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Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Florida is a boating state, with its miles of beaches, rivers, and local fishing spots. Tragedies appear to be on the rise and state lawmakers are looking for ways to make boating safer.

The Seminole tribe of Florida says it’s making progress in negotiations to extend part of a gambling agreement with the state. But the tribe is also moving forward with a lawsuit.

Florida Senate staff are using a random computer system to decide which Senators will have to run for re-election next year or get more time to stay in office.

Florida lawmakers are bracing for budget holes despite figures showing the state could end up with another year of surplus.  The cost driver: healthcare.

Healthcare concerns, more specifically cost problems—are starting to take over conversations at the capital.

A Conservative Florida group wants Governor Rick Scott to de-fund the state’s planned parenthood clinics. Florida Family Policy Council President John Stemberger says Governor Rick Scott isn’t a true conservative if he allows state dollars to continue flowing to planned parenthood.

Florida’s Board of Education wants to set a high bar for student performance in the state’s new standardized test, and it's calling for  higher cut scores beyond what a review committee has recommended.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce says Florida’s lawsuit climate is among the worst in the nation—for businesses. The business lobby association is pushing state legislators to crack down on trial lawyers—including one big name in the industry.

Florida Blue is introducing hybrid plans into Florida’s Affordable Care Act marketplace. They  could give consumers both more and fewer choices in providers.

Florida’s Medicaid costs will soon take up about half of the state’s new revenue. And enrollment in the program continues to grow. The increasing costs of the program has the state’s chief economist putting part of the blame on prescription drugs.

Florida’s health insurance market for next year is beginning to take shape, and there will be cost increases. But  that’s not what’s raising eyebrows. In Florida, managed care health plans will dominate the market place, and the emergence of a new system  has some wondering, what is an EPO?

A revamped health care agenda is starting to take shape ahead of next year’s lawmaking session. Last regular session The Florida House and Senate clashed over whether to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

  Update: The former Virginia journalist who killed two of his former co-workers, is dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.  WDBJ7-TV general manager Jeffrey Marks described Bryce Williams as a disgruntled employee who displayed "anger issues".

Florida’s state-based insurance exchange is gearing up for open enrollment later this year. Florida Health Choices is reaching out to professionals licensed by the state, as well as realtors, to grow its numbers.

A starting point for new Florida Congressional districts has been revealed and it’s setting off a firestorm among incumbents, and future candidates.  As state lawmakers prepare to draw the districts for a third time, the fourth lawsuit over the process has been launched.

Florida’s top healthcare official says her agency was right to cite state planned parenthood clinics for violating abortion rules. But Planned Parenthood Florida maintains it did nothing wrong.

Florida officials are asking the Seminole Tribe when it plans to end card games at its casinos and the tribe has responded—with a request for mediation.

A non-partisan organization wants to change the way Florida’s elected officials are chosen. They’re tired of partisanship and say the best way to address it is to make candidates appeal to a broader electorate. That means tapping in to the state’s nearly 2.9 million No Party Affiliated voters, who are largely locked out of state primaries.

Update 7/24/15:   More information on Florida rates under the Affordable Care Act. The Florida Office of Insurance Regulation hasn't released information on more than 12 other health insurers. According to its website, "displayed rate changes may not fully reflect increases and decreases due to claims of trade secret." There are several companies that have posted requests but they are blocked. OIR handles all proposals, but those over 10 percent are posted to CMS. The state has blocked the requests from insurers who have requested rate increases under 10 percent of which several are pending.

Results for the 10th grade English-Language Arts Florida Standards Assessment, are in. And students performed largely the same as they did under the old FCAT exam. As the FSA undergoes an evaluation to see if it’s a valid measure of student ability, the state is using it to determine students graduate from high school.

The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide whether health insurance subsidies for millions of Americans in 34 states, are legal. And if the high court says they aren’t, 1.3 million Floridians could lose their health insurance, or end up paying far more for it.

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