Mark Schreiner

Reporter/Producer, University Beat

Mark Schreiner has been the producer and reporter for "University Beat" on WUSF 89.7 FM since 2001 and on WUSF TV since 2007.

He has worked as an anchor, reporter and producer at radio stations in Tampa and his native Chicago since 1992.

Pages

University Beat
3:24 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

USF Student, Palestinians Share the Healing Power of Dance

Dancers from Sareyyet Ramallah perform "Barriers," a piece that highlights the differences
Dwight Scheuneman

University Beat report on USF St. Petersburg student Dwayne Scheuneman's visit to the West Bank to teach dance to disabled and able-bodied Palestinian teachers and students.

In times of strife, people try to find comfort any way they can—and sometimes, it's in art.

The power of dance was on display for a group of Palestinians in the West Bank recently, and they had a University of South Florida St. Petersburg student to thank for that.

Dwayne Scheuneman, 45, is a senior studying education. The retired U.S. Navy veteran was left a paraplegic after suffering a spinal cord injury in a diving accident almost two decades ago.

Read more
Business
5:42 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Florida Tourism Posts Largest Second Quarter Ever

Florida had a record number of visitors during this past spring.

Gov. Rick Scott announced Tuesday that 24 million tourists visited the state during the second quarter of 2014.

That's a three percent jump over the same time period a year ago, and the largest second quarter ever for the state.

Read more
Law & Order
6:29 am
Mon August 11, 2014

Giving Dozier Victims Their Names Back

A poster with a picture of a young George Owen Smith playing the harmonica.
Mark Schreiner WUSF 89.7 News

Ovell Krell was only 12 years old when her brother died -- but what she remembers most about him was his musical ability.

"He could walk into a music store and pick up any instrument they've ever made and within two minutes, he could play it," she said.

Mark Schreiner's report on USF anthropologists' efforts to identify the remains of students buried on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys.

George Owen Smith, 14, tried to teach his sister how to play music, but those lessons stopped in 1940 when he was sentenced to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys after being caught in a stolen car with a 19-year-old friend.

Shortly after arriving at the reform school in Marianna, Fla., Smith reportedly escaped, but was found dead several months later under a house two miles away.

"Though the family told authorities to hold his remains at a local funeral, as they made their way on the long journey from Auburndale in a borrowed car, they arrived to be shown a mound of dirt by a superintendent who said that they had just buried him in an unmarked burial ground," according to University of South Florida associate professor of anthropology Erin Kimmerle.

That superintendent promised that a name plaque would be placed on Smith's grave -- a promise that was never met. Because of the mysterious circumstances of his death and the nature of his burial, Smith's mother refused to believe her son was indeed dead. That led Krell to make her parents a promise.

"I was searching for him, not only out of my love, but for a vow that I had made my mother and father on their deathbeds that I would find my brother if it was in my power, I would look till I died," Krell said.

Now, Krell has found her answer, thanks to a team of USF researchers.

Read more
University Beat
11:24 am
Fri August 8, 2014

USF Plans for Summer Commencement

USF Tampa held graduation ceremonies at the USF Sun Dome in May 2014. A similar crowd is expected at a pair of ceremonies Saturday.
Credit GradImages

Almost 2,800 students at the University of South Florida will wrap up the summer semester the best way possible Saturday - by graduating!

Over 1,600 of the students are expected to receive their diplomas during USF's 103rd Commencement Convocation. According to the university, a pair of ceremonies will be held at the USF Sun Dome on the Tampa campus.

9:00 a.m. ceremony will recognize graduates from:

Read more
University Beat
8:14 am
Fri August 8, 2014

First of Boys Buried at Dozier Identified

Pool/Edmund D. Fountain Tampa Bay Times

  It's taken University of South Florida researchers more than three years to provide one family with an answer they've been looking for, for more than 70 years.

The researchers uncovered remains from 55 unmarked graves on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna last year.  DNA testing has identified one set as belonging to George Owen Smith, who's believed to have died at age 14 -- shortly after being sent to the Florida Panhandle school in 1940.

USF Anthropologist Christian Wells says Smith was the first body found, but was in the worst shape.

Read more
Culture
12:37 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Jazz Pianist Kenny Drew Jr. Passes Away

Kenny Drew Jr., a jazz pianist who lived in the Bay Area, died this past Sunday at the age of 56.
Credit AllAboutJazz.com

Kenny Drew Jr., a Bay Area pianist and composer known to jazz audiences around the world, died this past Sunday. WUSF 89.7 Jazz Director Bob Seymour shares this remembrance:

He was immensely talented and had a piano sound identifiable within just a few notes. Kenny Drew Jr., the son of a major jazz piano player, was taught largely by his aunt, and that early classical training was apparent in the virtuosity that was always a big part of his sound.

Read more
University Beat
8:00 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Tales from the Border: USF Professor Visits Texas & Mexico

Migrants ride trains known as "La Bestia," or "the Beast," through Mexico to reach the U.S. border.
Credit John Moore / Getty Images/courtesy NPR

If things had gone as planned, USF Department of Anthropology Associate Professor Heide Castañeda would have spent the last two months in Texas and Mexico on a pair of research projects. She was going to talk to "mixed status" families on both sides of the border - families who have both legal and undocumented immigrants living in the United States - as well as meet with immigrants returning to Mexico.

Instead, she arrived just as the world's attention turned to the increasing number of Central American migrants fleeing their homes for what they thought was the promised land of the U.S.

Castañeda talked to University Beat on WUSF 89.7 about her visits to Sinaloa, Mexico, and McAllen, Texas, and what she saw there.

An extended University Beat interview with USF Department of Anthropology Assoc. Professor Heide Castañeda on her trip to Mexico & Texas and the Central American immigrants she encountered there.

Here are some highlights from that interview:

Read more
University Beat
1:58 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Florida Colleges Make Princeton Review Rankings

The Princeton Review's new book, The Best 379 Colleges: 2015 Edition, ranks schools in 62 different categories.
Credit Random House

Alcohol is apparently pretty popular at the University of Florida, students at New College are active in politics but not so much in sports, and studying isn't necessarily a priority at some Florida universities.

Those are just some of the conclusions that one might draw looking over the Princeton Review's new book, The Best 379 Colleges: 2015 edition.

Schools are ranked in 62 categories, ranging from best financial aid and best party school to colleges with the worst libraries and least politically active students. The rankings are based on surveys of 130,000 students at the 379 schools (read more about the rankings here).

While the University of South Florida didn't place in the top 20 of any of those categories, its overall performance was enough to make Princeton Review's list of the Best 379 Colleges.

Four Florida schools posted second place finishes in a variety of categories, the best performances of state schools.

Read more
Law & Order
2:39 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Girl Hit By Plane on Beach Dies

Ommy and Oceana Irizarry were killed when a plane made a crash landing on a Sarasota-area beach this past Sunday.
Credit Family photo / All Children's Hospital

A 9-year-old girl who was struck by a plane that crash-landed on a Gulf Coast beach near Sarasota while she vacationed with her family has died from her injuries, law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

Oceana Irizzary's father also was killed Sunday. The two, from Georgia, were walking along a beach in Venice on Sunday afternoon when the 1972 Piper Cherokee plane made an emergency landing after reporting problems.

Read more
University Beat
9:45 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Meet the New Boss of USF Health

Dr. Charles Lockwood, the USF Health Senior Vice President and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine, shared a number of thoughts with WUSF's University Beat.
Credit USF Health

Since becoming the new senior vice president for USF Health and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine in early May, Dr. Charles Lockwood has sat down with every department he oversees at the University of South Florida.

The former Dean of the Ohio State University's College of Medicine is plotting a course for one of USF's flagship divisions as he takes over from Dr. Stephen Klasko, who led USF Health for nine years before leaving last June to become the president of Thomas Jefferson University and president/CEO of the Jefferson University Hospital System.

WUSF's Mark Schreiner talks with USF Health Sr. VP Dr. Charles Lockwood in this extended University Beat.

Read more
StoryCorps Tampa Bay
7:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

StoryCorps Tampa Bay: The Feeling of Liberty

Pedro Martinez (center) with his daughters Natalia and Elvia.
Credit StoryCorps

In 1980, the Cuban government opened its doors, allowing people to leave the country in a mass exodus that would come to be known as the Mariel Boatlift. The country's economy had suffered a serious downturn, and political unrest and mass incarceration was making aspects of governance untenable.

The first wave of emigrants came when the Peruvian embassy allowed Cubans to exit under its banner.

Read more
StoryCorps Tampa Bay
8:00 am
Mon July 21, 2014

StoryCorps Tampa Bay: Two Siblings, Two Schools, Two Stories

Lolita and Lou Brown
Credit StoryCorps

Lou and Lolita Brown are brother and sister, born about eight years apart - just a big enough separation to give them very different life experiences.

Read more
University Beat
4:02 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

USF Special Collections Shows Off 'Favorite Things'

1 of only 2 wooden scale models of a sculpture Picasso was going to create for the USF Tampa campus in the 1970s. The model will be on display at a USF Tampa Library Special Collections event Thursday.
Credit Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

They're not raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, but the staff of USF Tampa Library's Special Collections is putting a few of their favorite things on display for the public for one day only.

According to Special Collections' librarian Andy Huse, the event, A Few of Our Favorite Things (Thursday, July 17 from 1-3 p.m.), allows he and his colleagues on the library's fourth floor to show off some of the most interesting objects, ranging from centuries-old spiritual texts and rare maps to Babylonian clay tablets and Victorian-era novels.

WUSF's Mark Schreiner talks to Andy Huse about the USF Tampa Library Special Collections' "A Few of Our Favorite Things" event Thursday.

Read more
4:49 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Selig: Rays Can Make Succeed - With New Stadium

Lead in text: 
Speaking shortly before the final All-Star Game he'll oversee as Major League Baseball commissioner, Bud Selig again said Tuesday that the Tampa Bay Rays need a new ballpark. TBO.com reports Selig said he'll leave any decisions on if and where a new stadium would be built up to Rays owner Stuart Sternberg.
Outgoing baseball commissioner Bud Selig said the Tampa Bay area has the demographics to succeed as a major-league market but reiterated the Rays' need for a new ballpark. However, after years of vocal disappointment from his office over low attendance and the need to replace Tropicana Field, Selig remarked Tuesday that he was leaving the stadium situation in the hands of Rays owner Stuart Sternberg.
Read More: http://tbo.com
University Beat
4:25 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

1Apple Grocery an Oasis in a 'Food Desert'

1Apple offers what co-founder Hector Angus calls "fresh fast food" -- organic fruits and vegetables direct from local farmers' markets.
Credit Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

This week's University Beat radio report on 1Apple Grocery.

You know the saying about an apple a day keeping the doctor away. Now two USF students are hoping that “one apple” might help keep an entire neighborhood healthy.

Hector Angus and Andrea Little have opened 1Apple Grocery in Plant City, in part to provide relief in a so-called “food desert.”

"A food desert is an area where the residents don’t have access to fresh fruits, or nutritious foods," said Angus, who's pursuing his bachelor's degree in information technology with a minor in business.

"So that’s one of the problems that we’re trying to tackle with 1Apple is being able to provide the fresh produce for the families," added Little, who just completed her third year of medical school.

Read more

Pages