Mary Shedden

News Director

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF.

Since arriving at WUSF in 2013, she has worked as a reporter and as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Shedden has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Shedden at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email.

Ways to Connect

Pulitzers.org

This week, the annual Pulitzer Prizes were announced.

And while critics like President Trump may call it a celebration of the “failing” media, the announcement really was what it’s always been: a recognition of remarkable journalism.

CaitlynJenner.com

The Associated Press made news right here in Tampa Bay recently, when leaders announced at the American Society of Copy Editors convention a change to a longtime piece of language.

CNN

There seems to be no shortage of opinionated voices in today’s media.

On cable TV, where pundits and politicians seem to spar around the clock, you could say it's overwhelming. But that’s not the case for American newspapers, where opinion pages are becoming endangered.

Cathy Carter / WUSF

MLB spring training is well underway, and there's a lot of talk about multimillion dollar renovations at Tampa Bay area stadiums. They're supported in part by local tax dollars.

The Detroit Tigers have unveiled a revamped facility in Lakeland. The New York Yankees have done the same in Tampa, and Dunedin is planning upgrades for the Toronto Blue Jays. Sarasota County is opting to start from ground zero, potentially investing in a new $75 million facility for the Atlanta Braves.

MyFloridaHouse.gov

Governor Rick Scott kicked off Florida's 2017 legislative session with his annual State of the State Address. This week on Florida Matters we're re-broadcasting portions of the governor's speech, which aired live on WUSF 89.7.


Facebook’s the primary news gateway for a lot of Americans. And while most people on it know it's a haven for fake news, we may be getting gamed by those sites more than we realize.

FBI Archives

No one wants to be arrested. But fact is it happens every day - to people who deserve it - and some who are just good folk caught up in a bad situation.

While people in that latter category may see the charges against them dropped, they’ll still have a memento of their night in jail: a mugshot automatically published on the internet for the entire world to see.

ProPublica and Cotton Bureau

This is not breaking news. President Donald Trump hates the news media.

Even his top aides are keeping the heat on. Advisor Kellyanne Conway is suggesting that media organizations start firing some journalists for what she calls dishonest and embarrassing work.

Pixabay

As of today, there’s a new President of the United States. And the new Commander in Chief’s already testy relationship with the news media means it’s pretty clear that the press will never be the same.

City of St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman gave his annual State of the City address over the weekend, addressing challenges including the release of more than 100 million gallons of sewage into Tampa Bay and onto the city's streets this past summer.

Flickr

The hottest gadget this holiday season is getting attention it may not want.

Amazon's Echo is a voice- activated smart speaker that in a soothing – yet somewhat robotic way - plays music, shares the news and weather and answers even the most inane questions when anyone near the device says a key word - usually the name 'Alexa.'

Twitter

When news broke a few days ago about the assassination of the Russian Ambassador to Turkey at photo exhibit in Ankara, a handful of journalists who happened to be there captured the shooting with graphic photos and video.

And within hours, images of that shooting were leading newscasts and filling social media feeds around the world.

Pixabay

There’s an interesting term popping up in media reports lately: dog whistle.

It's a metaphor for talking in a way that a small group of people hear one that is hidden below the surface message, said Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.

New words and phrases are forever showing up in our conversations – and in our media. And when it comes to politics, the word choice journalists make can be overly generalized, polarizing or just plain wrong.

Albuminarium

If you've been paying attention lately, there's been a lot of talk about how many media organizations relied a little too much on flawed polling and survey data in predicting outcomes.

With that in mind, we're still going to throw caution to the wind and look at some new data that helps break down how Americans seem so divided.

We’re nearing Election Day, and millions of Florida residents are still contemplating who they will select to represent them in Tallahassee and local offices.

Most of the attention this campaign season has focused on the important presidential race, and some voters may still be wondering about the candidates for school board and state legislative races.

Mary Shedden / WUSF News

This time of year, towns across the country are celebrating autumn, hosting outdoor festivals where firefighters are selling barbecue, bands play danceable tunes from the '70s and '80s and local vendors hawk jewelry, T-shirts and artwork.

In Pass-A-Grille Beach, the southernmost spot along the Pinellas County coast, its "Party Under the Lights" event is a few degrees warmer than fall festivals up north.

Flickr

Thinking of memorializing your vote for the upcoming presidential election? You might want to think twice about that.

Florida is one of 18 states where it's illegal to take a selfie with your mail-in ballot or while you're in the voting booth.

Daylina Miller/WUSF / WUSF Public Media

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign may consider Hillary Clinton to be public enemy number one. But the media – and the reporters covering the GOP candidate – are close behind. Take for example, his description of journalists just a few days ago in Tampa.  

“These people are among the most dishonest in the world – the media,” Trump said to a roaring crowd. “They are the worst. They’re trying to fix the election for crooked Hillary.”

Daylina Miller/WUSF

Presidential nominee Donald Trump brought some surprise guests to his rally in Tampa Monday night – including legendary college football coach Bobby Bowden and the return of Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

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