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Daylina Miller

Reporter

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, joined WUSF Public Media in early 2015 to help expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University.

Contact Daylina at 813-974-8629, on Twitter @DaylinaMiller or by email at daylinamiller@wusf.org

Ways to Connect

A Tampa toll road is among the nation's busiest, a new report shows.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

A street parade and Native American festival kicked off the 70th annual Chasco Fiesta this weekend in New Port Richey.

A prescription drug that counters the effects of an opioid overdose will soon be available over the counter.

Photo courtesy of City of Tarpon Springs.

City of Tarpon Springs crews are working on water and sewer line breaks at a suspected sinkhole.

Roberto Roldan/WUSF News

Several thousand people crowded into the Tampa Convention Center Monday afternoon, as Donald Trump made his second local appearance ahead of the Florida presidential primary.

Roberto Roldan/WUSF

Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders concluded a state tour Thursday night at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa. An estimated crowd of 9,000 packed the Expo Hall to hear the Vermont senator in this final push to Tuesday's presidential primary.

Inside Crystal Hopkins' Tampa home, she gestures to the large, white curio cabinet that dominates her family's dining room.

She pulls open the double doors and plucks a metallic pink canister off the glass shelf.

This year, the National Institutes of Health received $2 billion more for medical research than in previous years, bringing its national funding to $32 billion.

But that's not enough, researchers say. 

With the support of doctors and small businesses, the Florida House has unanimously passed a bill that would clear the way for "direct primary care” agreements.

The Florida Senate is proposing $75 million for children's programs at hospitals that serve the poor.

The Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida supports the proposal, which would bring in just over $21 million for facilities in the Tampa Bay area.

Law enforcement officers, medical professionals and drug educators met Tuesday in Tampa as part of a three-day drug summit to discuss drug trends, policies and solutions to drug abuse.

When Linda Porter listens to Foreigner or Styx, she thinks of her own long-haired guitarist, Pete Thomas.

Pete, her son, died 12 years ago in a New Port Richey hospital. When Porter attends rock concerts now, she imagines Pete's right there with her in the crowd.

Planned Parenthood Responds To Latest Abortion Bill

Feb 4, 2016

A Florida House panel's approval of a bill placing more regulations on abortion clinics led Planned Parenthood activists to Lakeland Thursday, where they spoke out in front of the legislative office of one of the bill sponsors.

With just a few clicks of the mouse, Orlando mom Alyssa Grimes visits with a pediatrician from the comfort of her living room. She logs into a Skype-like application on her laptop, where she virtually meets her child's doctor based across town at Nemours Children's Hospital.

The Associated Press

The 2016 Florida Legislative session starts Jan. 12, and this week on Florida Matters (Tuesday, Jan. 5 at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 10 at 7:30 a.m.), we are previewing some of the bills lawmakers are proposing.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

Using a metal tool called a chakpo, Losang Samten arranges brightly-colored sand into intricate designs at the St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts.

Florida health officials said it's been a mild flu season so far, unlike the last three seasons when doctor offices were filled with patients before Christmas and illnesses peaked by late December.

The Food and Drug Administration announced Monday that it will now allow gay men to donate blood, but there's a catch.

In a makeshift operating room inside a hospital north of Tampa, Payton Santana is learning to fix a broken leg.

The 18-year-old and 49 other young women donned scrubs recently for a day of mock surgeries at the Medical Center of Trinity, taking turns breaking polyurethane bones and restoring them with rods and power tools.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and religious leaders say while they don't see serious backlash against Muslims here, the rhetoric going on nationwide is "un-American.”

Anti-Muslim remarks have surged across the country since the San Bernardino, California shooting earlier this month. A Muslim couple -- later found to be radicalized -- shot and killed 14 people at a holiday work party.

But Buckhorn said incidents like that don't represent the Muslim community or their beliefs.

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