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Daylina Miller

Reporter

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, joined WUSF Public Media in early 2015 to help expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University.

Contact Daylina at 813-974-8629, on Twitter @DaylinaMiller or by email at daylinamiller@wusf.org

Ways to Connect

UPDATED 11/23 1:55 P.M.

A woman died Monday morning at Florida Hospital in Tampa after her stepfather shot her and then killed himself.

Not every American 65 and older is worrying about Medicare's open enrollment period, now underway. Some who are eligible for the government insurance plan are staying on the job, and gaining access to employer-based plans they say are a better option. 

Courtesy of USF Health

A international study published Monday suggests that children at risk for type 1 diabetes are less likely to develop the disease if they consume probiotics when they're infants.

A two-day summit aimed at continuing the fight against human trafficking in Florida kicked off Thursday morning at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Seniors enrolling in Medicare are facing a tough decision when it comes to which plans they should sign up for.

In 1996, at just 20-years-old, artist Mariam Paré was shot while driving a friend’s car in Chicago.

Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters (Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 25 at 7:30 a.m.), we’re exploring some of the many beaches around Tampa Bay, with a look at parking, water quality and recollections of beach days gone by.

Health care providers around Florida are continuing a push for laws that would expand the roles of nurse practitioners and physicians assistants.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Tampa's city council voted late Thursday night to move forward with a citizen police review board that will review internal affairs cases and police policies.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Tampa City Council members continue to oppose Mayor Bob Buckhorn over the creation of a Civilian Police Review Board.

Council members said the current proposal gives the mayor too much power.

Buckhorn called for an executive order, establishing a board of citizens that would independently investigate police conduct and give him the ability to appoint nine people to the 11-member board.

City council members asked to appoint seven people to the board, one citizen member for each city council member, while allowing Buckhorn to still appoint four members.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

New Port Richey officials have approved $666,097 to pay for road repairs after heavy rains caused massive flooding in West Pasco County.

Hillsborough County has confirmed its first case of West Nile Virus in a human this year.

Planned Parenthood advocates used Tuesday's appearance of the group's leader at a Congressional  hearing as a chance to show support for continued federal funding.

Most health insurance providers offer pricing tools for consumers.

But Floridians are skeptical of the information they see on these sites, the Governor's Commission on Healthcare and Hospital Funding learned Monday in Tampa.

  Florida's rural counties are seeing suicide rates for youth almost double that of the state's large cities. And experts say isolation, poverty, access to firearms and a lack of mental health resources are to blame.

Americans who buy health insurance through their employer are paying more for their monthly premiums, a new study shows.

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Federal officials on Thursday announced Thursday more than $5 million in grants to Florida agencies dealing with a backlog of thousands of untested sexual assault forensic exams, sometimes known as “rape kits.”

In an office decorated with signs proclaiming “Safe Space,” Peggy Saddler meets with students overwhelmed by classes, fighting with friends and family or struggling with deeper problems.

The Wauchula High School guidance counselor has worked with students in rural counties for more than 30 years and said sometimes students are “shutting the door every night (with) a little bit more than teenage angst.”

Daylina Miller/WUSF

The federal government has denied Gov. Rick Scott's request for “Individual Assistance” (IA) for Pasco County flood victims.

Scott requested the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) funds last month after hundreds of homes and dozens of businesses were damaged during nearly three weeks of rain.

Many of the residents affected are on fixed incomes.

Annette Doying, the Director of Emergency Management in Pasco County, explains what federal officials looked at to make their decision.

Seven Floridians organizations were awarded $9.95 million to help with the third year of enrollment on the federal marketplace.

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