Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Republican members of Florida’s Congressional Delegations have found themselves confronting angry constituents at recent town hall meetings. The move is part of a backlash from Democrats over the Presidential election. But how long will that anger last?

A controversial teacher bonus program could be up for changes this year. Teachers have complained the Best and Brightest program is unfair—it awards bonuses partly based on standardized test scores—disadvantaging older and minority educators.

A Senate plan for changes to the state’s public colleges and universities sailed smoothly through its first panel hearing Monday. Questions mostly centered on how schools could implement block tuition and use a four-year graduation rate as part of the state’s higher ed accountability system.

The future could get a little brighter for some Florida college students. There’s a growing consensus to increase awards for some of the state’s highest academic performers. Legislative and state leaders seem to be in agreement when it comes to lowering the cost of higher ed.

When Florida lawmakers new and old arrive for the annual lawmaking session they’ll be faced with a $25 billion issue: Medicaid. The state’s health insurance program for low-income Floridians just keeps getting bigger, despite continued efforts to control costs.

Governor Rick Scott is not concerned about a potential presidential recount in Florida. 

As a presidential recount continues in Wisconsin there’s an independent push for an election review in Florida. Donald Trump won Florida by more than 100,00 votes.

Florida’s higher education coordinating council wants to see more working age Floridians with certifications and degrees.

Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran is gearing up for a fight with lobbyists, unions, and maybe even his own colleagues. Corcoran used his swearing in ceremony to go after the Florida Education Association's challenge to the state's de-facto school voucher program.

Nursing homes are gearing up to fight a plan that could result in what they say are widely varied Medicaid reimbursement rates. Its part of a legislative push for efficiency, but the move is worrying providers in the $4.8 billion program.

Nearly two dozen Florida businesses and healthcare groups have signed on to a national campaign to control prescription drug costs.  The effort has been buoyed recently by reports of astronomically high prices for every-day medications like Epi Pens.

It’s no secret that longtime Florida Republican strategist Mac Stipanovich doesn’t like Donald Trump. This week he became the latest Florida GOP official to publicly back Democrat Hilary Clinton for President. Stipanovich shares his thoughts on the state of the Grand Old Party, and where it goes after this election.

The Florida Supreme Court will take up several cases that could reshape gambling, the death penalty and open carry laws in the state.  Justices will hear oral arguments this week, starting Tuesday.

Transportation apps like Uber and Lyft will continue to face local regulations. The Florida legislature couldn’t reach a deal on how to regulate the industry statewide.

Florida lawmakers seem ready to give some terminally ill Floridians access to medical marijuana. But some medical marijuana expansion supporters are already setting their sights on November.

The Florida House has approved several education bills changing everything from the way students can transfer to how how quickly they can advance in school. But some of those proposals face opposition in the Senate when they get there.

A Florida Senate health panel has killed a bill granting a new exemption to state hospital licensure rules.

In the run-up to Tuesday’s meeting, some questioned surrounded whether Florida Surgeon General John Armstrong would be confirmed. Armstrong’s been under fire for decreasing enrollment in the Children's Medical Services program, rising HIV infections and staff cuts in local health departments.  The Senate Health Policy Committee narrowly confirmed him on a 5-to-4 vote.

Florida’s Agency for Healthcare Administrations has cited the Calhoun-Liberty County Hospital with 10 deficiencies in an audit following the death of a Blountstown woman.

One Florida lawmaker's effort to provide clear guidance for end-of-life care turned into a conversation on death, and euthanasia. Republican Senator Jeff Brandes’ bill would lead to the creation of a portable form patients and their doctors fill out to make sure the patients' wishes are followed.

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