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Julio Ochoa

Health News Florida Editor

Julio Ochoa is editor of Health News Florida.

He comes to WUSF from The Tampa Tribune, where he began as a website producer for TBO.com and served in several editing roles, eventually becoming the newspaper’s deputy metro editor. 

Julio was born and raised in St. Petersburg, and received a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University. He earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado and worked at a paper in Greeley, Colo., before returning to Florida as a reporter and as breaking news editor for the Naples Daily News.

Contact Julio at 813-974-8633, on Twitter at @julioochoa or email julioochoa@wusf.org.

The University of South Florida has formed a partnership with a network of hospitals to train more doctors in the Tampa Bay area.

Transportation Security Administration

As travelers head to airports during the busy holiday week, airport security officials have a message: Don’t try to bring your guns on the plane.

Tampa Police Department

Florida Highway Patrol troopers are helping to police Seminole Heights after four people were recently shot to death in the Tampa neighborhood.

Obamacare enrollment is off to a strong start in Florida and around the nation, according to national data and those who help people sign up for health insurance.

Editor's note: This story has been updated with the correct number of Medicaid patients covered by the Harvoni treatment over the past two years.

Dr. Ronald Cirillo and his assistant at the Turning Points free clinic in Bradenton are testing another patient for hepatitis C.

Julio Ochoa/WUSF

A day after the fourth slaying in Tampa's Seminole Heights neighborhood, police released new video of someone they are now calling a suspect.

When patients come to The Outreach Clinic in Brandon, one of the first people they encounter is Jackie Perez.

Florida’s largest provider of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act responded today to the federal government’s decision to stop funding subsidies that keep costs low for some consumers.

Caribbean American Civic Movement

Groups in the Tampa Bay area are mounting humanitarian missions to Puerto Rico and holding fundraisers for victims following Hurricanes Maria and Irma.

Florida Hospital has purchased about 100 acres along Interstate 4 in Lakeland where it plans to build a freestanding emergency room and eventually a 200-bed hospital.

The C130's four propeller engines scream as it lifts off from MacDill Air Force base in Tampa.

The plane is loaded with pallets of medical supplies bound for St. Croix, nine days after the largest of the U.S. Virgin Islands took a direct hit from Hurricane Maria.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

Humanitarian flights to the islands of St. Croix and Puerto Rico are continuing in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Crews based at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa on Friday loaded a cargo plane with supplies and headed for St. Croix, where patients from island hospitals were picked up and taken to a Columbia, South Carolina hospital

Health insurance rates on the Obamacare marketplace in Florida will increase by an average of 45 percent in 2018.

A proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act would cost Florida $9.7 billion in federal funding over six years, according to a study from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Recent efforts in Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare are overshadowing an important deadline to fund children's health insurance.

UF Health

Researchers at the University of Florida have developed a new therapy that they hope could lead to a cure for multiple sclerosis.

A mild stroke sent St. Petersburg resident Lori Ngo to the hospital in May.

She was feeling a pain in her leg, but didn't think much of it.

A Florida organization that helps people sign up for insurance through the federal marketplace will have its funding cut by nearly $1 million.

For the millions of people who are still without power across Florida, heat illness can be a concern.  

Daylina Miller/WUSF

More than 1.4 million customers in the Tampa Bay area were still without power as of 3 p.m. Monday, according to the Florida Division of Emergency Management.

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