Daylina Miller

Reporter

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, joined WUSF Public Media in early 2015 to help expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University and through the program started Dames & Dice, a tabletop gaming blog.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

A multi-state bus tour pushing for tougher gun legislation came to St. Pete Thursday morning.

The "Vocal Majority" tour is led by former astronaut Mark Kelly and his wife- former Democratic U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

It's a busy Monday morning at the St. Petersburg Free Clinic, and Philip Ertel is here for a check-up. The 60-year-old needs refills for his diabetes and cholesterol medications.

Dr. Trudy Grossman pulls out a stethoscope and checks his lungs. He takes deep breaths in and out.

http://www.thafl.com/

The Tampa Housing Authority announced this week that it was approved for a federal grant that will help poor Floridians get better jobs.

The $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will connect people in public housing with education, training and job placement as part of the national Jobs-Plus Initiative.

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About 150,000 gallons of sewage spilled early Tuesday in Clearwater on McMullen Booth Road near the intersection of Abby Crescent Lane.

The spill, caused by a broken pipe, seeped onto a nearby property and into Alligator Creek.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

This Florida Matters segment originally aired on June 28, 2016.

A massive fish kill in the Indian River Lagoon in spring has been linked to fertilizer use, and with growing concerns about pesticides and where food comes from, more people are growing their own produce right in their own yard. 

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

WUSF recently launched an occasional series called “Art Populi,” an occasional series that is focusing on public art.

From city murals to street sculptures and free art, we're hoping to shed a new light on the Tampa Bay's art scene.

For our second story, we follow two artists as they abandon their creations in Pinellas and Pasco Counties.

The Healthy Start Coalition of Hillsborough County will hold a Zika forum Friday in Tampa to address concerns about pregnancy.

Zika infection is linked to microcephaly, a birth defect that causes infants to be born with small heads.

Jane Murphy, the executive director of the Healthy Start Coalition of Hillsborough County, said the forum will educate both the public and health care workers.

Screenshot from Pasco County TV.

Pasco County has identified about $89 million in damages from Hurricane Hermine, making this one of the costliest disasters in Pasco County.

It's a balmy Saturday morning at the Rotary campground in Brandon. Dark clouds are threatening to unleash the fury of a Florida summer rainstorm, so the canoes and kayaks have been packed up for the day.

Now, the teens are just hanging out. Some are getting their nails and hair done, others are doing arts and crafts.

But this isn't your typical summer camp.

Cathy Carter/WUSF

Have you ever walked down a street  in an eclectic neighborhood, a college campus or in the heart of a city's downtown and seen something that caught your eye? Perhaps it was a piece of public art.

In a few weeks, WUSF News is starting an occasional series called “Art Populi.” We’ll be reporting from counties around the Tampa Bay area on whimsical houses, public art galleries, abandoned art, city murals and more.

Consumer advocacy group Florida CHAIN released a new report Wednesday that once again calls for the expansion of Medicaid in the state.

The push comes despite the fact that Florida House lawmakers have shut down expansion of the health care for the poor each year since 2010.

Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority Facebook livestream.

During it's "State of Transit" meeting, the Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority announced plans for a regional transit study starting Oct. 1.

Florida and 42 other states fail to give the public easy access to health care pricing, according to a new report.

Pasco County Commissioners met Tuesday in Dade City to discuss an extension on a county-wide ban on medical marijuana dispensaries.

Commissioners say the ban is needed until the county gets on the same page with law enforcement and land development coding.

  With the hum of the bus' engine in the background, Doctor Maria Pardo looks at 2-year-old Isabella Rodriquez's teeth. The toddler is nervous, and keeps closing her mouth. To help distract her, Pardo counts Isabella's teeth out loud as she inspects them with a dental mirror.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

The Hillsborough County Public School System board hired a consultant last year to see where the district can make cuts and save money.

Jeff Eakins, the Hillsborough County Public Schools Superintendent, addressed some of those proposed moves at his "State of the District" presentation Wednesday.

Daylina Miller / WUSF

WUSF News has embarked on a new storytelling mission called "Telling Tampa Bay Stories," where our journalists will be visiting some of the region’s lesser-known spots to record interviews with members of those communities.

Daylina Miller/WUSF

Presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton visited Tampa Friday, in the wind up to her party's convention in Philadelphia.

Ledger of Lakeland

Employees of the Ledger of Lakeland newspaper are trying to form a union after repeated staff cutbacks and no raises for eight years.

It used to be that if you wanted to watch a surgery, you had to sit in a gallery behind a glass panel. And even then, you usually had to be a medical student. The surgeon performed on the other side, but there was no interaction between the doctor and spectators.

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