Daylina Miller

Reporter

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, joined WUSF Public Media in early 2015 to help expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University and through the program started Dames & Dice, a tabletop gaming blog.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

Before speaking at a town hall Wednesday night on race relations, Andrew Joseph quietly placed airbrushed signs around the room.

The signs read "Black Lives Matter" and "We need Change." Some had pictures of his son, Andrew Joseph III.

The teenager died crossing Interstate 4 last year after being ejected from the Florida State Fair.

A prescription drug that counters the effects of a pain medication overdose could soon be available to caregivers and others.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

The University of South Florida announced late Friday afternoon that the USF Forensic Anthropology Laboratory will find an alternate location to train students and law enforcement to process human remains in outdoor crime scenes.

The Facility for Outdoor Experimental Research and Training (FORT) program was proposed on Hillsborough County Sheriffs property in Lithia, but an outcry from residents about possible smells, groundwater contamination and property values prompted a change in plans.

A database that tracks oxycodone and other controlled substances in Florida is being credited with a 25 percent drop in overdose deaths.

In 2011, the state created the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program so doctors and pharmacists could see if patients were doctor shopping, or getting care from multiple doctors without their awareness,  for prescription drugs.

Thousands of Florida children will retain their health care coverage for at least another two years thanks to the passage of the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act.

AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke

Ethical questions are being raised about the Tampa Bay Times' coverage of Don Hughes, the Ruskin man who flew a homemade gyrocopter onto the grounds of the Capitol.

The Times first reported on Hughes' flight close to the time he took to the air on Wednesday.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

    

Cuba is less than one hundred miles from the southernmost tip of Florida, but for years, travel to there has been restricted.

At a recent event called “Cuba Forum – Tampa at the Forefront of Historic Change,” business owners and community leaders who have lobbied for better relations with the country met with U.S. Commerce officials.

Three Tampa Bay counties improved their health score in this year’s annual County Health Rankings, released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

  Businesses in downtown Tampa now have a direct line to patrol officers assigned to the area thanks to an expansion of the Tampa Police Department’s “Business Watch" program. 

The program started in 2011 in Ybor City, where police say crime has been reduced 60 percent during the day and 50 percent at night.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

With visibly shaking hands, University of South Florida medical student Chris DeClue opened his envelope.

The sound of rustling paper echoed through the speakers.

“USF. Diagnostic radiology,” he said as the crowd erupted into cheers.

Friday was National Match Day and 128 USF students, the school’s largest ever medical class to celebrate,  gathered at Ulele, a restaurant near downtown Tampa, to find out where they're going to do their post-graduate medical training.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Hundreds of business women gathered Thursday at the Floridan Palace Hotel in downtown Tampa for a luncheon, guest speakers and special announcement.

The announcement was tucked inside a black, matte envelope and covered in orange, purple and pink chevron print with a quote from Harry Potter author, J.K. Rowling.

The  Florida Senate Health Policy Committee passed a bill Tuesday that will establish the "Florida Right to Try Act."

SB 1052 will allow patients diagnosed with a terminal illness to explore products and treatments that are currently under clinical trial, but not yet FDA approved. It also would protect a physician recommending certain treatment options.

A plan to provide health care coverage to 800,000 Floridians faces an uphill battle after unanimous approval by the Senate Health Policy Committee.

WUSF/Mark Schreiner

Gov. Rick Scott gave his State of the State address Tuesday and talked about issues that affect Floridians, like jobs and education.

Scott did not address medical marijuana, Medicare and Medicaid, reform of the state prison system or some other hot topics up for discussion in this year’s Legislative session.

After the address, WUSF's Carson Cooper talked with USF political science professor  John Bertalan about what the governor did - and didn't - address. 

Moffitt Cancer Center

When the NCAA Women's Final Four comes to town, cancer researchers benefit. 

Since 2009, the Kay Yow Cancer Fund has awarded a women's cancer research grant to a research institution in the city hosting the NCAA Women's Final Four

Monday, Moffitt Cancer Center Professor of Oncology and Medicine Dr. Martine Extermann received the $250,000 grant.

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