LISTEN LIVE

Jessica Palombo

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x364

Jessica Palombo got her master’s degree in broadcast and digital journalism from the S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. While interning at WAER News in Syracuse, she was awarded the Syracuse Press Club’s top prize for a radio feature story produced by a student. She interned at WAMU News and NPR's "Weekends at All Things Considered," both in Washington, D.C., before moving back to her home state of Florida. She then freelanced at WJCT News in Jacksonville before joining the staff of WFSU News full time. Before getting into radio, she was an editor, reporter and essayist for The Gainesville Sun, Skirt! Magazine and Jacksonville Magazine. When she's not reporting, Jessica enjoys acting in plays and films, cooking vegan food and discovering new music.  Follow Jessica Palombo on Twitter: @JessicaPubRadio.

This story first aired as part of the "After Hurricane Irma" special produced by Florida Public Radio at WLRN. 

Updated 12:05 p.m. Saturday: 

Two Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office police officers are expected to recover after they were shot while responding to a call Friday night.  What started as a domestic incident also left a man dead after the shootout with police.

Ride-for-hire services like Lyft and Uber will have to comply with statewide rules, and religious expression at public schools will be explicitly protected in Florida, under new laws that go into effect Sat., July 1.

The changes are among 125 revisions the state Legislature passed and Gov. Rick Scott approved this year.

Jessica Palombo / WJCT

In October of 2005, Orange County Sheriff’s Deputy Adam Pierce was patrolling part of Orlando’s Orange Blossom Trail.

“It was a high crime, high drug area,” he recalled.

At age 25, Pierce was already a six-year veteran of the force. He says he enjoyed the work.

One Monday, he caught a drug dealer in the act, and the suspect tried to flee. Another deputy shot the suspect with a Taser in the right arm.

Northeast Florida residents are getting confused by a flier that’s showing up in their mailboxes. 

The mailer from a national, Democratic-leaning group encourages people to register to vote. But county election supervisors say recipients aren’t always eligible voters. 

Jacksonville police are asking for help catching the men who they say stole a gun that was used to kill a police officer.

The Sheriff’s Office has released a video and photos of two men trying to open the door of a car in the Bartram Springs area last summer. The two are wanted in connection with burglaries of several cars parked on Wind Cave Avenue in the early morning hours of August 5.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has resigned from the board of a Jacksonville-based timber company. Bush appears to be preparing for a presidential run.

Florida Democrats have managed to narrow an early Republican lead in the number of ballots cast before Election Day. The numbers appear to favor Democratic gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist—at first glance. But  a state election-law change makes this election’s outcome harder to predict.

Six people who recently traveled from Ebola-affected regions are under twice-daily monitoring by the Florida Health Department. The state continues preparing in case someone tests positive.

No cases of Ebola have been confirmed in Florida, and all six of the people being monitored are considered low-risk. Gov. Rick Scott says just under 100 hospitals have completed special Ebola training, and he hopes more will do so.

Note: Every day this week, we’ll be taking a look at amendments on the Florida ballot.

We start with Amendment 1: the measure setting aside public money for environmental conservation. Supporters of the amendment say it’s a way to accomplish what the Legislature has failed to do. But opponents say the Constitution isn’t the place to write state budgets.

Florida State University student groups are hoping to get the state Board of Governors to block the presidential confirmation of state Sen. John Thrasher (R-St. Augustine). The groups and several faculty members have protested at every step of the search process this year, at one point leading to the resignation of the school’s original search consultant.

Blocks away from the Florida Capitol today, a group targeting climate-change deniers kicked off what it’s calling “Rick Scott’s Ark Tour.” The NextGen Climate Action Committee has spent more than $3.6 million so far in an attempt to inject climate change as an issue in the Florida governor’s race, according to finance records filed with the state.

Noah’s ark, or what looks just like it, was parked at a meter on a busy Tallahassee street. During the lunch-hour rush  here, about two dozen college students were waving signs and handing out T-shirts to passing drivers.

This morning, Florida officials recognized the 16th annual Missing Children’s Day at the state Capitol. Last year, Florida law enforcement officers received more than 35,000 missing-child reports.

Update, 10 p.m. 8/26/14:

With some precincts yet to report, Detzner says he believes more voters cast ballots early and absentee than on Election Day. However, the high percentage of voters taking advantage of alternative voting methods didn't contribute to high overall turnout. In fact, Detzner said he predicts fewer people participated in this midterm primary than in 2010, when 22 percent of registered voters cast ballots. 

Original post below:

A Florida community with the highest concentration of Greek people in the country has been recognized as a Traditional Cultural Property by the National Park Service. Locals hope the designation for the Tarpon Springs Greektown Historic District brings tourists to the area.

At a Department of Health workshop in Tallahassee today, hopeful marijuana growers, lobbyists and others voiced concerns about Florida’s proposed rules governing medical cannabis. By the beginning of next year, the state can select up to five growers authorized to supply non-high-inducing marijuana under the so-called “Charlotte’s Web” law.

A Florida district court has denied a pregnant minor’s appeal to avoid notifying her parents she planned to have an abortion. The ruling stems from a 2004 state constitutional amendment requiring parents to be notified before teenage daughters terminate pregnancies.

Last month’s campaign fundraising totals show Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Charlie Crist has strong backing from Florida chiropractors.

 In April alone, individual chiropractors contributed at least $112,000 to Crist’s campaign - roughly 12 percent of his fundraising haul for the month.

The Orlando-area SunRail commuter train has gotten more than twice the anticipated number of daily riders since it opened on Thursday. Transportation officials say the demand is expected to slacken once they start charging for rides later this month.

Florida Department of Transportation spokesman Steve Olson says SunRail started with a bang.

“This is history that occurred here in Central Florida," he says. 

Even with dozens of bills left on the agenda, the Florida Senate on Monday devoted hours to honoring outgoing Senate President Don Gaetz. Gaetz reflected on the chamber’s proudest accomplishments since he took the helm last year.

Before an audience of senators, lobbyists, reporters and family members, Gaetz took his spot at the Senate lectern for what will be one of the last times.

“I’ve made a thousand mistakes, and I ask your forgiveness for any slight or any offense,” he said at one point in the speech.

Pages