Julio Ochoa

Health News Florida Editor

Julio Ochoa is editor of Health News Florida.

He comes to WUSF from The Tampa Tribune, where he began as a website producer for and served in several editing roles, eventually becoming the newspaper’s deputy metro editor. 

Julio was born and raised in St. Petersburg, and received a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University. He earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado and worked at a paper in Greeley, Colo., before returning to Florida as a reporter and as breaking news editor for the Naples Daily News.

Contact Julio at 813-974-8633, on Twitter at @julioochoa or email

Florida Department of Transportation

The same company that designed a pedestrian bridge that collapsed in Miami also designed the Sunshine Skyway Bridge and the elevated portion of the Selmon Expressway in Tampa.

Southeastern Grocers

Southeastern Grocers announced plans to close 94 stores, including 10 Winn-Dixie stores in the Tampa Bay area.

A bill approved by the Florida Legislature would end HCA’s bid to open a trauma center at Northside Hospital in St. Petersburg.

A program that helps thousands of Florida seniors sign up for Medicare could lose all of its funding by the end of the month if Congress doesn't act.

Florida legislators passed a bill this week that would make first responders eligible for workers compensation if they are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

The high school shooting in Parkland is sparking a lot of questions from children who are wondering if something similar could happen at their school.

After the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida leaders are considering pouring more money into mental health care and experts in the field released some suggestions on Thursday.

Inside the kitchen at Bethel Community Baptist Church Boyzell Hosey and Samantha Wilson are battling for bragging rights.

Tobacco settlement money used to prevent people from smoking has been extremely successful.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently hosted a town hall event in St. Petersburg about providing health care to the uninsured. We'll hear highlights from the panel discussion and questions from the audience on this week's episode.

Some cities, counties and school districts in Florida and around the country are helping their employees buy cheap prescription drugs from Canada and overseas.

The flu has forced one school in Pinellas County to close and others in the Tampa Bay area to send warnings home to parents.

Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

What’s The Solution? Delivering Health Care To Uninsured Floridians

For the past six months Health News Florida has told the stories of people without insurance who use free clinics throughout the Tampa Bay area. Now we’re inviting the community to take part in that conversation during a special taping of Florida Matters. Join us for a panel discussion on providing care to the uninsured.

Donald Trump came into office promising to repeal Obamacare and replace it with something more affordable that would cover everyone. But members of congress couldn't agree on what that should be.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

A new partnership will allow sheriffs from around the state to legally hold undocumented criminals for up to 48 hours so they can be deported.

The state is disputing a report that found funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program in Florida will run out in February if Congress doesn't act.

The Agape Food Bank in Winter Haven shut its doors at the end of December.

But some charities believe the change may actually benefit those in need of food assistance in Polk County.

More than 700,000 Floridians selected or were automatically re-enrolled in Obamacare plans during the final week of regular enrollment, bringing the state’s six-week enrollment total to 1.73 million.

Floridians have until December 31st to sign up for a health insurance plan through Obamacare, thanks to Hurricane Irma.

During a routine visit at the St. Petersburg Free Clinic, Dr. Ajoy Kumar was going over blood test results with a 46-year-old patient named Paul.