Daylina Miller

Reporter

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, joined WUSF Public Media in early 2015 to help expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University.

Ways to Connect

 When someone dies, a lot of people honor the memory of a loved one with a funeral.

Those who chose a traditional casket burial spend about $7,000 or more. A service that includes a cremation costs about a third of that.

But there’s a growing number of people who want to remember their loved ones long after the funeral ends in a different way.

Florida insurance regulators will start reviewing health plans for discriminatory practices after three insurers were accused of charging higher prices for HIV drugs.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

When Port Richey resident Dawn Cain and her girlfriend, Randi Jackson, first heard the news of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling last Friday that legalized gay marriage nationally, they cried.

While they had already planned to get married next May- Florida legalized gay marriage Jan. 6- the couple said they’re exhilarated their friends and family in other states now have the same right.

Saturday is National HIV Testing Day. In the lead up, groups across Florida are offering free tests for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

  Many Florida Department of Health offices are conducting simple blood tests for HIV and syphilis.

The Supreme Court, in King v. Burwell, will soon decide whether more than a million Floridians will lose subsidies they rely on to buy insurance on HealthCare.gov.  

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Across from the Central Hillsborough Water Treatment Facility in Brandon is a few acres of upturned dirt littered with the beginnings of a construction project that county officials hope will help them better handle natural disasters.

Daylina Miller/WUSF 89.7 News

At a coffee house in Tampa called "Sacred Grounds," more than 100 Doctor Who fans don costume pieces like fezzes, trenchcoats and sonic screwdrivers - an alien multipurpose tool that does just about anything BUT home repair.

They gather by the main stage. Some exchange nervous looks and laughter. The speed dating activity is about to start.

Hospital administrators and Democratic lawmakers are still trying to persuade Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida House on an alternative to Medicaid expansion.

A coalition called "A Healthy Florida Works" is urging the lawmakers to accept a revamped proposal from the Florida Senate. They met today at the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce.

A new report released by the U.S. Coast Guard says more Floridians are involved in boating accidents than anywhere else in the nation.

There were close to 700 accidents and 70 deaths on boats last year statewide.  

Jenna Pascoli stands in a small, glass-paneled room inside the The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Dental Medicine clinic in Bradenton and  pulls on a blue, paper medical gown over her scrubs.  

Daylina Miller/WUSF

Before speaking at a town hall Wednesday night on race relations, Andrew Joseph quietly placed airbrushed signs around the room.

The signs read "Black Lives Matter" and "We need Change." Some had pictures of his son, Andrew Joseph III.

The teenager died crossing Interstate 4 last year after being ejected from the Florida State Fair.

A prescription drug that counters the effects of a pain medication overdose could soon be available to caregivers and others.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

The University of South Florida announced late Friday afternoon that the USF Forensic Anthropology Laboratory will find an alternate location to train students and law enforcement to process human remains in outdoor crime scenes.

The Facility for Outdoor Experimental Research and Training (FORT) program was proposed on Hillsborough County Sheriffs property in Lithia, but an outcry from residents about possible smells, groundwater contamination and property values prompted a change in plans.

A database that tracks oxycodone and other controlled substances in Florida is being credited with a 25 percent drop in overdose deaths.

In 2011, the state created the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program so doctors and pharmacists could see if patients were doctor shopping, or getting care from multiple doctors without their awareness,  for prescription drugs.

Thousands of Florida children will retain their health care coverage for at least another two years thanks to the passage of the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act.

AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke

Ethical questions are being raised about the Tampa Bay Times' coverage of Don Hughes, the Ruskin man who flew a homemade gyrocopter onto the grounds of the Capitol.

The Times first reported on Hughes' flight close to the time he took to the air on Wednesday.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

    

Cuba is less than one hundred miles from the southernmost tip of Florida, but for years, travel to there has been restricted.

At a recent event called “Cuba Forum – Tampa at the Forefront of Historic Change,” business owners and community leaders who have lobbied for better relations with the country met with U.S. Commerce officials.

Three Tampa Bay counties improved their health score in this year’s annual County Health Rankings, released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

  Businesses in downtown Tampa now have a direct line to patrol officers assigned to the area thanks to an expansion of the Tampa Police Department’s “Business Watch" program. 

The program started in 2011 in Ybor City, where police say crime has been reduced 60 percent during the day and 50 percent at night.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

With visibly shaking hands, University of South Florida medical student Chris DeClue opened his envelope.

The sound of rustling paper echoed through the speakers.

“USF. Diagnostic radiology,” he said as the crowd erupted into cheers.

Friday was National Match Day and 128 USF students, the school’s largest ever medical class to celebrate,  gathered at Ulele, a restaurant near downtown Tampa, to find out where they're going to do their post-graduate medical training.

Pages