet in any Florida survey, and it highlights just how far the former front-runner has fallen. A University of North Florida poll last month showed Bush in fourth place with 9 percent in the Republican race. Bush’s campaign team has been in damage control for weeks and suggests the candidate is ready to rise.

One of the largest hospital systems in the Tampa Bay area is expanding its reach with the purchase of a Polk County hospital.

Health care has been a hot-button policy issue for years in the Florida Legislature, and it’s starting to look like the session scheduled to start on Jan. 12 will be no different.

It seems Florida lawmakers aren't the only ones who can't agree. Residents also are divided over key economic and social issues, according to the latest release of the Sunshine State Survey.

The 41-year old Re­pub­lic­an first ran for elec­ted of­fice just over a year ago in a spe­cial House elec­tion that drew na­tion­al at­ten­tion and big spend­ing in the slightly Demo­crat­ic-tilt­ing dis­trict. But Jolly is a vic­tim of re­dis­trict­ing: a mid-dec­ade re­draw of Flor­ida’s con­gres­sion­al lines makes his dis­trict sig­ni­fic­antly more Demo­crat­ic. Left with little hope of re­tain­ing the seat, Jolly im­me­di­ately began pre­paring for a Sen­ate bid. Jolly hin­ts that his mod­el of break­ing with his party fits his evenly di­vided con­gres­sion­al dis­trict, it’s not one that’s won him any fa­vor with con­ser­vat­ive groups.

Update: 3:50 p.m. Mallory Deason, communications director for the Agency for Health Care Administration, released the following statement in regards to the Politico Florida story.

“This morning, Politico Florida published an article that claimed that AHCA has not been forthcoming regarding a public records request they filed. The article claimed that our office has not been responsive when, in fact, AHCA communication’s staff has been in constant contact with Politico regarding this request, including several updates via telephone last week.

Pinellas County

The Atlanta Braves are talking about moving their spring training home out of Orlando, and Pinellas County is one of the contenders.

Florida’s Surgeon General announced he has been diagnosed with colon cancer and will be undergoing surgery today.

The news from Dr. John Armstrong came late Thursday afternoon, in a statement from the Florida Department of Health. His top deputy will be in charge during his absence.

“As I focus on my recovery, Dr. Celeste Philip will have delegated authority and has my full confidence,” the statement read.

Tampa Police Dept.

UPDATED AT 9/10 12:30 AM with details on arrest of suspect and Judy Genshaft's comments.
Tampa Police announced that a 23-year-old man is being charged in an incident that left former University of South Florida football player Elkino Watson dead and current USF student Desmond Horne injured. 

Randolph Graham, 23, turned himself in at Tampa Police headquarters Wednesday night. Graham, who was joined by his lawyer, will be charged with second-degree murder with a weapon and attempted murder with a weapon, police said.

Steve Newborn / WUSF

In 2013, Florida had more new cases of HIV than anywhere else in the nation. When it comes to the presence of HIV in Florida, the state’s six largest metropolitan areas could be states unto themselves.

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

Though a flood watch is underway for the Tampa Bay area, public school districts from Pinellas to Hillsborough to Polk have announced they will be open as normal on Monday.

Friday’s concerns that Tropical Storm Erika would strike the Tampa Bay area dissipated over the weekend, and families in the three districts were notified that students, teachers and other employees should report to class and work as normal.

Matthew Paulson / Creative Commons

Tampa is the best place to live in the entire Southeast United States, according to Money Magazine.

New jobs at companies such as Amazon and Bristol-Myers Squibb were among the reasons Tampa ranked as the top Southeastern city in the Best Places to Live 2015 report. It looked at the job market, housing costs, access to health care and other amenities such as the expanded flights at Tampa International Airport.

The other top cities included Denver, Omaha, Pittsburgh and Mesa, Arizona.

The WUSF News team collected eight awards at the Society of Professional Journalists Sunshine State Awards in Miami this past weekend.

Morning Edition host Carson Cooper was named Anchor of the Year in Florida, besting television and radio anchors from across the state.

An investigation into doctors performing common elective surgeries is placing the spotlight on a Citrus County physician and hospital.

The non-profit news organization ProPublica sorted 2.3 million low-risk procedures on Medicare patients - from hip and knee replacements to back surgery. It published its Surgeon Scorecard on eight different procedures on Tuesday.

Baby boomers dominate the nation’s population.

But analysts watching the health care economy say it’s the youngest health care consumers who are shaping the future health care economy.

Thirty years ago, a HIV-positive diagnosis was a death sentence, and gay men and IV-drug users were most likely to get infected.

Today, the demographics of infection have changed a lot, and advancements in drug treatment that make HIV a "chronic disease" have created a new set of problems.

Everyone thinks HIV happens to someone else.

It only infects men who are having sex with men, they say. Or HIV drug users.

And while that still accounts for about half of all people infected, those who are being diagnosed with this serious sexually transmitted disease don’t fall into simple categories. They’re young and old, straight, gay and transgender, of every race.

In a business plan filed with the state, USF said the project would unite researchers, patients at Tampa General Hospital, the existing USF Center for Advanced Medical Learning and Simulation and corporate space in Vinik's planned office, residential and entertainment district. The USF project is seen as an anchor for Vinik's larger $1 billion redevelopment in downtown Tampa. City Hall and Hills­borough County are expected to spend up to $30 million on street and infrastructure improvements. Vinik's development company plans to build a medical office building and parking garage on the site with a value estimated at $90 million. USF had said that being close to Tampa General would help the heart institute attract researchers who would bring in an estimated $28 million more per year in research grants, and a more robust research environment would draw biotech start-ups to downtown.

Pages