LISTEN LIVE

Jessica Palombo

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x364

Jessica Palombo got her master’s degree in broadcast and digital journalism from the S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. While interning at WAER News in Syracuse, she was awarded the Syracuse Press Club’s top prize for a radio feature story produced by a student. She interned at WAMU News and NPR's "Weekends at All Things Considered," both in Washington, D.C., before moving back to her home state of Florida. She then freelanced at WJCT News in Jacksonville before joining the staff of WFSU News full time. Before getting into radio, she was an editor, reporter and essayist for The Gainesville Sun, Skirt! Magazine and Jacksonville Magazine. When she's not reporting, Jessica enjoys acting in plays and films, cooking vegan food and discovering new music.  Follow Jessica Palombo on Twitter: @JessicaPubRadio.

Chances are, most people hadn’t heard of compounding pharmacies until a deadly national meningitis outbreak last year was traced back to one such facility in Massachusetts. Following a federal crackdown, Florida lawmakers took steps today toward imposing additional restrictions on compounding pharmacies that ship medicine into the Sunshine State.

Businesses could see their electricity taxes cut in half under a proposal Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Adam Putnam is pushing. The commissioner’s plan would also dedicate the remaining tax revenue to education.

Gov. Rick Scott has proposed cutting vehicle registration fees as part of his election year plan to save voters $500 million in taxes. On Wednesday, Putnam offered his alternative: Slash businesses’ electricity levy by 50 percent and spend the rest of the electricity taxes on schools.

A federal judge has sided with the state and federal governments by saying Florida should set pollution standards for its waterways. Environmental groups are considering an appeal of the ruling letting Florida manage its own water.

This week’s ruling is the latest in a lawsuit the environmental groups brought six years ago saying the state didn’t comply with the federal Clean Water Act. Federal judge Robert Hinkle agreed with state and federal assertions that Florida should set its own acceptable pollution standards.

Central Florida planners are grappling with a challenge: There’s not enough water for the people expected to live in the area 20 years from now. That realization has prompted unprecedented collaboration between local governments, private utilities and state agencies as they search for more water.

A bipartisan group of Florida lawmakers has filed a raft of bills for the 2014 legislative session aimed at keeping children safe from sex offenders. The bills would beef up the sentencing and monitoring of sexual predators.

Senate President Don Gaetz calls the package of bills this year’s “centerpiece” and says he looks forward to sending it to Gov. Scott early in the session. 

Sen. Rob Bradley (R-Orange Park) is sponsoring a bill that would lengthen criminal sentences and monitoring of predators.

Pages