Daylina Miller

Reporter

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, joined WUSF Public Media in early 2015 to help expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University.

Contact Daylina at 813-974-8629, on Twitter @DaylinaMiller or by email at daylinamiller@wusf.org

Ways to Connect

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

New Port Richey officials have approved $666,097 to pay for road repairs after heavy rains caused massive flooding in West Pasco County.

Hillsborough County has confirmed its first case of West Nile Virus in a human this year.

Planned Parenthood advocates used Tuesday's appearance of the group's leader at a Congressional  hearing as a chance to show support for continued federal funding.

Most health insurance providers offer pricing tools for consumers.

But Floridians are skeptical of the information they see on these sites, the Governor's Commission on Healthcare and Hospital Funding learned Monday in Tampa.

  Florida's rural counties are seeing suicide rates for youth almost double that of the state's large cities. And experts say isolation, poverty, access to firearms and a lack of mental health resources are to blame.

Americans who buy health insurance through their employer are paying more for their monthly premiums, a new study shows.

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Federal officials on Thursday announced Thursday more than $5 million in grants to Florida agencies dealing with a backlog of thousands of untested sexual assault forensic exams, sometimes known as “rape kits.”

In an office decorated with signs proclaiming “Safe Space,” Peggy Saddler meets with students overwhelmed by classes, fighting with friends and family or struggling with deeper problems.

The Wauchula High School guidance counselor has worked with students in rural counties for more than 30 years and said sometimes students are “shutting the door every night (with) a little bit more than teenage angst.”

Daylina Miller/WUSF

The federal government has denied Gov. Rick Scott's request for “Individual Assistance” (IA) for Pasco County flood victims.

Scott requested the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) funds last month after hundreds of homes and dozens of businesses were damaged during nearly three weeks of rain.

Many of the residents affected are on fixed incomes.

Annette Doying, the Director of Emergency Management in Pasco County, explains what federal officials looked at to make their decision.

Seven Floridians organizations were awarded $9.95 million to help with the third year of enrollment on the federal marketplace.

The families of more than 35,000 children enrolled in the Florida Healthy Kids program will soon have to choose between two more expensive plans, or find new insurance.

After issuing a heath advisory for West Nile Virus earlier this week, the Department of Health in Pinellas County has confirmed its first case of the virus in a human since 2007.

Today, Governor Rick Scott declared a State of Emergency for Florida in preparation for Tropical Storm Erika.

Daylina Miller / WUSF 89.7 News

Summer break is ending and things are getting busy at Bay area college campuses once again.

3,500 new students - a mix of freshmen, transfer and international students - moved into residence halls on the University of South Florida's Tampa campus Thursday.

In a small room covered with posters for diabetes prevention and free eye clinics, and a physician’s desk stacked with papers, Karen Cascone meets with her nurse practitioner.

Thousands of seniors in the Tampa Bay area may be helping train the next generation of health professionals.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

While two residents in the flooded Port Richey neighborhood of Gulf Highlands chose to evacuate their homes, others, like Craig Caley, stayed behind.

Caley's house is one of several on Ashwood Drive boxed in by water that is waist deep at its worst. Caley said residents could slowly drive to work or for groceries through the flooding last week, but by Sunday night, they were stuck. 

Daylina Miller/WUSF

At the First Presbyterian Church of New Port Richey, 5-year-old George Blowers IV snaps together pieces of a toy pirate ship with the help of a Red Cross volunteer.

A Red Cross volunteer plays with George Blowers IV in the toy room at the First Presbyterian Church of Port Richey after his parent's kitchen and his bedroom flooded in their New Port Richey home.Credit Daylina Miller/WUSFEdit | Remove

LAMEcon Staff

The Pasco County Library System is hosting its seventh annual "Library, Anime and Manga Enthusiasts Convention" this weekend. LAMEcon is a free convention that aims to make pop culture accessible to everyone, no matter how much money they have.

Paul Stonebridge, the teen services manager for the Pasco County Library System, said the Tampa Bay area hosts a number of great conventions, like Metrocon, but not everyone can afford to attend them.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

“Oooooh, a shark! Look! That's the one that ate Nemo!"

Keriann Roque ran up to the glass where she pointed out a shark swimming in the tank a few feet above her head. She gasped as it circled around to swim closer. The 12 year old was at the Florida Aquarium for a summer camp field trip.

She said learning more about sharks has made her less afraid of them.

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